Stein Center offering program for seniors impacted by Sandy

Flooding at 14th Street and Avenue C. (Photographer unknown.)

Cars partially submerged in floodwater during Hurricane Sandy at 14th Street and Avenue C. (Photographer unknown.)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

For many people living and working in Manhattan, the direct effects of Hurricane Sandy ended when the electricity came back and subway service was restored. But like local businesses and institutions that undertook the painstaking work of rebuilding, still an ongoing process almost two and a half years later, residents who live in areas that flooded are also still recovering. A new program from the Department for the Aging available at the Stein Senior Center on East 23rd Street is trying to help ease the emotional effects of the disaster, specifically catering to seniors.

The $1.7 million in funding for SMART-MH (Sandy Mobilization, Assessment, Referral and Treatment for Mental Health) was awarded from FEMA to the Aging in New York Fund by Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office through the Superstorm Sandy Social Services Block Grant in 2013.

The Department for the Aging and the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College are working together to execute the program, which started at the Stein Center in February and is exclusively available for New Yorkers age 60 and older. Stein Center Executive Director Jane Barry said that the free program will be available as long as there are seniors who meet the criteria, and noted that a number of people have been helped already.

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Police arrest suspect in string of armed robberies

Kenneth Nottage as he appears in a police wanted poster

Kenneth Nottage as he appears in a police wanted poster

By Sabina Mollot

On Saturday, police arrested a man they believ to behind a string of armed heists at businesses near Stuyvesant Town and in the East Village as well as in another neighborhoods.

Kenneth Nottage, 47, who police said lives in Gramercy at 347 East 18th Street, was apprehended in the 19th Precinct, which covers the Upper East Side.

Over the weekend, police had circulated a wanted poster for Nottage, at the time listing his last known address in Staten Island.

Nottage was collared after allegedly hitting a dozen stores in nine days, in each case either pulling a knife or simulating a gun while demanding cash. One shop employee told Town & Village last week he’d worn a stocking over his face.

Police said he is facing four counts of robbery for the third, seventh, ninth and 12th incidents, while the others are still being investigated by the Central Robbery Division. He’s also facing burglary charges.

In just one of the incidents, despite an alleged threat to shoot an employee, Nottage left the store empty-handed, after an employee gave him a shove.
This was at East Village Fruit and Vegetable at 229 Avenue B at 1:45 a.m. on Tuesday, April 7. At that time, Nottage allegedly placed on object onto an employee’s back, stating, in substance, “Don’t move or I’m going to shoot you!”

He then allegedly demanded that the cashier, another employee, open the register and give him cash. The workers refused and one shoved Nottage, who then ran out of the deli.

A spokesperson for the NYPD and the D.A. did not have additional information as to how Nottage was apprehended.

He has three prior arrests although no information was available as to those incidents, and his next court appearance is scheduled for April 17.

Nottage’s Legal Aid attorney, Richard Charney, declined to comment on the charges.

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Letters to the Editor, Apr. 16

Apr16 Toon Hillary gray

Critical letter writers shouldn’t hide

Re: Letter, “Rude behavior should not be expected” by an author whose name was withheld, T&V, Apr. 9, which was written in response to a letter by Billy Sternberg, “What tenants can realistically expect,” T&V, Mar. 19. This was one of several letters that ran recently on the topic of disruptive, noisy neighbors.

“Hey, Billy, I don’t know if you’ve seen it but someone took a cheap shot at you in the Town & Village.”

“Yeah,” I shot back, “and they didn’t have the courage of their convictions to sign it.”

“That’s right,” my neighbor recalled with a look of surprise, “they were withheld names from Peter Cooper Village.”

A week earlier, ironically, another neighbor stopped me to ask, “Was that your letter in the Town & Village?” When I confirmed that it was, she said, “Thank you. Keep writing.”

More ironic, since the topic of the many letters to T&V was noisy neighbors, my neighbor who alerted me to the anonymous letter is the world’s quietest, and, he lives in the apartment above the woman who wants me to write more frequently. She’s elderly and frail. Neither of them can endure our area’s Saturday night revelry. You call security when you want to call. I’ll call them when I want to call. Disability exemptions; senior exemptions, rent guideline rollbacks, MCI rebates and vacancy decontrol are the critical, priority matters.

I can’t understand why T&V would publish anonymous “cheap shots” but I ask that they change their policy to not doing so. If mine is “one of the oddest letters,” my critics have ever read in T&V, please show us the others.

Billy Sternberg, ST

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