Hundreds head out for tenant rally

Tenants carry signs at a rally for stronger rent laws. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Tenants carry signs at a rally for stronger rent laws. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On Thursday night, hundreds of tenants and housing activists and numerous politicians gathered to rally for stronger rent laws, with the laws expected to be renewed in Albany on June 15.

The rally took place downtown in Foley Square, followed by a march over the Brooklyn Bridge.

During the rally, politicians spoke on the theme of needing to end vacancy decontrol and end 20 percent vacancy bonuses and to reform MCI (major capital improvement) rent increases to make them temporary as well as reforming IAI (individual apartment improvement) increases.

City Council Housing Chair Jumaane Williams was one of the speakers, eliciting cheers when he told the crowd if the rent laws weren’t strengthened it would be the fault of one person — “Governor Andrew Cuomo.” He then led a chant of “We will remember!” that reverberated through the street.

Other speakers at the event included Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, Public Advocate Letitia James, Comptroller Scott Stringer and Assembly Housing Chair Keith Wright. Local attendees included State Senator Brad Hoylman, Assembly Member Brian Kavanagh and Council Member Dan Garodnick.

The real stars of the event, however, were the many creative signs brandished by tenants, including a bunch that depicted building windows with spaces for their holders’ faces to show through with the slogan “Not moving.” Some tenants carried signs or wore boxes designed to look like buildings. Even more signs included, “Blood sucking landlords call for stronger rent laws” with a graphic of a giant bedbug, a banner with landlords depicted as dragons shootings flames onto a building, and the ST-PCV Tenants Association’s graphic of a vulture overlooking Stuyvesant Town.

One of the Stuy Town residents marching, Nancy Arons, commented on statements recently made by Cuomo about how the rent laws could just be extended as they are or tweaked slightly. The reason for this, the governor had explained, was all the turmoil in Albany.

“Well,” commented Arons in response. “That’s not our fault, is it? He wants to run for president, but if you don’t support the people who vote for you, I’m not going to vote for you for president. He thinks he’s his dad, I guess.”

Another marcher was Kavanagh, who, while heading across the bridge, discussed the fact that the “LLC loophole” has been getting some attention in Albany. The loophole has allowed developers to funnel enormous amounts of campaign cash to elected officials through numerous limited liability companies.

Legislation authored by Kavanagh would cap contributions from corporations to a total of $5,000 per calendar year to candidates and/or committees. The legislation passed the Assembly on Tuesday. “Now it’s up to the Senate,” said Kavanagh, although he added that new Senate leader John Flanagan has been dragging his feet on bringing it up.

As for whether or not the legislation will be voted on in the Senate before session ends in five weeks Kavanagh said he doesn’t know. But, he added, “I want to say this is about doing the right thing because people are watching and people are realizing the corruption both in legal and illegal forms.”

One of the rally’s organizers was the healthcare workers’ union, with an 1199SEIU speaker explaining that 70,000 healthcare worker members live in rent regulated housing.

Dogs’ day out in Stuy Town

By Sabina Mollot

On Saturday afternoon, an event for pets was held in Stuyvesant Town’s Playground 9, offering their owners a chance to chat with reps from local pet-related businesses as well as collect a few freebies like photo portraits of themselves with their furry friends.

Participating businesses included Boprey Photography, ABC Animal Hospital, Throw Me a Bone (training and walking service), Petland and Happy Dogs daycare center. Happy Dogs offered pooches free ear cleaning and a moisturizing fur rub as well as holding a contest with a $100 giveaway. Stuy Town management also offered giveaways of doggie bowls, tote bags and poop bags, all festooned with the property’s logo. Dog owners also got a chance to take home some artwork made from their dogs’ paws being dipped in paint.

Local dog owners seemed to appreciate the opportunity to get together without anyone yelling at them to get out of the playground and their dogs, almost of all which were rescues, seemed to appreciate the social interaction and attention.

Photos by Sabina Mollot

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Baruch Campus High School students design gadget that vacuums subway

The Baruch InvenTeam with their prototype (left to right) Ivan Chang, Carmen Li, Kevin Zhang, Long Wang Lin, Wendy Ni, Xiao Hui Zheng, Conan Lin, Sherry Ou Yang, William Chung and Queena Chiu (behind the prototype, left to right) Elton Zhang and Tony Long (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

The Baruch InvenTeam with their prototype (left to right) Ivan Chang, Carmen Li, Kevin Zhang, Long Wang Lin, Wendy Ni, Xiao Hui Zheng, Conan Lin, Sherry Ou Yang, William Chung and Queena Chiu (behind the prototype, left to right) Elton Zhang and Tony Long (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

A group of college-bound seniors at Baruch College Campus High School will soon be heading to MIT to present a detachable rubbish vacuum that they designed and built for use in the subways.

What they came up with is an alternative that they hope the MTA will use to keep the subway tracks clear. The agency currently has entire work trains dedicated to vacuuming up garbage on the tracks, but the prototype that the students have created would instead attach onto the MTA’s existing work trains and, they say, would require less maintenance.

To create the prototype that they primarily worked on in the cramped back section of a classroom, they used motors and filters from actual vacuums, but added on features to make it semi-automatic. The device, which was built on a smaller scale than the real thing to cut down on expenses, has light sensors on the top so it kicks on when it pulls into the station and turns off when back inside the tunnel to conserve energy. Their version operated while plugged into the wall, but in practice the vacuum would draw energy from the third rail, which would also make it more powerful.

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