Ideas for waterfront by Stuy Cove include cafes, elevated park

Area residents listen to a discussion about potential use of the waterfront at a meeting at Washington Irving High School. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Area residents listen to a discussion about potential use of the waterfront at a meeting at Washington Irving High School. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

The coastal resiliency project backed by the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency has announced new possible plans for the waterfront by Stuyvesant Cove Park, with ideas including cafes or an elevated park.

The Tuesday evening workshop held at Washington Irving High School was more interactive than the previous gathering, which was mainly a presentation from ORR director Dan Zarilli and Jeremy Siegel, a project designer with the consultant team of Big U and director of Rebuild by Design.

Rebuild by Design was launched by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and held a competition for resiliency ideas, which resulted in the Big U project to protect the coastline known as the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project.

ORR senior policy advisor Carrie Grassi said this week that there was a short gap between the end of the contest and the beginning of the design process, but the project is now gaining more momentum.

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Letters to the Editor, May 21

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Bikes in ST? Only with extreme caution

The following letter was originally published as a comment on Town & Village Blog (town-village.com) by Brian Van in response to the letters, “Bike riding should be allowed in Stuy Town” and “Motorized bikes putting tenants in danger,” in T&V, May 14.

It’s really critical to understand that no one at all should be riding motorized bicycles through the middle paths of PCV/ST. This is immoral behavior considering the risks, and the NYPD should be writing tickets for this. It’s fish in a barrel.

As for “normal” bicycles:

I understand that many people would have reservations about PCV/ST being permissive of this. My understanding is that it would only be workable if bicycles used defined pathways and proceeded very slowly, with extreme caution, just as a way of connecting to the interior driveways. If that were to be followed, and if the cyclists were yielding to pedestrians and keeping a very long distance away from them, there can be some safe sharing of some of the paths. It’s no different from the sharing of space on the West Side Greenway, which has similar shared paths. But it wouldn’t work if everyone came tearing through at 20 mph – there would need to be restraint by the cyclists.

It’s important to consider: the PCV/ST property cut off all of the travel among side streets when it was established, and the perimeter streets were built to maximize parking and auto speed, not pedestrian or bicycle safety. First Avenue has gotten better, but the perimeter streets on the north and east are still shamefully unsafe for bicycles, and on the eastern perimeter the East River Greenway is triple-barricaded from the street by quite a lot of concrete and steel encumbrances. There is an ethical duty for the stakeholders here to consider remedies for that situation, including additional shared paths and/or petitions to the DOT to re-imagine the perimeter streets as safety-first corridors and not as highways. To be clear: Any bicycle travelling quickly through PCV/ST should be ticketed for proceeding recklessly, in any situation.

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Man on bike snatching phones and bags from women in Gramercy and Flatiron

Phone and bag snatching suspect

Phone and bag snatching suspect

Police are looking for a man who’s stolen from at least eleven women throughout the Gramercy and Flatiron neighborhoods while riding a bike. Cops say the man has been riding up to women and then snatches their phones or their purses before pedaling away on either a Citi Bike or a bike with a basket.

The 13th Precinct’s new commanding officer, Captain Brendan Timoney, had warned the community about a cyclist stealing phones out of women’s hands while they’re distracted at the last Community Council meeting, but details on the crimes weren’t released by police until Wednesday night.

Cops say the larceny pattern, which began in February, is as follows:

On Monday, February 2 at around 11:30 p.m., the man snatched an iPhone from a a 32-year-old woman who was walking on 6th Avenue.

On Tuesday, February 3 at around 10:30 p.m., he grabbed an iPhone from a a 34-year-old woman walking on West 19th Street near 5th Avenue.

On Saturday, February 28 at 9 p.m., the man stole a phone from a 21-year-old woman walking on East 20th Street at Second Avenue.

On Saturday, March 7 at 11:30 p.m. the man snatched a purse from a 34-year-old woman as she walked along East 27th Street, in the vicinity of Third Avenue.

On Sunday, March 15 at 2:20 a.m., the man swiped a purse from a 29-year-old woman who was in front of 100 West 21st Street.

On Sunday, March 15 at 10:40 p.m., the man grabbed a phone out of a 22-year-old woman’s hand as she was walking along East 22nd Street.

On Tuesday, March 31 at 1 a.m., he grabbed a phone from a 24-year-old woman who was walking on East 21st Street near Park Avenue South.

On Saturday, April 4 at 6 a.m. he stole a phone from a 21-year-old woman who was standing in front of 32 East 32nd Street.

On Monday, April 20 at midnight, the man took a phone from a 27-year-old woman walking on 6th Avenue, in the vicinity of West 16th Street.

On Tuesday, April 28 at 1 a.m., he stole a purse from a 23-year-old woman in front of 544 6th Avenue.

On Wednesday, April 29, 2015, at 10:30 p.m., he grabbed a purse from a 42-year-old woman who was in front of 135 East 17th Street.

There were no injuries reported in any of the incidents and police say the the serial cyclist thief is a black man with a beard.

Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800-577-TIPS or submit tips by logging onto www.nypdcrimestoppers.com or texting tips to 274637(CRIMES) then enter TIP577.