Petite Abeille on the hunt for new logo

The Belgian restaurant is turning 20. The Peter Cooper location is now over 10. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

The Belgian restaurant is turning 20. The Peter Cooper location is now over 10. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

Petite Abeille, the Belgian restaurant well known for being family-friendly as well as its mouth-watering Croque Monsieurs, will soon be turning 20.

Yves Jadot, who owns the restaurant’s two locations (one in Peter Cooper Village, the other in Chelsea) with his brothers Christophe and David, said the company is going to be celebrating the landmark in part with a contest to design a new logo for the restaurant. Currently, it’s an image of a cute, smiling bee, since the meaning of Petite Abeille is “little bee.”

“What we’re saying is she’s all grown up,” explained Jadot. “She’s going to be 20 on July 19. She needs a facelift because she’s not a little girl anymore. The logo is a bit childish so we’re trying to make it more mature.”

July 19 is also when the restaurant in Peter Cooper will be holding its annual Belgian Day celebration, which usually includes a Miss Belgium pageant.
As for the art contest the company plans to hold, the winner will get a $1,000 cash prize as well as a life time of free brunch. Details on how to enter will soon be on the restaurant’s website.

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New lighting planned for Kips Bay around homeless shelter

Council Members Dan Garodnick and Rosie Mendez outside the 30th Street men’s shelter Photo by David Kimball-Stanley)

Council Members Dan Garodnick and Rosie Mendez outside the 30th Street men’s shelter (Photo by David Kimball-Stanley)

By Sabina Mollot

City Council Members and Dan Garodnick and Rosie Mendez are hoping to shed a little light on the subject of resident safety in Kips Bay.

The plan is to have new lighting installed on the streets around the Bellevue shelter on East 30th Street and First Avenue. Additional lighting is also planned for a nearby playground, Bellevue South and possibly other playgrounds.

The project is in response to concerns by neighbors of the shelter, who, as Town & Village reported last week, feel that the city-run facility’s 850 residents have gotten out of control with aggressive panhandling, loitering, fighting, public urination and sometimes worse.

On a recent evening Garodnick and Mendez took a stroll through the neighborhood along with employees of the Department of Transportation’s lighting division to see which streets could use more visibility.

Though Garodnick said all the exact locations have not yet been determined, the block of the shelter, from 29th to 30th Streets along First Avenue, will be included as will 30th Street between First and Second Avenues. The manager of the residential building located there has said men have used that block as a toilet and the ledge of the adjoining garage wall as a bed.

“We are exploring funding those initiatives as soon as this month in the city budget which we are about to pass,” said Garodnick.

He added that he doesn’t know yet what the project will cost since it hasn’t yet been determined if the lighting will be standard DOT issue or a “less ordinary solution.”

Another safety improvement planned is to cut back any overgrown trees along 30th Street between First and Second Avenues which have been impeding light.