Garodnick, Brewer propose database for pending and existing landmarks

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Councilmember Dan Garodnick worked with Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer to introduce a bill at the end of June that would require the Landmarks Preservation Commission to create a publicly accessible database.

The database would provide a central location for New Yorkers to search for places that have been designated a landmark, historic district, interior landmark and scenic landmarks, and would also include those that are presently under consideration. Garodnick and the Borough President are working on several other bills that would reform the landmarks process as well.

“It shouldn’t be a mystery what buildings or areas are up for landmark consideration, and we need to open up this process,” Garodnick said.

Stuyvesant Town itself has been the topic of discussion in landmarking conversations as long ago as 2001 when the Historic Districts Council announced support for designating the property a landmark.

Residents re-launched a campaign for landmarking in 2008, two years after Tishman Speyer purchased the property, with long-time residents reasoning at the time that there was some concern about big changes the new owner might make and landmarking was seen as a form of protection.

Today, the property is still under consideration.

Brewer said the proposed database will ensure a smoother landmarks process.

“A single, central, searchable database will make the landmarks process work better for everyone – property owners, preservationists, and the Landmarks Preservation Commission itself,” she said .

Advertisements

Two Gramercy dogs will say ‘I do’

Shorty (left) and Riley at the store where Shorty has become the official mascot (Photo courtesy of Cauz for Pawz)

Shorty (left) and Riley at the store where Shorty has become the official mascot (Photo courtesy of Cauz for Pawz)

By Sabina Mollot

The concept of a dog wedding is hardly anything new. Passionate pet owners who’ve gotten Fido hitched in fancy ceremonies have even include Grammy-winner John Legend as well as numerous owners who’ve reportedly spent six figures for lavish puptials. And there’s another thing that’s not new. Articles on the subject of canine coupling dripping with shameless — albeit admittedly clever — pooch puns ranging from “puppy love” to “muttrimony.”

So why, you may be asking, is Town & Village writing about it now? Because at Cauz for Pawz, a Gramercy thrift shop, a dog wedding will be taking place in September — and we’re all invited. The bride and groom are both seniors at 14 years old and rescues. The bride, Shorty, was adopted by the nonprofit shop’s director, Cathryn Duhigg, at an adoption event that was held at Cauz for Pawz. Due to Shorty’s being a bit on the barky side, “no one else wanted her,” said Duhigg. But Duhigg said she was able to get past the chihuaha terrier mix’s annoying habit. This was after realizing that as a result of Shorty’s having been given up by her last owner who she lived with for 13 years, and then being fostered for a while, “she was destroyed.” The formerly lonely Shorty has since become the East 23rd store’s mascot, working alongside her owner. She still barks a lot at just about everyone.

That is, until the day that Riley came along. Duhigg said she knew he was the one when Shorty met him and didn’t start yapping.

Continue reading

ST resident’s photo book aims to capture change

A photo by Regina Walker of the Manhattan skyline reflected in a neighbor’s window

A photo by Regina Walker of the Manhattan skyline reflected in a neighbor’s window

By Sabina Mollot

Regina Walker, a Stuyvesant Town resident and psychotherapist, has released a book of photos called Through My Eyes. The book, which is done in the style of a photo journal, was published in May by Inner Child Press, and includes around 50 images, mostly cityscapes taken in New York City.

Some were taken in the author’s own neighborhood.

Walker, who’s always taken photos and has shown her work at spaces in New York (Ceres Gallery, Staten Island Museum) as well as Florida and California, said she had been approached by the publisher with the idea of doing a photo journal.

“It’s kind of like looking at someone’s diary, but something to see as well as to read,” she said.

Through My Eyes, in an online summary, has also been described as being about grief. While that, Walker acknowledged, “sounds depressing,” she stressed that it really is more about change, which, by definition, includes confronting the void of what was.

Continue reading

Vets in mental health programs saluted at VA hospital luncheon

Jennifer Falk, executive director  of the Union Square Partnership, talks to veterans at the event. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Jennifer Falk, executive director of the Union Square Partnership, talks to veterans at the event. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

The Union Square Partnership showed its appreciation of veterans last Thursday at the VA Hospital by bringing the former service members a boxed lunch from The Pavilion restaurant.

Local recovery coordinator John Tatarakis said that the VA worked with the Partnership for a similar event last year but that event was held on Memorial Day. The delay this year was due to renovations that were being done on the kitchen in the hospital’s clubhouse, where the event was held, and he added that this was the first time that everyone was allowed back into the space after the improvements.

The luncheon was available to veterans who have been participating in the various mental health programs available at the hospital, including the Mentorship for Addiction Problems to Enhance Engagement to Treatment (MAP-ENGAGE) program, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) program, Compensated Work Therapy (CWT), Substance Abuse Recovery Program (SARP) program and others. Executive director of the Union Square Partnership Jennifer Falk thanked the veterans for their service and said that one of her goals at the Partnership is to work with groups in the community to improve the quality of life for everyone.

Continue reading