Week In Review, Aug. 13

Rev. Jacob Smith

Rev. Jacob Smith

Several members of the Cavalry-St. George’s parish, including Reverend Jacob Smith and Josh Encinias, were at the All Angels Episcopal Church in Twilight Park, Greene County over the weekend when a fire broke out. Everyone was able to escape the building and although several people were hospitalized, all are expected to make a full recovery. The building was destroyed in the fire, which is believed to be electrical in origin. Reverend Smith will be at Calvary-St. George’s next Sunday and available then to provide an update.

Stuyvesant Town resident and swimmer Simona Dwass completed a big race on the first Saturday in August. The recent high school graduate was attempting the Manhattan Island Marathon Swim, taking a counterclockwise turn about the island, and she made it in eight hours and 20 minutes. She was initially worried that the water temperature might be an impediment to her finishing but managed to overcome the obstacle. “I was cold, but just kept going,” she said. “Overall it was a great adventure.”

Breastfeeding mothers and families, elected officials and advocates from throughout the city participated in the “NYC Breastfeeding Leadership Council’s Annual Breastfeeding Subway Caravan” on the steps of City Hall on Friday.
After the rally, the caravan traveled on the A train to Bedford-Stuyvesant’s Restoration Plaza for the Brooklyn Alliance for Breastfeeding Empowerment’s (B.A.B.E.) day-long breastfeeding celebration. The Breastfeeding Leadership Council seeks to draw attention to the fact that too many women are still being questioned or harassed for breastfeeding in public.
At the rally, Maloney was presented with the NYC Breastfeeding Leadership Council’s Breastfeeding Champion Award for her leadership in promoting breastfeeding as an option for working mothers. For many years, Maloney has introduced legislation to promote and protect a mother’s right to breastfeed. She partnered with Senator Jeff Merkley to include a provision in the Affordable Care Act stating that employers must provide breastfeeding employees with “reasonable break time” and a private, non-bathroom place to express breast milk during the workday, until the child’s first birthday.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Bellevue Hospital to build flood wall

Waterside Tenants Association President Janet Handal has expressed concern about the project's construction. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Waterside Tenants Association President Janet Handal has expressed concern about the project’s construction. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Bellevue Hospital is in the beginning stages of a plan that aims to protect the facility from future Hurricane Sandys and released an environmental assessment on the project at the beginning of July. The document is the first the Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), Bellevue’s parent organization, has released concerning the project and outlines the most viable alternative, a comprehensive mitigation system, which consists of a “perimeter boundary protection system” or flood wall around the hospital center. It will include a series of connected permanent and removable walls and integrated flood gates, as well as new elevators, a secondary domestic water pumping system, relocation of the HVAC equipment to above the 500-year flood plain and other features.

Other alternatives that were discussed in the document but that were ultimately dismissed include relocation of the hospital center or just a flood wall with no other changes. Relocation is not being considered because HHC does not think it practical to abandon the infrastructure investments that have been made on the existing site. The second alternative has been dismissed because while it is expected to provide similar flood protection to the wall in the selected plan, HHC wanted to incorporate a “Multiple Lines of Defense” strategy.

Continue reading

UPDATED: Cops looking for man who sexually abused woman on subway at 23rd St.

Sex abuse suspect (Photo via NYPD)

Sex abuse suspect (Photo via NYPD)

Police are asking the public’s assistance identifying a man wanted for sexual abuse on the subway at 23rd Street.

On Saturday, August 8, at 6:45 p.m., the victim, a 23-year-old woman, was standing on the north bound platform of the N/R train at the 23rd Street station when the suspect walked up to her, put one arm around her and then took his other hand, put it up her skirt and sexually abused her. The suspect then fled the station.

The suspect is a white or Hispanic man, 35 to 40-years-old, 5 ft. 10 ins. tall and bald.

Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800-577-TIPS. The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at www.nypdcrimestoppers.com or texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

UPDATE:

Police have collared a Flatiron man in connection with the incident.

Daniel Galantter, 47, of 118 West 22nd Street, was arrested on Thursday and charged with stalking and sex abuse.

Letters to the Editor, Aug. 13

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

How we can help the homeless around ST

I am writing in response to the letter that was sent in about the homeless people sleeping on benches in Stuyvesant Town and the lack of actions from our security department (“Homeless around ST,” T&V, July 30).

I’d like to focus on the word people for a moment. Yes, there are people sleeping on benches in Stuyvesant Town and begging on the street along First Avenue and other places in the city. We do have a big homeless problem but the problem is not with the security department at Stuyvesant Town. The problem is so much bigger than that.

These are people. People like you and me who have met with hard times or a mental illness that they did not ask for. And they are people. People who need shelter, a place to sleep, food, companionship and meaningful work. This problem needs addressing from a perspective so much bigger than the security department here. I’ve seen countless articles and interviews on TV from our mayor addressing the horse drawn carriages and their plight.

I’d like to see a focus on humans over horses at the moment. I’d like to see our politicians addressing this homeless problem and how we can offer useful help to these people so that we don’t have to feel uncomfortable about encountering them in our community and more importantly they have a place to sleep each night that is sheltered, offers them nourishment and encouragement to better lives.

My small Band-Aid of the solution is to carry breakfast bars in my handbag. Along with the breakfast bars I carry a referral card to the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen where they offer a daily hot meals and counseling to help people get off the streets.

When I encountered homeless people in our neighborhood or in other places that I walk during the day I’m able to offer them an immediate solution of something to eat and a longer-term solution of a place to go where they can find solutions if they want them.

I encourage anyone interested to join me on this mission. It’s just one small way that we can help address this problem while forces with resources bigger than ours can address a long-term solution.

With blessings,

Susan Turchin, ST

Continue reading