The bed bug diaries

Landlords are responsible for treating an apartment for bed bugs, but tenants are responsible for preparing the apartment, which can be a costly endeavor.

Landlords are responsible for treating an apartment for bed bugs, but tenants are responsible for preparing the apartment, which can be a costly endeavor.

One Stuy Town couple’s nightmare

By Sabina Mollot

For the past two months, a Stuyvesant Town building, 8 Stuyvesant Oval, has been battling a bedbug infestation.

While the sighting of bed bugs is hardly a New York novelty, one of the residents in the buildings whose apartment is affected agreed to be interviewed by Town & Village in the hope that it would help prepare neighbors if they ever find themselves in the same situation.

For the resident, Don Reynolds, and his wife Nancy, the ordeal has had a price tag of over $9,000 in apartment treatment prep fees and other costs relating to the couple’s so far losing war on the blood-sucking invaders.

A spokesperson for CWCapital, when asked for comment on the situation, told T&V that bed bugs have actually been on the decline in Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village as a result of “aggressive” methods aimed at staying one step ahead of the problem.

“Any resident who is concerned about bedbugs should contact management immediately to arrange for an inspection,” the rep, Brian Moriarty, said. “Management follows citywide best practices and treats bedbugs aggressively. As a result, new bedbug cases at PCVST have decreased 11 percent compared to last year and 20 percent compared to 2013. If a resident does have bed bugs, we provide information on how to prepare the apartment for treatment, which in most cases can be done by residents themselves at a nominal expense. Some residents, however, choose to hire third-party vendors for this work.”

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Garodnick, Brewer say keep the plazas

By Sabina Mollot

In response to the countless news stories about topless women in body paint shilling for tips from tourists in Times Square, one response that’s been panned by pols is the idea to scrap pedestrian plazas. This was first brought up by Police Commissioner Bratton, since the Times Square plaza is where most of the complaints about professional photo bombers — both the painted women and costumed Elmos and Olafs — have been stemming from.

But while the city plans its task force to study the legality of the business being done by both groups — specifically whether these “performers’” First Amendment rights trump the rights of tourists and locals who don’t want to be accosted by them —pols have come out in defense of the plazas.

Council Member Dan Garodnick, whose district recently shifted to include the eastern half of Times Square, is one of them.

Garodnick does want the panhandling pandemonium to be addressed, though. He told Town & Village that while he’s looking at both issues, he feels it’s mostly the costumed characters rather than the painted ladies who are the bigger problem.

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