Cauz for Pawz holds costume parade for pooches

On Sunday, Cauz for Pawz held a Halloween parade and costume contest for dogs at the thrift store’s new location on First Avenue opposite Stuyvesant Town.

Contestants’ owners showed plenty of creativity with their furry friends’ costumes, like with Jax, the pooch that won first place, dressed up as the “Breaking Bad” RV. Jax’s owners, Morgan and Jack, won brunch at Bluebell café on Third Avenue. The second place winner was Milan, who was dressed up as a U.S. Marine. Third place winner was Kurtis, who was wearing lederhosen. Other costumes included French maid and Mardi Gras participant.

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Air rights transfer could pave way for more affordable housing: expert

Michael Greenberg

Michael Greenberg

By Sabina Mollot

Blackstone’s $5.3 billion purchase of Stuy Town also bought the firm a jumbo 700,000 square feet of air rights that could wind up being “just the tip of the iceberg” in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to preserve and build affordable housing in the city, according to one expert.

News of the air rights in Stuy Town — and new owner Blackstone’s claim over them, along with the 110-building property, was reported in the Wall Street Journal last week.

While the value of the air or development rights wasn’t clear since it depends where they’d end up, commercial real estate attorney Michael Greenberg, also founder and CEO of the Level Group brokerage firm, predicted many more similar arrangements in the future as the city looks for creative ways to get those elusive units of affordable housing.

In Stuyvesant Town, this meant preservation, and if air rights are transferred elsewhere, possibly new affordable housing.

Blackstone and its partner in the Stuy Town deal, Ivanhoe Cambridge, have gotten the city’s support to transfer the Stuy Town air rights since the owner has made a commitment not to build on the property’s open spaces or its existing structures.

“What’s unusual is that it’s rare for the city to allow it — there have been requests for them to allow the transfer to sites that are not contiguous or to other neighborhoods even,” said Greenberg.

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Pols ask Blackstone’s intentions on ST air rights

Comptroller Scott Stringer Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Comptroller Scott Stringer (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Local elected officials, while generally enthusiastic about the deal that the city has struck with Blackstone for Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village, still have some concerns about the details of the agreement, specifically regarding air rights.

Those four officials — Comptroller Scott Stringer, State Senator Brad Hoylman, Assembly Member Brian Kavanagh and Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney — addressed some of these issues in a letter to Jonathan Gray, the global head of real estate for the company, on Monday.

According to the Department of City Planning, “air rights” refers to the difference between the maximum amount of floor area that is allowed on a zoning lot and the actual built floor area. A transfer of air rights, sometimes known as unused development rights, allows that space to be transferred from one zoning lot to another, usually used to preserve historic buildings or open space. Air rights can usually be shifted from one adjacent lot to another but in the cases where historic buildings or open spaces are at stake, a transfer to a different location farther away is sometimes permitted.

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Blackstone addresses tenants’ concerns

Market raters bash deal, ask for insider priority on affordable apts.,

Blackstone says students have been top complaint of residents

Assembly Member Brian Kavanagh, Blackstone senior managing director Nadeem Meghji, Department of Housing Preservation and Development Commissioner Vicki Been, Congress Member Carolyn Maloney, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, Council Member Dan Garodnick and ST-PCV Tenants Association President Susan Steinberg listen as Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

Assembly Member Brian Kavanagh, Blackstone senior managing director Nadeem Meghji, Department of Housing Preservation and Development Commissioner Vicki Been, Congress Member Carolyn Maloney, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, Council Member Dan Garodnick and ST-PCV Tenants Association President Susan Steinberg listen as Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

Following the news about a change in ownership just a few days earlier, over 500 Stuy Town residents showed up at a meeting on Saturday where a representative for the new landlord, Blackstone, answered questions.

Mayor Bill de Blasio popped by for a bit and spoke, as did U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, but the real star of the show wound up being Nadeem Meghji, senior managing director for Blackstone. Meghji started off by telling tenants at Baruch College’s auditorium that their various concerns, brought up in the days following the sale, were being taken “very seriously.” He indicated CompassRock would not continue to manage the complex, but then later said there isn’t a timeline for any change in management teams. Meghji, who was in charge of the Stuy Town deal, frequently elicited applause when responding to tenants’ questions although he admitted he didn’t yet have enough information to answer them all. He told tenants, in response to questions about student apartments, that Blackstone had been hearing about this issue more than any other.

He added that Blackstone would be seeking further tenant feedback via focus groups and a hotline.

“We know that we are going to need to earn your trust,” he said.

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Letters to the Editor, Oct. 29

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

What about the 6,000 other apartments?

I’m writing to express my extreme displeasure with the terms of the recent sale of PCVST, which the mayor and our elected officials have been touting as a victory in the press.

I believe this “victory,” unfortunately, serves the mayor’s political agenda more than it does the PCVST community as a whole. While reserving 5,000 units for affordable housing is a good thing – and an admirable goal to strive for – it will, sadly, come at the expense of the other 6,000+ apartments, including market rate renters, the majority of whom are hard-working families who want to live in PCVST because it is a great place to raise a family and is zoned in a great public school district.

These people are struggling like any other New Yorker. There are no millionaires living here. This deal has sold out more than half of this community – and yet there was Mayor de Blasio, flanked by our trusted elected officials, boasting of how he “saved” STPCV.

The mayor had a real opportunity to effect real change in this community. Instead he took the politically convenient route: finding the easiest way to add numbers to his affordable housing quota. What he failed to take into consideration is PCVST’s uniqueness. It is a whole community, not a spreadsheet. He could have used his political clout to not only save those 5,000 units, but to work toward a plan for tenant ownership, which would have ensured a true, long-lasting, and better community – and helped the community as a whole.

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Police Watch: Man stabbed in Bellevue hospital garden, Teens arrested for ‘assault’

KNIFE ATTACK AT BELLEVUE HOSPITAL GARDEN
Police arrested 28-year-old Francis Salud for allegedly stabbing a man in the garden behind Bellevue Hospital.
Police said that the incident took place on October 18 at 11 a.m. with Salud allegedly hitting the victim, who they said was working onsite, with a knife, causing multiple deep gashes to his arm and left torso. According to the District Attorney’s office, Salud and the victim knew each other and the victim needed 73 stitches for the injury. Salud was charged with assault and weapons possession at the 13th Precinct last Monday at 10:15 a.m.
When asked for comment, a spokesperson for Bellevue denied the victim was an employee, but wouldn’t provide further information.

COUPLE ARRESTED FOR SEX ON SIDEWALK
Police arrested a couple on Irving Place and East 14th Street last Wednesday for allegedly having sex in public. Trevor Cline, 25, and Kelly Collins, 38, were allegedly having sexual intercourse on a public sidewalk. Collins was charged with public lewdness and performance of obscenity. Police said that Cline resisted arrest by flailing his arms and going limp, and he was charged with resisting arrest, as well as disorderly conduct, public lewdness and obscene material.

THREE TEENS ARRESTED FOR ‘ASSAULT’ ON FIRST AVENUE
Eighteen-year-old Dominique Etheridge and two other teenagers were arrested for assault in front of the CVS pharmacy at 253 First Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets last Tuesday at 12:48 a.m. Police said that the fight started after an argument and two of the teens punched the victim and kicked him. Etheridge allegedly wrapped his arms around the victim and punched him in the ribs and stomach multiple times. The names of the two teens are being withheld because of their age.

‘MUGGERS’ ARRESTED ON THIRD AVENUE
Police arrested 22-year-olds Dontay Johnson and Joseph Adams for robbery in front of a Duane Reade store at 125 Third Avenue last Saturday at 5:15 a.m. Johnson, Adams and two other people who weren’t arrested allegedly surrounded the victim at the location between 14th and 15th Streets and demanded money. Police said that one of the suspects snatched the victim’s debit card from his hand. The suspects allegedly attempted to flee but Adams and Johnson were arrested. Johnson was also charged with possession of a controlled substance because he was allegedly in possession of four bags of cocaine.

‘TRESPASSER’ PREVIOUSLY NABBED FOR ALLEGED PUBLIC LEWDNESS RETURNS
Police arrested 37-year-old Anton Liverpool for criminal trespass inside 1158 Broadway at 27th Street last Tuesday at 9:37 a.m. Liverpool allegedly remained in the location without permission to be there. After he was brought to the 13th Precinct, he was also charged with two counts of public lewdness for earlier incidents that took place on October 13. Police said that he had been masturbating outside the same building. He was later additionally charged with two counts of burglary, possession of stolen property and petit larceny. He allegedly broke into 1158 Broadway on October 12 and stole watches and perfume when the store there was closed.

MAN ARRESTED FOR ‘STOLEN’ RETURN FROM HOME DEPOT
Police arrested 53-year-old James Poindexter for petit larceny and possession of stolen property in front of the Home Depot at 40 West 23rd Street last Wednesday at 1:59 p.m. Poindexter allegedly approached a group of undercover officers and asked them to return property to the store for him. Police said that he told them someone had stolen the item from the store and gave it to him to return in exchange for store credit. Poindexter was allegedly attempting to defraud Home Depot for the value of the stolen merchandise.

ARREST MADE IN GRAMERCY FOR ‘MDMA’ ROCK AND ‘COCAINE’
Police arrested two people for drugs in front of 285 Third Avenue between East 22nd and 23rd Streets last Friday at 5:15 a.m. Jacob Fashakin, 27, was charged with intent to sell a controlled substance, possession of stolen property and possession of marijuana and 22-year-old Timothy Orlando was charged with possession of a controlled substance and possession of marijuana. Fashakin was found to be in possession of a large rock form of alleged MDMA, a medium-sized ziplock bag of alleged vegetative marijuana and a credit card that police said was stolen. Police said that he was also in possession of various drug packaging and a scale. Orlando was in possession of three small ziplock bags of alleged cocaine and a small alleged marijuana cigarette.

MAN ARRESTED FOR ‘SUSPENDED’ LICENSE AFTER HITTING PEDESTRIAN
Fifty-year-old Helio Bodini was arrested for an unclassified traffic misdemeanor and was charged as an unlicensed operator in front of 114 West 27th Street last Friday at 2:28 p.m. Police were responding to a car accident at the location, where Bodini was driving and accidentally hit a pedestrian. Upon further investigation, police found that Bodini’s license had been previously suspended and revoked. It had been suspended and revoked on two different occasions because he was allegedly driving under the influence of alcohol, in one instance allegedly driving with at least .08 BAC in 2008, and was also suspended because he allegedly failed to pay a driver responsibility assessment.

‘POT’ SMOKER ARRESTED FOR PREVIOUS ALLEGED ROBBERY
Police arrested 35-year-old Tonisha Jordan for possession of marijuana inside 344 East 28th Street last Saturday at 12:14 a.m. and was also charged with an alleged previous robbery. Police said that at the time of her arrest, she was smoking marijuana in a stairwell at the building and upon further investigation, found that she and three men allegedly punched and dragged a 69-year-old man to the ground, causing bruising and swelling to his face. Police said that Jordan stole a gold chain with the letter P from the victim.

PAIR ARRESTED FOR ‘ASSAULT’ AT BROADWAY AND WEST 27TH
Police arrested 23-year-old Kenneth Arias and 36-year-old Leonardo Arias for assault at the corner of Broadway and West 27th Street last Saturday at 10:10 p.m. Police said that the two men punched the victim in the head, causing pain, swelling and a small cut. Police said that the two men arrested got into an argument with a third person, but there was no additional information about what started the dispute.

Editorial: The virtues of experience

By Former Assemblyman Steven Sanders

With all the bombastic declarations of the many candidates running for President, and the electorate seemingly infatuated with political novices with little or no experience in government, we are reminded just this week why an experienced, practiced and steady hand in government is important.

The matter of the sale of Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village as reported in the New York Times and Town & Village is very instructive as it is very significant.

After the unwise sale by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company to Tishman Speyer nearly ten years ago, which quickly unraveled and ultimately imploded, this community has been roiled in uncertainty and instability. At times there was near panic on the part of many tenants who were being threatened with eviction and attempts by outside suitors to convince tenants to buy their apartments at prices that were either unknown or unreliable.

The agreement announced by the city with the Blackstone Group for it to take ownership of this community is a deal that will both preserve the status of all currently rent-stabilized tenants and reserve nearly half of the total apartments at affordable housing levels for the foreseeable future. The deal also precludes any new building on the expansive green areas of Stuyvesant Town which makes this community so unique in our urban setting.

I would argue that given the realities of the housing market and the proclivities of developers, this is about as good an agreement, imperfect as it may be, for current and prospective tenants that could have been achieved.

But without the steady hand of City Councilman Dan Garodnick as well as other public officials, and the tenacious efforts of the Tenants Association led for so many years by Al Doyle, John Marsh and now Susan Steinberg, such a good plan for the future would not have been possible. These people are not novices. Dan Garodnick is among the most capable public officials in all of the City. He calmly and expertly helped to navigate this community through the ups and downs of the past ten years. He resisted quick fixes and brought an intelligence and understanding to the negotiations with the city and the array of temporary owners. He has been rock solid. A maturity that only comes from experience in government.

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Man tries to rape woman in Union Square Park bathroom

Sketch of suspect

Sketch of suspect

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in finding a man who tried to rape a woman in a bathroom at Union Square Park on Sunday.

Cops said at around 3:15 a.m., a 63-year-old woman was inside the bathroom when a man confronted her and demanded she perform a sex act. The woman struggled as she tried to get away, biting the man’s hand in the process and leaving a cut. The wounded thug then fled the location in an unknown direction.

The victim was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment for pain. She was reported to be in stable condition and has since been released.

The suspect is described as black, approximately 30 years old with a thin build, short hair and a long goatee. He last seen wearing a green army camouflage jacket, an orange hooded sweatshirt, dark jeans and a backpack.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips online or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

Roller coaster-like sculpture headed to Madison Sq. Park

Rendering of “Big Bling,”  which will stand 40 feet high (Photo courtesy of Madison Square Park Conservancy)

Rendering of “Big Bling,” which will stand 40 feet high (Photo courtesy of Madison Square Park Conservancy)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

The Madison Square Park Conservancy announced at the beginning of this month that a multi-tier sculpture from American artist Martin Puryear will be the next public installation in the park beginning next May. The structure, which resembles a gilded rollercoaster and called “Big Bling,” will be the largest temporary outdoor public work that Puryear has completed, at 40 feet long and almost 40 feet high.

The structure is the 33rd public art installation by Mad. Sq. Art, the contemporary art program of the conservancy, and will be made of birch plywood and 22-karat gold leaf with multiple levels and wrapped in a fine chain-link fence. It will also include a gold-leafed shackle anchored near the top of the structure.

Puryear, who lives and works in the Hudson Valley region, tends to focus his work on handmade pieces using methods such as carpentry, boat building and other similar trades. His signature material is wood, which he is using for the Madison Square Park sculpture and which serves to anchor the physicality of the enormous piece.

Senior curator Brooke Kamin Rapaport said that the conservancy has been working with Puryear for about a year and a half to develop the piece. They approached him to create a commissioned work for the conservancy, and Big Bling is what he proposed.

“It’s an extraordinary work and though it’s a temporary outdoor piece, it maintains all of the strengths and power of his indoor projects,” she said.

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Halloween events for kids, adults and pets

Dog at last year’s parade at Tompkins Square Park

Dog at last year’s parade at Tompkins Square Park

The following local Halloween events start this weekend:

GREENWICH VILLAGE CHILDREN’S PARADE—NYU and Community Board 2 present the 25th annual Children’s Halloween Parade, the city’s largest free children’s event on Halloween Day, October 31. Parents and children aged 3-12 are invited to gather at the Washington Square Arch by 1 p.m. Children and families will march around Washington Square Park. After the parade, free trick-or-treat bags, games and rides await the children on LaGuardia Place. The event finishes at 4 p.m. The parade assembles along Washington Square North, near the Arch and ends at LaGuardia between Washington Square South and West 3rd Street.

FAIR FOR KIDS IN STUY TOWN—Stuyvesant Town will hold a “Halloween Spooktacular” event on the Oval on Saturday, October 24 at 2 p.m. There will be a haunted house, a pumpkin patch, live music, face painting, crafts, candy and more for residents and their guests.

CARNIVAL AT LITTLE MISSIONARY—Little Missionary’s Day Nursery pre-school will hold a haunted Halloween party on October 31 from noon-4 p.m. at St. Marks Church and the Bowery, at East 10th Street and Second Avenue. There will be a haunted house, puppet show, music, games, cotton candy, hot dogs, face painting, scavenger hunts, creepy stories with Thea Taube and food and drinks. No entry fee, but tickets need to be purchased for food and activities. The music, puppet show and story time will be free.

PARADE FOR PETS NEAR STUY TOWN—Cauz for Pawz thrift shop will be holding its first Halloween parade for pets on Sunday, October 25 from 1-3 p.m. The pets will walk a red carpet and be voted on. The venue is the store’s new location at 333 First Avenue between 19th and 20th Streets. For more information, call (212) 684-7299.

DOG PARADE AT TOMPKINS SQUARE PARK—On Saturday, October 24 from noon-3 p.m., the annual Halloween parade for dogs will take place at Tompkins Square Park. There will be tons of prizes for dogs in costumes at this event, which will be held in the dog run, East 9th Street between Avenues A and B. There will also be local rescue adoptions. Rain date is Sunday.

PARTY FOR KIDS AT WATERSIDE—All resident Waterside children are invited to attend the annual Halloween party on Sat., Oct. 31 from 5-7 p.m. at the Waterside Swim & Health Club, 35 Waterside Plaza and outside on the plaza, weather permitting. The event will feature face painting, a photo booth, a costume contest, a spooktacular number of games and activities and lots and lots of treats. Admission is free and open to resident children of Waterside Plaza. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

COSTUME BALL & PERFORMANCES FOR ADULTS—Theater for the New City, 155 First Ave. at E. 10th St., presents its 38th annual Village Halloween Costume Ball on Saturday, October 31. This unique festival continues as a grand coming-together for everyday New Yorkers and artists alike. A carefree fall tradition, it celebrates the creativity that comes with the season. The one-night fiesta takes over all four of TNC’s theater spaces, plus its lobby and the block of East Tenth Street between First and Second Avenues. Admission is $20; costume or formal wear is required. Once inside, everything is free except food and drink, which are graveyard dirt-cheap. Big-Band Dance orchestras take over the large Johnson Theater. These will include Hot Lavender Swing Band, an all-Gay and Lesbian 18-piece orchestra, and Maquina Mono (The Monkey Machine), a Latin Salsa Rock band. The Johnson Theater will also have aerial dance by Suspended Cirque. Outside, there are R&B and Dixieland bands, fire eaters, jugglers, storyweavers and stilt dancers, all free to the public. Inside, there is theater all evening. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and indoor entertainment begins at 8 p.m. There will be two continuously-running cabarets. Outdoor entertainment will start at  3:30 p.m. Outdoor entertainment is capped by “The Red and Black Masque,” an annual Medieval ritual show written by Arthur Sainer, scored by David Tice and directed by Crystal Field which is performed by torchlight. Scattered through the event will be stilt dancers, jugglers, fire-eaters, Vaudeville playlets, Burlesque and Hellsouls. The annual costume judging begins at midnight with the “Monsters and Miracles Costume Parade,” as all revelers are invited to march past a panel of celebrity judges. Winners will receive one-year passes to TNC and a bottle of Moet and Chandon champagne. Reservations are strongly recommended. For tickets ($20, costume or formal wear required) or more information, call (212) 254-1109 or visit http://www.theaterforthenewcity.net.

Ess-a-Bagel will reopen in Stuy Town

Ess-a-Bagel is coming to Stuyvesant Town. (Photo by Muriel Frost)

Ess-a-Bagel is coming to Stuyvesant Town. (Photo by Melanie Frost)

By Sabina Mollot

Over half a year after closing its longtime home on First Avenue, Ess-a-Bagel will be reopening nearby — in Stuyvesant Town.

The new location is also on First Avenue at 19th Street.

One of the owners, David Wilpon, had previously told Town & Village (off the record) that he was working on a deal but the final papers hadn’t been signed as of last week. Talks had been going on for at least a couple of months though. On Friday, however, a banner was spotted in the store’s window at 324 First Avenue, and residents have already been cheering the news on Facebook and on local blog EVGrieve.

Another owner, Muriel Frost, told T&V on Friday the lease had been signed on Thursday. The new location will be bigger, which will allow the bagel shop to do things that couldn’t be done at the old shop.

“We will do catering and also delivery, which we were not physically equipped to do before,” Frost said.

Frost also said management at Stuyvesant Town had so far been very accommodating whenever Ess-A-Bagel had a request.

“They are very congenial; I really must praise them,” she said.

Meanwhile, Frost said she’s not worried about the new bagel shop in town, Tal Bagels, which got Ess-A-Bagel’s old space at the corner of 21st Street, since Ess-A-Bagel is well known. “We don’t see them as a threat,” she said. “With God’s help and everyone’s good wishes, we will open and we will have a ready audience.”

What took so long in reopening was that other places they’d looked at didn’t end up working out. One landlord on First Avenue, she recalled, changed his mind.

As for when the new location will open, Frost isn’t sure, because it has to be renovated first.

As Town & Village first reported in January, Ess-A-Bagel lost its lease, as did its neighbor, the now-closed Rose restaurant, and Grill 21, another neighboring eatery’s space, was also put on the market. Grill 21 is still open there though on a month-to-month lease. The landlord, an LLC owned by L&M Development head Ron Moelis and others, said it tried to make a deal but Ess-A-Bagel wouldn’t budge when given a rent increase. Ess-A-Bagel’s owners, however, said they were in the midst of negotiations when the landlord told them they were taking too long to sign on the dotted line.

Back in May, Stuyvesant Town’s general manager, David Sorise, said in an interview that Ess-A-Bagel would be “a great tenant to have,” and that tenants often request food-based businesses for the property’s retail spaces.

“It’s not just about which person’s going to pay the most rent,” Sorise said at the time.

Tal Bagels opened in Ess-a-Bagel’s old space on September 25, with a Bank of America soon to open next door.

Having two bagel joints so close to one another may not be the undoing of either company since further south on First Avenue, opposite Stuy Town, sit two other bagel restaurants, David’s and Bagel Boss.

CW made Associated offer to end lease early

The Associated’s owners recently closed a Third Avenue Met Foods supermarket. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Associated Supermarket in Stuyvesant Town (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

The owners of the Associated Supermarket in Stuyvesant Town — who, as Town & Village reported last month — were losing faith they’d be given a lease renewal by CWCapital, finally got that elusive phone call from the landlord.

It just wasn’t the one they wanted.

The offer? Take three quarters of a million dollars to walk away before the lease even ends in two years, one source with knowledge of the situation told Town & Village. However, the store’s principal owner Joseph Falzon felt he could make more if he rode out the rest of the lease term.

Falzon had told Town & Village in September that he hadn’t gotten an answer about renewal for over a year with CW declining to talk business, while Falzon wanted to make sure the franchise had a future before investing in a much-needed renovation. Meanwhile, he said he was told a competing supermarket had offered CW double the rent he was paying, now around $60,000, only to be denied.
Reached on the phone last Thursday (prior to the property being sold), Falzon confirmed he’d gotten an offer to leave early and that he wasn’t interested in doing so.

“We plan to stay unless something drastic happens,” he said. “As far as we’re concerned we’re here until the end of the lease.”

A renovation won’t happen, though, since Falzon said “it wouldn’t pay” for only two more years at the location.

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Residents sound off about noise

ST/PCV residents listen to Gerry Kelpin, the Department of Environmental Protections Environmental Compliance Unit director. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

ST/PCV residents listen to Gerry Kelpin, the Department of Environmental Protections Environmental Compliance Unit director. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Frustrations were high for Stuyvesant Town tenants attending a forum on noise while trying to come up with solutions for peace and quiet in the neighborhood. The main complaint from tenants at the meeting, held by the ST-PCV Tenants Association at the PS 40 auditorium, was the seeming lack of enforcement on the part of management about noise issues. Discussing the issue with a crowd of around 70 tenants were city experts on noise.

“People will call management then management will call public safety, but by the time public safety comes up they won’t hear the noise,” Tenants Association President Susan Steinberg said. “They say not to get involved with your neighbors so you have to wait for public safety but the next thing you know, it’s going on again.”

In response, Noise Activities Chair for GrowNYC.org Dr. Arline Bronzaft said that she disagreed that tenants shouldn’t approach their neighbors.

“You should know your neighbors,” she said. “If there’s a problem, we should be able to interact with each other.”

Other residents felt that the lack of enforcement was due to the non-compliance of many apartments on the 80/20 carpet rule, which states in Stuy Town leases that 80 percent of the floor must be covered by carpeting to mitigate noise between floors.

“Two of the last three tenants who have lived above me were not compliant with the carpeting rule,” resident Arlynne Miller said. “You have to get (management) to jump through unbelievable hoops to get them to comply.”

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Police Watch: Body found near NYU Langone, ‘Mugger’ arrested on East 23rd

BODY FOUND IN STORM DRAIN NEAR NYU LANGONE
This Tuesday around 11:39 a.m., police found an unconscious man inside a storm drain near East 33rd Street and First Avenue. The man was unconscious and unresponsive, police said. EMS soon arrived and pronounced the man deceased at the scene. The Medical Examiner will determine the cause of death and the investigation is ongoing. Police are withholding the man’s name pending proper family notification.

‘MUGGER’ ARRESTED ON EAST 23RD
Police arrested 33-year-old Bryan Fuge for robbery in front of 23 East 23rd Street last Saturday at 9:16 p.m. Police said that Fuge followed a woman along the sidewalk and when she entered a dimly lit area he allegedly charged at her and forcibly snatched her pocketbook, causing the strap to break. Police said that Fuge fled east, which wound up being towards four plainclothes officers.
An officer then identified himself by stating, “Police, don’t move,” and Fuge yelled and allegedly lowered his shoulder, ramming into the officers. Police said that he resisted arrest by shoving, striking and writhing around while maintaining possession of the bag. Police said that Fuge is a suspect in two other robberies in the 13th and 17th precincts and was currently on parole. He was charged with robbery, criminal possession of stolen property and resisting arrest.

WOMAN ARRESTED FOR ‘SWIPING’ PURSE AT PARK AVE. SOUTH AND EAST 22ND
Police arrested 31-year-old Jenea Osborne at the corner of Park Avenue South and East 22nd Street last Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. for grand larceny and possession of stolen property. The victim told police that she was eating a salad with her friend when someone came up to her and told her that he saw her bag get taken. She said that she had an iPad inside her bag. A witness told police that he saw Osborne walk into the store with a man who was behaving in a disorderly manner and he saw Osborne take the victim’s bag. The witness said that the man who was with Osborne left the store and came back briefly to make sure that no one was following her.
Officers later searched the area and put a description on the radio. Two officers were canvassing the uptown 6 train station and stopped Osborne since she fit the description. Police said that prior to the stop, they witnessed Osborne throw the black handbag into the train tracks. The witness made a positive ID of Osborne when she was arrested. The victim told police that she didn’t see her bag get taken but when the bag was recovered she said that it was hers.

MAN ARRESTED FOR ‘GROPING’ WOMAN ON 4 TRAIN
Police arrested 41-year-old Francisco Garcia at the Union Square subway station for sexual abuse last Friday at 12:18 p.m. Police said that Garcia was on a downtown 4 train, allegedly rubbing and pressing his groin area against the victim’s buttocks and hip multiple times.

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Letters to the Editor, Oct. 22

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Sick of Ave. C looking like Swiss cheese

A reader sent this letter to Town & Village last Tuesday about traffic problems during ongoing work along Avenue C. A response from the DOT and Con Ed follows.

Avenue C has been torn up for over three weeks, between at least 20th Street and 14th Street. I assume this is done by the DOT but I’m not certain of it.

In any case how can any responsible agency be permitted to tear up a major access road (this stretch serves as both means of entry and exit for the East River Drive) and leave it in the condition of a veritable mine field? It’s beyond reason. Traffic is slowed to a crawl and vehicles are swerving left and right to avoid major pot holes, exposed sewer covers and gas vents. (On what had been a level street to begin with, I traverse the area daily and there were no issues with this street.) Vehicle and pedestrian safety are severely compromised.

One evening last week, Con Edison employed the use of traffic cones and security guards on both 16th and 14th Streets to secure parking for their employees on the Stuyvesant Town perimeter. I believe this was done due to the congestion caused by no parking on Avenue C. Is this legal? And to top it off, that same night DOT (?) was tearing up the intersection at 14th Street and First Avenue.

What’s going on here? Why is our neighborhood being taxed so severely by poorly coordinated city services and an out of control power company? If street work is necessary, fine. Tear it up as needed but don’t leave it in this condition for weeks (months?) at a time.

Demolition/tear-up should not be permitted unless the repairs are to be made immediately. Is this so contractors can start as many jobs as possible and then get back to them when they see fit? Who is responsible for this? The public is not being well served.

Name withheld, ST

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