‘Sully’ films at Waterside

Clint Eastwood directed a newly white-haired Tom Hanks in a scene for “Sully” about heroic pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger at Waterside last Wednesday. (Photo via Waterside Plaza blog)

Clint Eastwood directed a newly white-haired Tom Hanks in a scene for “Sully” about heroic pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger at Waterside last Wednesday. (Photo via Waterside Plaza blog)

By Sabina Mollot

Last Wednesday evening, residents of Waterside Plaza got a sneak peek of the upcoming film, “Sully,” when director Clint Eastwood and actor Tom Hanks shot a scene at the property. Between the hours of 4 and 7 p.m. the scene was shot between 40 Waterside Plaza and the Water Club just north of the complex.

Hanks is playing heroic pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, who calmly saved his entire crew and over 150 passengers during a crash landing in the Hudson River in 2009 after the plane’s two engines failed. The incident became known as the “Miracle on the Hudson,” and the film is based on the autobiography, Highest Duty, by Sullenberger and Jeffrey Zaslow. The scene at Waterside called for a newly white-haired Hanks to jog alongside the East River.

Following the one-day shoot, a post about it appeared on the Waterside blog.

The post read, “The film crew used our Community Center as their green room so remember next time you visit for an event, you could be sitting in Clint Eastwood’s empty chair!”

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Here we go again: Stuy Town reported to be for sale

ST buildings

Stuyvesant Town buildings

By Sabina Mollot

Over five years after taking control of the property, CWCapital is preparing Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village for a sale, Bloomberg news reported on Saturday.

The article went on to name Blackstone Group LP as a likely bidder, with others possibly in the mix, though not Brookfield Asset Management. That company, which had announced a partnership with the ST-PCV Tenants Association four years ago with a plan for a non-eviction condominium conversion, is no longer involved, a rep for Brookfield said.

Meanwhile, it’s possible a future deal could secure $5-$6 billion. The latter figure would be more than the historic $5.4 billion paid by Tishman Speyer and partner BlackRock in 2006, with the article citing a strong residential market in Manhattan.

Additionally, the report said, “Blackstone’s real estate chief, Jon Gray, said this month that he was bullish on Manhattan rentals because it’s too costly for many residents to buy.”

Peter Rose, a spokesperson for Blackstone, did not immediately return a call requesting comment. Brian Moriarty, a spokesperson for CWCapital, did not respond to a request for comment.

UPDATE: Joe DePlasco, a spokesperson for CW, issued a statement on Monday, saying, “We are pleased that we have finalized in principle the settlement of the outstanding litigation. CWCapital retained Doug Harmon at Eastdil Secured to advise throughout the process.”

The statement from DePlasco didn’t elaborate on the terms of the settlement.

However, CW’s effort to sell has been hampered by a lawsuit filed by junior lenders represented by a company called Centerbridge Partners. The lenders had hoped for a chance to buy a key piece of the junior or mezzanine debt and accused CW of violating an intercreditor agreement when the servicer took title of the property through a deed last year instead of holding a foreclosure sale.

A spokesperson for EastDil didn’t immediately return a call requesting comment.

Susan Steinberg, the president of the ST-PCV Tenants Association, was out of town on Monday, and not available to be interviewed. Council Member Dan Garodnick, a Peter Cooper Village resident, was also unavailable for an interview on Monday morning.

However, he’d previously told Bloomberg, “The tenants are going to insist that the owners work directly with them and with the city to develop a responsible plan to protect the long-term affordability of the place.”

Garodnick has previously met with Mayor Bill de Blasio on a plan to maintain affordability in ST/PCV, that is, in the roughly 6,000 units that are still affordable. On Monday, Wiley Norvell, a spokesperson for the mayor, said the mayor still wanted to preserve affordability.

“Protecting this community’s legacy as a home for New York City’s middle class is a top priority for Mayor de Blasio,” Norvell said. “We will press any owner to preserve affordable housing.”

Andrew Willis, a spokesperson for Brookfield, confirmed that the company was “no longer in the process” of bidding, although he said he didn’t know the reason for the decision.

Johann Hamilton, a spokesperson for the Real Estate Board of New York, whose chair is Tishman Speyer president and CEO Rob Speyer, declined to comment.

This story will be updated.

Cop to artists at park: You’re not in ‘free speech zone’

Marieke Warmelink and Domenique Himmelsback de Vries sit at a booth offering free help as part of the Art in Odd Places festival. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Marieke Warmelink and Domenique Himmelsback de Vries sit at a booth offering free help as part of the Art in Odd Places festival. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

While Union Square Park is generally known as a mecca of free speech, whether it’s for protests, dancing Hare Krishnas or lone, boisterous characters who may or may not be performing, apparently, according to one police officer, not all of the park is zoned for said free speech.

Ed Woodham, the creator of the long-running Art in Odd Places festival, which takes place each October along 14th Street, said this year, he was made aware of a “designated free speech zone” in Union Square Park.

This was on Saturday, when a police sergeant made two of the participating artists get up from where they were sitting in the park at a small booth.

The reason, Woodham said he and the artists were told, was that they had to move to an area where free speech was allowed, which would be identified by a green coin on the ground.

Not knowing where this was, Woodham asked the cop, “Will you show it to me?” and said he was told in response, “Well, it’s really hard to find.”

Woodham added, “‘That’s why I asked you to show it to me.’ He couldn’t do it.”

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