Hoppy ending: Bunnies rescued from hoarder’s home are put up for adoption

One of the bunnies at an adoption event held at the former Police Academy building (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

One of the bunnies at an adoption event held at the former Police Academy building (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

About a dozen bunnies that were rescued from the home of an animal hoarder found new homes during an adoption event in the former Police Academy building on Saturday.

The 50 bunnies up for adoption at the event were just a small portion of the nearly 200 rabbits that had been rescued last January in Brooklyn from bunny hoarder Dorota Trec, who was arrested for animal cruelty. When the rabbits were rescued, Ani-Care Hospital in Pennsylvania took custody of 150 of the bunnies and St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center in New Jersey became responsible for 77. The total count of rabbits from the seizure was ultimately around 230 because some of the rabbits were pregnant at the time; the event last Saturday had at least one mother-daughter pair up for adoption.

The adoption event was hosted by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), Ani-Care Hospital and the NYPD.

Natasha Whitling of the ASPCA said that the use of the former Police Academy space was made possible through the ASPCA’s partnership with the NYPD, which still uses the building on East 20th Street as a candidate assessment center.

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Study: ST/PCV clearest neighborhood post-blizzard

An aerial view of Stuyvesant Town’s First Avenue Loop after the storm (Photo by Mark Thompson)

An aerial view of Stuyvesant Town’s First Avenue Loop after the storm (Photo by Mark Thompson)

By Sabina Mollot

In case anyone was wondering how Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper measured up with the rest of the city in terms of snow removal during last month’s “Snowmageddon,” the answer is that the roads and sidewalks were more ice-free than anywhere else.

More specifically, it got zero 311 complaints, according to a study by apartment listings company RentHop. In contrast, the East Village was the iciest and snowiest nabe in Manhattan, according to the study. The stats came from a 311 complaint count which was then adjusted to reflect the calls per square mile so that it wasn’t simply a matter of the biggest neighborhoods automatically being the worst offenders.

Shane Leese, a “data scientist” for RentHop, explained the adjustment seemed necessary considering that some neighborhoods in Queens which were two or three square miles long dwarfed many neighborhoods in Brooklyn, which then dwarfed many in Manhattan that were just a few square blocks. Additionally, the study noted that 311 complaints were not accepted while snow was still falling.

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