ST/PCV off limits to door knocking for pols, candidates

Ken Chanko, a Stuyvesant Town resident who’s door knocked during a number of political campaigns (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Ken Chanko, a Stuyvesant Town resident who’s door knocked during a number of political campaigns (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

Anyone thinking of volunteering for candidates running in the fall state elections should take note: Due to no solicitation rules, Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village apartments are verboten to would-be door knockers.

A Stuyvesant Town resident who’d been volunteering for the Bernie Sanders campaign recently learned this as the presidential primary heated up.

The volunteer, retired teacher Ken Chanko (also at one time a film columnist for this newspaper), told Town & Village it was the Sunday before the primary when he was told by a volunteer supervisor that his own apartment complex couldn’t be visited. That is, not until the campaign acquired a permit from the NYPD. Not only that, said Chanko, but the campaign hadn’t been informed of the need for a permit until late on Friday, meaning the crucial weekend before the primary would be lost.

“You couldn’t get a permit over the weekend,” he said.

It was while visiting a volunteer location on Avenue A when Chanko said he was told by the supervisor that “’something came up.’ Apparently you can’t go door to door.”

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VA: Flood wall now expected to be finished by end of 2016

The contractors working at the hospital site faced delays due to difficulties drilling through found materials like concrete and rocks and a tentative projected finish date for the project is the end of the year, with work on the Asser Levy Park side expected to be finished some time this summer. (Photo by Anne Greenberg)

The contractors working at the hospital site faced delays due to difficulties drilling through found materials like concrete and rocks and a tentative projected finish date for the project is the end of the year, with work on the Asser Levy Park side expected to be finished some time this summer. (Photo by Anne Greenberg)

By Sabina Mollot

Last August, Town & Village reported on how the project to build a flood wall outside the VA Medical Center was scheduled to be finished by March of this year.

However, as anyone who has walked past the construction site recently could see, the project is still ongoing and the actual wall hasn’t even been built yet.

This week, when asked the reason for the delay, a spokesperson for the VA blamed the delay on “unforeseen factors,” specifically a less than cooperative construction site.

Work on the part of the wall along Asser Levy Park is now expected to be finished this summer, according to “tentative projections,” the spokesperson, Claudie Benjamin, said. The walls and work along 23rd and 25th street is now expected to continue until the end of the calendar year. Benjamin added that once the work along Asser Levy Place is finished, the park, which is now partially blocked off, should be “like new” at some point in the summer.

As for the difficult work conditions, Benjamin said this was discovered during the excavation for the flood wall’s foundation.

“We found some unanticipated site conditions that required us to bring in archeological and architectural teams to review and opine that we were doing everything safe for the site and the local community and that we didn’t have any archeological sites of significance,” she said.

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Letters to the editor, Apr. 28

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Constant dribbling driving me crazy

Re: “Blackstone looking at ways to reduce noise,” T&V, Mar. 17

You were concerned enough to recently publish an article regarding the noise nuisances at Stuyvesant Town.  I am hoping you can stay on top of this.
It is outrageous to me that two full court basketball courts exist, from 9 a.m. to dusk (Playground 11), daily, directly below my building, 285 Avenue C, and several other buildings around the courts.

I am hoping you will continue to publish articles, op-ed pieces, etc., confer with our Tenants Association, and everything else possible to get them to severely cut the hours of operation, e.g. weekdays and weekends noon to 6 p.m.,  to eliminate one full court basketball court and add a second volley ball court, enforce a specific closing time by security, only allow one guest per resident, and enforce signs indicating no undue shouting, screaming, and cursing, which carries up to everyone’s windows.

I have spoken with at least 20 people in my building and others who feel the same as I do, that this is a clear noise nuisance, and violates the rules and regulations of our lease re: quiet enjoyment/noise.  To cater to a maximum of 25 kids and teens who use Playground 11 at any given time, compared to 30,000 residents, and eight 12-story buildings around the courts is simply absurd, inconsiderate, and off the charts.

Every weekday after work and all weekend, we are forced to listen to constant dribbling basketballs, shouting, screaming, cursing, clapping, etc., that under our lease, falls under “unreasonable disturbances…which are excessive and sustained for a long period.” If possible, I would have the basketball courts completely removed, and let them use the public courts which exist throughout our area.

We do not live on a college campus, school setting, country club, sports club, etc., and deserve as much peace and quiet throughout the day as logically possible.

Stuart Levinson, ST

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