Pride celebrated, Orlando remembered

Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel

Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

New York celebrated Pride this past Sunday with the annual parade on Fifth Avenue from 36th Street to the West Village. Police presence was increased at the event because of the mass shooting in Orlando two weeks ago and protesters at the Dyke March on Saturday noticed that community affairs officers for the NYPD were more vigilant than in previous years about keeping anti-gay protesters separated from participants at the march. The parade included solemn tributes to the victims of the massacre but participants were high-energy and as usual, didn’t hold back with their costumes. Some particularly timely outfits paid homage to the upcoming election with Donald Trump masks and signs about the candidates.

The float for Netflix series Orange Is The New Black was popular with the crowd, especially when cast members Natasha Lyonne and Lea DeLaria jumped off after 23rd Street to take selfies with fans for a few blocks.

Other participants included State Senator Brad Hoylman, Councilmember Corey Johnson, the NBA, the New York Civil Liberties Union, Facebook, the FDNY, Quakers of New York, Buzzfeed and Planned Parenthood. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton also made a surprise visit at the parade for four blocks in the Village, joining Governor Andrew Cuomo, Reverend Al Sharpton and Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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Tenants get 2nd rent freeze

Freeze is for 1-year leases, 2% hike for 2 years

Members of the Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village Tenants Association participate in a pre-vote rally. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Members of the Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village Tenants Association participate in a pre-vote rally. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Tenant advocates didn’t get the rent rollback they were hoping for but the Rent Guidelines Board did offer some relief with a freeze for one-year leases in their vote at Cooper Union’s Great Hall this past Monday night. Tenants signing two year leases will be getting a two-percent increase as a result of the vote.

The proposal, which Board Chair Kathleen Roberts presented after motions from both the tenant and landlord representatives failed, passed with a vote of 7-0, with the two owner representatives abstaining. The two percent increase and the freeze is the same proposal that passed at last year’s vote.

Prior to offering a proposal, owner representative Scott Walsh acknowledged the significance of the housing crisis in New York but suggested that there were other solutions, like rent credits for tenants paying more than half of their income in rent and the expansion of rent subsidy programs.

Walsh got the approval of the crowd, rare for an owner representative on the board, at the suggestion of increasing the income threshold on SCRIE and DRIE to $72,000 for two-person households and $63,000 for one-person households, but he was drowned out again by the yelling of protesters when he ultimately offered a proposal to increase one-year leases by three percent and two-year leases by five percent.

“This attempts to balance the needs of landlords and tenants,” he said. “Rent stabilization is not an official affordable housing program. Owners still need to account for costs.”

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Maloney wins primary with nearly 90% of vote

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and State Senator Brad Hoylman talk to voters outside Stuyvesant Town. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and State Senator Brad Hoylman talk to voters outside Stuyvesant Town. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On Tuesday, 23-year incumbent Carolyn Maloney easily won the Congressional Primary with over 89 percent of the vote.

Maloney’s Democratic opponent, Peter Lindner, got 9.55 percent of the vote or 1,435 votes with 1.32 percent of the voters, a total of 198, opting for write-in candidates. Maloney got exactly 89.13 or 13,389 votes.

The numbers came from the Board of Elections’ unofficial results made available from 99 percent of the scanners. In the 12th Congressional District, which includes much of Manhattan’s East Side and parts of Queens and Brooklyn, 15,022 registered Democrats came out to vote on what Maloney and poll workers Town & Village spoke with said seemed to be a typically low primary turnout.

Walking around Stuyvesant Town on Tuesday afternoon, T&V’s reporter only ran into people who said they’d be casting their vote for Maloney or wouldn’t say who they were voting for. One person though said he thought Lindner seemed promising.

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