More buses promised during L train shutdown

For Stuyvesant Town and East Village residents, a bright spot of the looming L train shutdown is a new subway entrance on Avenue A, as pictured here in a newly released rendering.

For Stuyvesant Town and East Village residents, a bright spot of the looming L train shutdown is a new subway entrance on Avenue A, as pictured here in a newly released rendering.

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Residents affected by the imminent L train closure got a visit from New York City Transit officials last Wednesday in a meeting organized by Community Board 3 and 6, held at Mount Sinai Beth Israel.

At the meeting, NYC Transit reps promised a beefed up bus fleet around Stuyvesant Town to deal with the planned L train shutdown.

Agency Operations Planning Chief Peter Cafiero said, “If there is no service in Manhattan, then we need to build up the bus fleet. We could be implementing what I’m calling the M14 SBS. It would serve Stuyvesant Town more directly by looping up to East 20th Street.”

This was the second of what the agency has said would be a number of meetings to both get feedback and inform the community about the planned shutdown, which won’t start until 2019. The agency also said at this recent meeting that they will be hosting a meeting some time in the fall just for Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village residents.

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Letters to the Editor, July 7

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Zero % increase for stabilized tenants

To the Editor:

I’ve been listening to several of my neighbors, all rent stabilized, and something doesn’t add up.

We’ve had three apartments in and out over the last several years. My current neighbors, finishing up their lease, pay twice as much as me.  Once they’re gone, the new occupant(s) may pay closer to three times as much as me.

And who would argue that this increase per apartment isn’t happening on every floor of every building in both Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village?

Now, if you take the average age of all the rent stabilized tenants, it’s got to be closer to 80 than 60. So given that management is making such an enormous vig on all of the many new tenants, why wouldn’t the stabilized tenants be stabilized at their rents permanently? Management isn’t going to buy them out.

There’s no other stabilized housing in the city where half of the stock is luxury at unlimited turnover at unregulated increases.

Rentals to new tenants is tantamount to scooping up money with both hands. Raises to stabilized guidelines is tantamount to picking up bottles for their return deposits.

Zero increase for the lifetime of Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village’s stabilized tenants.

Billy Sternberg, ST

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