Stuy Town holds menorah lighting

 

Phoyos by Maya Rader

Phoyos by Maya Rader

By Maya Rader

Stuy Town residents celebrated Hanukkah, Festival of Lights, at the Oval on Wednesday evening. The event was kicked off by East End Temple Rabbi Dennis Ross giving a blessing and lighting the candles on a menorah constructed on the Oval lawn.

After the lighting, attendees enjoyed cider, hot chocolate and doughnuts provided by Five Stuy Café. Yosi, from the band Yosi and the Superdads, played Hanukkah-themed music. Children gathered around him and danced to songs like “I Have a Little Dreidel.”

Children also decorated their own menorah-shaped napkin holders at a table nearby. The young event attendees were also treated to toy dreidels and gelt.

 

Continue reading

Advertisements

Quik Park proposes new policy on payment

Quik Park, which operates the parking garages in STPCV, recently announced that customers would face a fee unless they enrolled in the online payment plan that automatically charges the monthly bill to a credit card or bank account, but Councilmember Dan Garodnick said his office has learned that this new policy will not be implemented.

Councilmember Garodnick sent a letter to StuyTown general manager Rick Hayduk and Quik Park CEO Rafael Llopiz on Wednesday regarding the new proposed policy, arguing that online payment would adversely affect the high senior population in STPCV. Garodnick noted that concerns about the proposed policy were especially high given that Quik Park had also increased its rates earlier this year.

Llopiz did not respond to a request for comment on the policy. Councilmember Garodnick’s letter to Llopiz and Hayduk is below.

Continue reading

2016: The year in review

By Sabina Mollot

It’s been said that all news is local and this year that could even be said about major news coverage ranging from the presidential election to a terrorist attack to a now infamous hate crime hoax.

Read on for T&V’s roundup of the top 10 local news developments (and stories with a local impact) of the year.

Mount Sinai Beth Israel (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Mount Sinai Beth Israel (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

1. After rumors swirled of an impending closure, the administration of Mount Sinai Beth Israel announced that it would be downsizing the hospital, which has over 800 beds, to a much smaller one with 70 beds and an outpatient care model. The main campus across from Stuyvesant Town on First Avenue, deemed too old and costly to bring up to modern specifications (a renovation estimate was $1.3 billion) would eventually be put on the market. However, hospital brass has said this would only happen following the building of a new hospital adjacent to the Eye and Ear Infirmary on East 14th Street. The rebuild, estimated to cost around $500,000, is a process that has already begun with improvements to existing facilities like the ambulatory center in Union Square. In related news, Beth Israel’s president Suzanne Somerville recently stepped down, while a Peter Cooper Village doctor, Jeremy Boal, has been named the president of Mount Sinai Downtown. This includes Beth Israel and the Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Continue reading