Opinion: Trumpcare is no care bill at all

By Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney

Last week, House Republicans voted to rob millions of Americans of affordable healthcare when they passed the so-called American Health Care Act, also known as Trumpcare. This bill, should it become law, will devastate our healthcare system, drive up healthcare costs, and cause enormous harm to millions of American families. It also has several pieces that single out New York, making it particularly harmful to our state. That’s why dozens of medical associations, patient advocates and public health experts joined me and every single Democrat in the House to oppose this bill and it’s why I hope this bill goes nowhere in the U.S. Senate.

Trumpcare is probably one of the most damaging and devastating bills to pass the House during my time in Congress. It will result in at least 24 million Americans, including 2.7 million New Yorkers, losing their healthcare coverage. For those that do not lose coverage, Trumpcare dramatically increases your out-of-pocket health costs – including premiums, deductibles, and other copays. The average marketplace enrollee will see costs rise by $3,174 in 2020 and individuals with incomes below 250 percent of the poverty line will see their costs increase by $4,815.

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Letters to the editor, May 11

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

How city can help small businesses

This letter was originally published on town-village.com as a comment to the story, “Garodnick: Commercial Rent Tax Bill would hardly cost the city anything,” T&V, May 4.

Instead of doing this tax reduction by increasing the amount paid on the leasehold, it should be based on each proprietor’s, LLC member’s, partner’s, or S Corp shareholder’s distributive share of rent expense. Why should the sole proprietor paying $300,000 in rent be exempt from the CRT when the competing store down the block with two partners which pays $600,000 (i.e., $300,000 each from each partner) be exempt?

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Moms we interviewed said they don’t want stuff on Mother’s Day

By Sabina Mollot

With Mother’s Day taking place on Sunday, May 14, Town & Village’s email inboxes have been flooded with press releases from various companies that are all convinced what moms want just happens to be what they manufacture and sell.

However, based on responses we got from women about what it is they actually want for Mother’s Day, it turns out all the PR people who pitched us were wrong. Those we spoke with, while they watched their kids at playgrounds or just strolled with strollers through Stuyvesant Town, said what they want is some quality family time. Others admitted they could use some much needed time to themselves.

Shorn Burke, a mother of a 12-year-old and a seven-year-old, said she needed the latter. “Rest,” said Burke, without hesitation, saying she worked long hours as a babysitter. “A peaceful day. A quiet day. Just relaxation.”

Kate Raizenberg, an interior designer, when asked, said she would be happy with any kind of effort.

“Anything,” she said, “but,” she added, “I know I’m not getting anything.” With her one child being a baby, she instead is hoping for a chance to sleep in and would also like for her family to take her to brunch. “That’s what I’d like to do,” she decided.

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