Mind the gap

ST/PCV moms share tales of toddlers’ hands getting stuck in elevators doors

By Sabina Mollot

If your young child ever got his or her hand stuck behind the door of an elevator, you’re not alone.

Two weeks ago, a Stuyvesant Town toddler broke her finger after her hand got stuck into a gap in the moving elevator door in her building. Then, after it happened, the girl’s mother posted a warning to other parents on a local Facebook group, only to then hear from several other parents that the same thing had happened to their children over the years, in Stuyvesant Town as well as other places.

The girl’s mom also later spoke to Town & Village about the incident, which she was shocked to learn was a relatively common occurrence.

The mother, who asked that her name not be used, said on September 21, she and her daughter arrived on the T level in her building and when the elevator door opened, the girl put her hand on the inside of the door.

“I lunged, but not fast enough,” her mom said. When the door opened fully, it pulled the girl’s hand into the gap that hides the inner door, trapping her hand into a very narrow space. After a few minutes of pulling and screaming (on both the mother and daughter’s parts), they were able to get the girl’s hand free. A trip to NYU Langone confirmed that her ring finger had been broken.

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Gramercy block is co-named for former Children’s Court building

(Pictured L-R) Some of the project committee members gather at the sign unveiling: Claude L. Winfield; Judge Andrea Masley; Lois Rakoff; Tiffany Townsend; Dr. Samuel D. Albert; Louise Dankberg; Molly Hollister; Michelle Deal Winfield; Dr. David Christy, provost of Baruch College; and Council Member Rosie Mendez (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On Sunday afternoon, a crowd of around 30 people, mostly community activist types, gathered at the northwest corner of East 22nd Street and Third Avenue for a ceremony to co-name the block “Children’s Court Way.”

The project was in the works for the past two years, and was the idea of East Midtown Plaza resident Michelle Deal Winfield.

The Children’s Court used to be located on East 22nd Street, in what is now home to Baruch College’s Steven L. Newman Real Estate Institute. Today, there is just a bit of lingering evidence as to what the building’s prior purpose was, like the marble water drinking fountain built specifically for a child’s height, as well as some of the stairs in the building that are four and a half inches high instead of the standard eight.

According to Gramercy: Its Architectural Surroundings, a book published by the Gramercy Neighborhood Associates in 1996, a court for children was first established in Manhattan in the former Department of Public Charities Building on Third Avenue and 11th Street. This was in response to a push by reformers to treat juvenile delinquents differently from adult criminals and take their family circumstances into account. However, this court, a division of The Court of Special Sessions, was still required by law to treat children in the same manner as adults.

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Letters to the editor, Oct. 5

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Dog runs need owners to pitch in

Re: “Dog owners say lack of open space the biggest challenge” and “Redesigned dog run in the works for Madison Sq. Park,” T&V “Dog Days” issue, Sept. 21

As an individual charged with attempting to administer the Union Square Dog Run (U-Dog), I found several comments in the two stories worthy of further pursuit:

 In the Madison Square story Ms. Munoz says she doesn’t bring her dog into the run because of the smell. Can’t resist a remark here — where does Li Li pee that she mops it up or does she realize she spreads the same smells around town for all pedestrians and children by going around the run?

Ms. Dang said she passes U-Dog up to go to Madison Square because our run smells worse due to the surface. The surfaces are the same! As is Washington Square.

But she also adds her preference that she likes paving options because “Concrete is easier to clean.” I always wonder, who do all these people think “cleans” the run? There is no service out there, the owners either pitch in and monthly pour cleansers and water or they let rain do it.

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