Garodnick bill for ‘potty parity’ passed by City Council

The legislation would affect new and newly renovated buildings.

By Sabina Mollot

A “potty parity” bill, pushing for new and renovated buildings to offer changing tables in bathrooms accessible to men as well as women, was passed in the City Council on December 11.

The mayor held a hearing on the bill on Monday and is expected to sign it soon, according to one of the legislation’s co-sponsors, Dan Garodnick. The other sponsor is Brooklyn Council Member Rafael Espinal, who said he got to work on the bill after witnessing a man change his daughter’s diaper on the sink of a public bathroom.

“Moms and dads should have equal access to sanitary and safe spaces when changing their baby’s diapers,” he said.

Meanwhile, Garodnick, who has two young sons, can certainly relate.

“As a dad who has changed my fair share of diapers I can say from personal experience that there are very few restrooms with diaper changing stations and it shouldn’t be that way,” he said.

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Hotel 17 reopens with ‘extended stay’ model

Hotel 17 shut down regular hotel operations to comply with the Illegal Hotels Law. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

Hotel 17, the Stuyvesant Square budget hotel that closed in April due to zoning issues, has recently reinvented itself as an extended stay hotel.

The 160-room hotel, which is located at 225 East 17th Street, notes on its website in several places that it’s now “extended stay,” meaning guests must book a room for 30 days or longer.

Doing this keeps the building, which was never actually zoned as a hotel, in compliance with the city’s Illegal Hotels Law. The law forbids buildings that are zoned as residential from renting units for under 30 days. Hotel 17 operated openly as a hotel for decades but a few years ago found itself in trouble with the city upon a crackdown on short-term rentals.

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Letters to the editor, Dec. 21

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Nightmare on East 14th Street

We were all aware of the closing down of the L train in 2019 due to repairs required in the tunnel damaged in superstorm Sandy. This was a known fact to our community and the entire city. However, we were not aware of the construction that would start a few months back building an entrance to the L First Avenue station on Avenue A, as it was almost impossible to find room on the platform.

In any event, about 4-6 months ago, we noticed bus stops were being moved and a lot of fencing was being put  up. Then we realized, this is it; the construction would start on a subway entrance to the L train on 14th Street and  Avenue A. Instead of being good news, it became difficult to get past the construction site, the noise, the dust, the trucks the workmen standing around, causing causing smoke, litter, clutter as even if our neighborhood is not crowded enough.

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