Man allegedly slashes co-worker in front of Union Square Liquiteria

Slashing suspect

By Sabina Mollot

Cops are looking for a man who allegedly slashed his coworker in the face in front of the Liquiteria juice shop where they worked at 26 East 17th Street.

Police say Leonard Jackson and the victim had gotten into an argument over a lock on a door when things turned physical and Jackson allegedly attacked him. Police say the victim had to get 40 stitches on his face.

Jackson’s last known address is on Wortman Avenue in Brooklyn and he has been arrested six times in Brooklyn. However, those cases are sealed.

Jackson is described as black, about 200 lbs. with black, short hair and brown eyes. Anyone with information about his whereabouts is asked to call detectives at the 13th Precinct at (212) 477-7444.

A phone number for Liquiteria’s Union Square West location wasn’t working on Tuesday.

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Sandy-related construction still ongoing at VA Medical Center

Work includes replacing elevators along with the entire electrical system as part of a $207 million federal relief package. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

It was over five years ago when Superstorm Sandy flooded much of Manhattan’s East Side, crippling hospitals in Bedpan Alley. But it was the VA Medical Center on East 23rd Street that fared the worst, closing for six months.

Today, thanks to $207 million in federal relief money, the veterans’ hospital, while fully operational, is still undergoing work to replace systems that need to be upgraded rather than just repaired in the event of a future catastrophe.

Martina Parauda, director of VA NY Harbor Healthcare System (which includes local facilities including the Manhattan one), spoke to veterans about some of the ongoing projects at a town hall meeting on Tuesday morning.

The massive floodwall that began construction in 2015 is mostly done, including parts that can’t be seen like underwater pumps. It was originally supposed to be completed in 2016, but the VA has previously said underground excavation proved to be more complicated than expected.

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