Teen arrested for second sex crime at Washington Irving

Washington Irving High School, pictured in 2016 (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

A student arrested for a rape at the Washington Irving campus at 40 Irving Place last December allegedly had sex with another teenage girl without her consent less than four months after he was allowed to return to the school, police sources told Town & Village last week.

Gramercy Arts High School student Jevon Martin, 18, was charged with sexual misconduct and endangering the welfare of a child at the end of April after a 15-year-old student came forward and told police that on March 26, Martin allegedly put his fingers in her genitals. At this point, police said she told him, “No,” and he reportedly proceeded to have sex with her without her consent. Police said that this incident, like the incident in December, took place in a stairwell in the school building.

According to 13th precinct Deputy Inspector Steven Hellman, Martin made bail after his second arrest but was not allowed back in the Washington Irving campus since then and is currently in a program at an Alternative Learning Center while he waits on an expulsion hearing.

Alternative Learning Centers, managed by the Office of Safety and Youth Development in the Department of Education, provide classes for middle and high school students who are on suspension longer than five days.

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NY Infirmary for Women and Children founder honored with plaque

Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, speaks at the plaque unveiling. (Photo by Harry Bubbins)

On Monday, Elizabeth Blackwell, who founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children, the first hospital to be run by and for women, was commemorated with the unveiling of a historic plaque at 58 Bleecker Street. Blackwell was also the first woman doctor in America.

The Greenwich Village address was chosen because it was the original site of the infirmary, which was later moved to East 15th Street in Stuyvesant Square. The infirmary in more recent years was incorporated into New York-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital. The infirmary had originally operated out of a house that’s still standing, though it was originally numbered 64 Bleecker Street.

Built in 1822-1823, the Federal style house was erected for James Roosevelt, the great-grandfather of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who lived there until his death just ten years before Blackwell embarked on her groundbreaking effort. Blackwell’s hospital opened on May 12, 1857, the 37th birthday of Florence Nightingale, whom Blackwell had befriended earlier in her career. The hospital was open seven days a week and provided medical care for needy women and children free of charge.

Monday’s plaque unveiling, which took place almost 161 years to the day after the infirmary opened, was organized by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.

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Opinion: Felder overplays his hand

By former Assmeblyman Steven Sanders

Brooklyn State Senator Simcha Felder is a Democrat. But for reasons best known to him, he has been caucusing with the Republicans in Albany to help enable that Party to maintain control of the State Senate in spite of having fewer members than the Democrats.

But that’s not where the story ends. Last month, the seven Democratic members who have made up the so called “Independent Democratic Caucus” for the past number of years, reluctantly returned to the reservation. That leaves the Senate composition at 32 Democrats and 31 Republicans. Governor Cuomo for years tacitly accepted that odd political marriage because he felt it worked to his advantage. He no longer thinks so. He has been pressured from the left, and from his primary opponent Cynthia Nixon, to stand up for Democrats. So he suddenly got involved and brokered a deal amongst the Senate Democrats.

But with Felder’s continued affiliation with the Republicans, they will maintain Senate control for the rest of this year. In exchange for Mr. Felder’s support, the Republicans have given him legislative perks and pivotal voting deference. But as the current session winds down and the November elections loom large and soon, Mr. Felder’s political strategy may need rethinking.

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