Police Watch: Men arrested for thefts from Trader Joe’s, Arrest for alleged robbery

MEN ARRESTED FOR THEFTS FROM TRADER JOE’S
Police arrested 62-year-old Albert Citro and 23-year-old Kyle Charles for allegedly stealing from customers inside Trader Joe’s on Wednesday, June 19 at 1:55 p.m.

Police said that Citro was seen removing a clutch wallet from a purse that was on top of a shopping cart inside the store at 620 Sixth Avenue while Charles allegedly acted as a lookout. Citro allegedly concealed the wallet inside a bag and met Charles outside the store. Police said that Citro and Charles were also seen on video from a previous incident when they allegedly used a stolen credit card in the store.

Citro and Charles were arrested at the corner of West 20th Street and Sixth Avenue and were charged with petit larceny and possession of stolen property.

Police said that Citro also stole a wallet from a shopping cart inside the store on June 16 at 4:30 p.m., on June 9 at 12:05 p.m. and on June 5 at 3:45 p.m. Another woman told police that her wallet was missing from the bag that she was carrying on June 15 around noon.

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Opinion: The difference maker

By former Assemblymember Steven Sanders

It has often be said that elections have consequences. That statement was never truer than last week in Albany.

 You may recall that Brian Kavanagh, after serving for ten years in the State Assembly, in a district that I represented for almost three decades, ran for an open State Senate seat in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn two years ago. He was elected. But of even greater significance, the State Senate became a Democratic Party majority this year after the 2018 November elections. Senator Kavanagh became chairman of the Senate Housing Committee. That was important because all the New York City tenant protections laws would lapse this year and would need to be debated once again.

 For over half a century the State Senate majority was in the hands of the Republican Party almost without interruption and mostly represented by upstate and suburban legislators. For all those years the Senate was commonly referred to as the place where progressive tenant protection and rent regulation reforms went to die. I can personally attest to that.

During my years in the State Assembly, I introduced dozens of affordable housing bills designed to protect tenants from unfair and excessive rent increases and other protections as well. They routinely passed in the Assembly but rarely if ever were even allowed to be voted upon in the State Senate. Did that fact have anything to do with the other fact, which was that Republican senators received millions of dollars in campaign contributions from the real estate industry? Well, nobody can say for certain, but neither do I believe in coincidences like that. My counterpart in the State Senate, Roy Goodman, was frequently rebuffed by his own leadership in trying to advance these bills. In those days, Roy was only one of a couple of other Republican senators who represented large communities of tenants in New York State. So try as he did, he was stymied at every turn.

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