Police Watch: Man arrested for ‘subway surfing,’ Pair busted for marijuana outside Peter Cooper Village

MAN ARRESTED FOR ‘SUBWAY SURFING’

Police arrested 23-year-old Isaiah Thompson on Friday, August 2 at 8:50 p.m. after he allegedly rode on the outside of an uptown 5 train in Union Square the previous Wednesday, July 31 at 6:35 p.m. Gothamist reported on Monday that witnesses alerted police at the station, prompting Thompson to allegedly flee into the tunnel. Thompson was charged with criminal trespassing and reckless endangerment.

T&V previously reported in May that Thompson was arrested for allegedly pulling the emergency brake on the 2 train and police were still investigating whether or not Thompson was connected to a number of other incidents in which someone pulled the brake.

Police said that in the incident this May, Thompson gained access to the rear of the 2 train while it was in the West 14th Street/Seventh Avenue station. He allegedly opened the rear door and rode for several stops on the outside of the train car, then reportedly activated the train’s emergency brake.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Longtime Stuyvesant Town resident dies at 97

Beatrice Nava

Beatrice Nava, a long-time Stuyvesant Town resident, passed away peacefully on Monday, July 29, at age 97 in her apartment. She is lovingly remembered and already missed by those and her grandchildren, extended family, neighbors, friends and even her doctors.

Born in Philadelphia, she lived in that area and taught for many years before relocating to Mexico for several years with an extended stay in Nicaragua, before returning to the US and settling in New York City in 1984.

She got her B.A. and M.A. from Bryn Mawr (in 1943 and 1964, respectively). She prided herself on her social awareness and activism, and was even arrested in Washington Square Park for protesting police brutality. On another occasion, she was protesting the Vietnam War in Washington, DC, and happened to run into her son, Ed.

She was an avid reader, never missing a day of the New York Times and other important publications like the New Yorker. She contributed her story to the book, Written Out of History: Memoirs of Ordinary Activists. She enjoyed the company of a wide range of friends, both in person and via computer, as she mastered the digital age of email.

She is survived by her four children (Ed, Joan, Jim, and Maggie) and her cat (Esperanza).