Around and About

CONCERTS 

THIRD STREET MUSIC SCHOOL SERIES—LiveSOUNDS presents free performances by faculty and their guests most Fridays at Third Street Music School from October to March. Concerts take place Friday evenings at 7 p.m. at the Anna Maria Kellen Auditorium at 235 E. 11th St. between Second and Third Aves. Third Street and its auditorium are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit thirdstreetmusicschool.org.

May 17, guitar Studio recital with Giacomo Baldello.

May 24, Spring Dance Recital III and IV. (Recitals I and II are on Thurs., May 23 at 7 p.m.) 

FOLK/POLITICAL/SOCIAL CONCERT SERIES—The Peoples’ Voice Café, an alternative coffeehouse, organizes weekly concerts and events celebrating humanitarian issues and concerns. The cafe is run as a not-for-profit collective and concerts are held Saturdays from 8-10:30 p.m. at The Community Church of New York Unitarian Universalist, 40 E. 35th St. (between Madison and Park Aves. Wheelchair-accessible). Suggested donation: $20; $12 for PVC members; more if you choose; less if you can’t; no one turned away. For more information, call (212) 787-3903 or visit peoplesvoicecafe.org.

May 18, Greenwich Village folk pioneer Carolyn Hester. This will be the final concert of the season until September.

THEATER

DRAMA—Sea Dog Theater presents Chris Cragin-Day’s “The Rare Biosphere,” a 21-performance limited engagement at Calvary St. George’s, 61 Gramercy Park North. Performances could continue through Sun., May 19. Directed by award-winning Christopher Domig. Sophie, a Honduran-American teenager, comes home from high school to find that her parents have been deported. She immediately goes into bunker-down survival mode, trying to care for her younger siblings without raising suspicion and considering her next move. Her plan is complicated when Steven, a well-meaning friend, oblivious to the issues she’s facing, discovers and struggles to comprehend her situation. The play draws a parallel between our current immigration crisis with the beauty and necessity of diversity in our ecosystem, offering a unique underrepresented perspective into a broken system that many of us only experience through news reports. Performances are Wed.-Sat. at 8 p.m. and also 3 p.m. on Sat. Tickets are $30 ($20 for students) and available at seadogtheater.org. Tickets may also be purchased in-person at the venue 30 minutes prior to show time. Call ahead for availability at (646) 463-0542.

19th CENTURY DRAMA REVIVAL—Metropolitan Playhouse, 220 E. 4th St., revives an original tale of financial sin, Dion Boucicault’s “The Poor of New York,” running through May 19. Artistic director Alex Roe directs. In a desperate bid to save his own family from the Financial Panic of 1837, banker Gideon Bloodgood seizes the fortune of a dying sea captain. Twenty years on, when another crisis hits the markets, Bloodgood is among the wealthy New Yorkers who have learned to prosper off others’ losses. But as he grows richer, the captain’s family sinks deeper into poverty, as do a wealthy heir, a wily thief, and the immigrant family who tie them all together. Will an unexpected hero be able to save them all from their private torments? Only if he survives the spectacular tenement fire in Act V. While the pathos is sentimental, the comedy is ironic, the characters conflicted, the critique knowing, and the writing distinctive for Boucicault’s verbal wit. Metropolitan’s production includes period song, sung a cappella. Performances are Thurs.-Sat. at 7:30 p.m.; Sun. at 3 p.m. plus, Tues., May 7 and 14 at 7 p.m. and Wed., May 8 and 15 at 3 p.m. Tickets, $30 general admission, $25 students/seniors, and $10 children 18 and under, can be purchased online at metropolitanplayhouse.org or by calling 800-838-3006. 

SOLO SHOW/COMEDY—Horse Trade presents “I’m Just Kidneying,” on Sun., May 19, June 2 and June 16 at 6 p.m. at Under St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl. Amanda donated her kidney for her sister. But she wasn’t a match. Yet, she saved two lives. Sounds like an incredibly heroic sacrifice, but Amanda loves attention. From carrying her urine on the NYC subway to enduring needle-happy nurses to passing resounding farts, this Award-winning comedy questions what it takes to be a “hero.” For tickets, $10, visit horsetrade.info. 

STAGED READING—National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents a staged reading of “The Fishing Play” by John Lahr, Directed by John Hancock on Mon., May 20 at 8 p.m.

In “The Fishing Play,” two middle-aged Yalies, whose lives and careers have taken different turns, chew over old privileged times as they troll for pike. Then the Big One hits – and it’s more than a fish. RSVP required: theatre@thenationalartsclub.org.

DRAMA—The Irish Repertory Theatre, 132 W. 22nd St., presents “The Shadow of a Gunman” by Sean O’Casey on the Francis J. Greenburger Mainstage, running through May 25. Director is Ciarán O’Reilly. It’s 1921, and the Irish War of Independence rages on the streets of Dublin as Irish revolutionaries clash with British auxiliary forces. Aspiring poet Donal Davoren tries to avoid the conflict, but when Donal learns of a rumor that he is a gunman on the run, he cannot resist the curiosity it stirs in beautiful young Minnie Powers… and he cannot escape the attention of his other neighbors. As the rumor grows, the war outside moves closer to home with tragic consequences. “The Shadow of a Gunman” premiered at The Abbey Theatre in 1923 to immediate success, establishing Sean O’Casey’s career as a playwright at age 43. This work was last seen at Irish Rep in 1999. To purchase tickets, $70 ($50 for rear seating), or for more information, visit irishrep.org or call (212) 727-2737. Performances are Wed. and Sat. at 3 and 8 p.m., Tues. and Thurs. at 7 p.m., Fri. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 3 p.m.

MUSICAL COMEDY SOLO SHOW—Horse Trade presents comedian Maggie Lalley’s performance of “Cold Blooded Witch: The Sex Musical” from May 30-June 1 at 8 p.m. each night at Under St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl. This is a one-woman, original musical comedy about Lalley’s demented journey through teen witchcraft and sexuality. This show premiered at the Solocom Festival at the People’s Improv Theater in 2018, and was selected for the Edinburgh Fringe Festival this summer. Lalley performs stand up, improv, and musical comedy all over New York City. For tickets, $10, visit horsetrade.info.

STAGED READING/LGBT THEME—Scandinavia House, 58 Park Ave. at E. 38th St., in partnership with Scandinavian American Theater Company, presents a free, staged reading of Iceland playwright Hávar Sigurjónsson’s “Our Boy /Strakur Okkar,” on Thurs., May 30 at 7 p.m. “Our Boy” explores the relationships between a mother, a father, their homosexual son, and his boyfriend. Through a series of isolated scenes of various lengths, themes like machismo, love and longing, sex, upbringing, and marriage are explored with an equal amount of seriousness and humor. “Our Boy /Strakur Okkar” premiered at the National Theatre of Iceland in January 2003. RSVP through a link at scandinaviahouse.org.

COMEDY—Theater for the New City, 155 First Ave. at E. 10th St., presents “Zen A.M.,” a new comedy by Natalie Menna May 31-June 16. The play is a story of laughable characters straining to act rationally when faced with difficult decisions of artistic integrity.  Bruno, a 9/11 survivor, has abandoned his lucrative Wall Street career to pursue his lifelong dream of becoming a painter. However, money is running out and his jealous, excitable yet pragmatic girlfriend — a fact-checker for a right wing media outlet — is set on getting married. The play is light farce with the theme that Americans will never agree about anything because we have become too divided, but its deeper theme is the price of artistic integrity. Performances are Thurs., Fri. and Sat. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 3 p.m. For more information or tickets, ($18) visit theaterforthenewcity.net or call (212) 254-1109. 

DRAMA—Daryl Roth Theatre’s DR2 Theatre, 103 E. 15th St., presents “Accidentally Brave,” written and performed by Maddie Corman. Directed by Kristin Hanggi, the play is based on the true story of when Corman’s life fell apart following the arrest of her husband on child pornography charges. It’s about discovering a new normal, challenging perceptions and will leave audience members wondering what they would do. It explores what it means to navigate a world with no certainty. For tickets, $55-$100 and available through July, or for more information, visit accidentallybrave.com.

OTHER PERFORMANCES

DANCE—Theater for the New City’s Johnson Theater, 155 First Ave. at E. 10th St., presents “ɪˈreɪʒə (Erasure),” Vangeline Theater and the New York Butoh Institute’s production running May 16-19. “ɪˈreɪʒə (Erasure)” is the second installment of a performance triptych by butoh artist Vangeline. The 60-minute solo explores butoh techniques of erasure, as well as the phenomenon of female erasure taking place in our society. Butoh has often explored techniques of self-erasement, and butoh dancers aim at reaching a form of “emptiness.” For the first time in butoh’s history, this phenomenon will be put to the test: the rehearsal process will be scientifically recorded with the help of MUSE 2, a device capable of recording brain wave activity. Erasure predominantly explores the Delta Brain wave activity in movement (.5-4Hz), a slow wave usually characteristic of “dreamless sleep.” Vangeline Theater/New York Butoh Institute aims to preserve the legacy and integrity of Japanese Butoh, which originated post-World War II as a reaction to the loss of identity caused by the westernization of Japanese culture, as well as a realization that ancient Japanese performing traditions no longer spoke to a contemporary audience. Performances Thurs.-Sat. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 3 p.m. Tickets for the performance are $15 general admission and can be purchased at theaterforthenewcity.net.

Horse Trade presents “Jason Sturkey and His Orchestra,” a cabaret/burlesque/variety show at Under St. Marks on Wed., May 22 at 6:30 p.m.

COMEDY—Theater at the 14th Street Y, 344 E. 14th St., presents “#Nastywomen,” a female resistance comedy series, next on stage on Mon., May 20 at 7:30 p.m. For the seventh show, audience favorites from previous shows are being brought back along with new comedians. Lineup includes Becca Blackwell, Emmy Blotnick, Ars Poetica, and host Amanda Duarte. New performers are performers Brittany Carney and Tessa Skara. Tickets, $30, are available at 14streety.org or by calling (646) 395-4310. 

VARIETY—Horse Trade presents “Jason Sturkey and His Orchestra,” a cabaret/burlesque/variety show at Under St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl., next on Wed., May 22 at 6:30 p.m. Imagine if the Mister Rogers show had been hosted by your drunk gay uncle, featuring talented performers you’ve never heard of. This new cabaret show is happening every fourth Wednesday of the month. Tickets, $12, can be purchased online at horsetrade.info. 

“WORD The Storytelling Show!” presents its next show at Pangea, on Wed., May 22 at 8 p.m. Lineup includes Adrien Behn (pictured) and others.

STORYTELLING—“WORD The Storytelling Show!” presents its next show at a new venue, Pangea, 178 Second Ave. and 11th St. on Wed., May 22 at 8 p.m. Lineup includes Sandi Marx, David Dean Bottrell, Adrien Behn, Tracey Starin, David Lawson, Laura Maltz, Vicki Juditz and Music with Dana Carmel. Tickets, $10 online at brownpapertickets.com or $15 cash at door. All drinks and food $12 minimum per person. Doors open 7:15 p.m. for food, drinks and seats. 

BURLESQUE—Horse Trade Theater Group presents “Stand Up and Take Your Clothes Off” on Sun., June 2 at 8 p.m. at The Kraine theater, 85 E. 4th St. This is a fast paced, sexy show that each month features NYC’s funniest female comics and sassiest burlesque acts. Hosted by Kerryn Feehan and Jillaine Gill with DJ Stevie C and Stage Kitten Stockholm Filly. Cover is $15 ($10 in advance online). For more information or to purchase tickets in advance visit horsetrade.info.

FAMILY/CHILDREN 

EVENTS AT LIBRARY FOR BABIES, TODDLERS AND OLDER CHILDREN—New York Public Library’s Epiphany Library, 228 E. 23rd St. between Second and Third Aves., presents the following programs for children:

“Color Time.” Crayons and coloring pages will be available in the children’s room on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3-5 p.m.

“Baby & Toddler Story Time: Bitty Book Buddies” followed by open play on Mon., May 20 at 12:30 p.m., Wed., May 22 and 29 at 12:30 p.m. and Fri., May 24 at 10:30 a.m. This is an interactive program for babies and toddlers ages 0-36 months. Hear stories, sing songs, play with puppets and make new friends. Limited to 30 children. First come, first served, no latecomers. Music and toys will be provided before and after the program.

“Pixelcraft” on Tues., May 21 at 3:30 p.m. Children 5-12 will use Perler Beads on pegboards to make any Pixelcraft image they want and take it home. They can choose from a variety of bead templates and regular or glow-in-the-dark bead. Note: Ironing of completed images is done by library staff only.  Program takes place in the Community Room. No pre-registration necessary.

“Bracelet making” on Fri., May 24 at 3:15 p.m. Make One, Take One: Bracelet Making-Beading. Children ages 5-10 will make a colorful beaded bracelet. This program will take place in the third floor community room. No registration required.

“Playtime Party” on Tues., May 28 at 10 a.m. Open playtime for babies and toddlers ages 0-3.

For more information, visit nypl.org or call (212) 679-2645.

THEATER—Theater at the 14th Street Y, 344 E. 14th St between First and Second Aves., and The Rebel Playhouse present “Old Turtle and the Broken Truth,” running through May 19. In “Old Turtle and the Broken Truth,” a truth falls like a star from the sky and breaks into two pieces. When the villagers discover only half of the truth, it causes so many problems that Little One, a brave young girl, decides to search for the missing half. With the help of Old Turtle, and many animal friends, Little One is able to mend the broken truth and make it whole again creating a better world for everyone. Suitable for children ages 5 and up. Written by Catherine Bush, music by Dax Dupuy; directed and choreographed by Sarah Sutliff; based on the children’s book by Douglas Wood. Running time: 60 minutes. No intermission. All tickets are general admission, $30 adults, $20 children. For tickets, call (646) 395-4310 or visit 14streety.org.

BOOK READINGS & ACTIVITIES—Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th Street, presents story time on most Saturdays at 11 a.m. with coloring and activities afterwards. For more information call (212) 253-0810 or visit bn.com.

May 18, Oh the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss.

May 25, Aladdin books (to coincide with release of film), Aladdin: A Friend Like Him (2019) by Suzanne Francis and Aladdin by Karin Kreider (Little Golden Books series, 2015). 

UKRAINIAN FESTIVAL—Saint George Ukrainian Catholic Church, 30 E. 7th St. between Second and Third Aves., presents the 43rd annual Ukrainian Festival, running May 17-19. The pageantry and beauty of Ukraine’s culture will be celebrated through dance, music, crafts and more with over 100 performers. The main stage shows are on Fri. at 6:30 p.m., Sat. at 2 and 6 p.m., and Sun at 1 and 3:30 p.m. Free admission. Free admission. For more information, call (212) 677-7160.

PERLER BEADS CRAFT—New York Public Library’s Tompkins Square Library, 331 E. 10th St., presents Perler Beads activities on Fri., May 17, 24 and 31 from 3-4:30 p.m. each day. Appropriate for children ages 5-12. For more information, call (212) 228-4747.

THEATER—Theater at the 14th Street Y, 344 E. 14th St between First and Second Aves., and The Rebel Playhouse present “Old Turtle and the Broken Truth,” running through May 19. In “Old Turtle and the Broken Truth,” a truth falls like a star from the sky and breaks into two pieces. When the villagers discover only half of the truth, it causes so many problems that Little One, a brave young girl, decides to search for the missing half. With the help of Old Turtle, and many animal friends, Little One is able to mend the broken truth and make it whole again creating a better world for everyone. Suitable for children ages 5 and up. Written by Catherine Bush, music by Dax Dupuy; directed and choreographed by Sarah Sutliff; based on the children’s book by Douglas Wood. Running time: 60 minutes. No intermission. All tickets are general admission, $30 adults, $20 children. For tickets, call (646) 395-4310 or visit 14streety.org.

TODDLER PLAYTIME—New York Public Library’s Tompkins Square Library, 331 E. 10th St., presents “Toddler Time” on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. Bring your toddlers to share fun and interesting stories, songs, rhymes and fingerplays. Recommended for children 18 months to three years of age. For more information, call (212) 228-4747.

ART WORKSHOP—The Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W. 17th St., presents “Family Sundays,” free activities from 1-4 p.m. Drop into the Education Center for some art-making, and there will be a 2 p.m. family exhibition tour, and go on your own thematic gallery search. Ages 3 and older with accompanying adults. For more information, visit rubinmuseum.org or call (212) 620-5000.  

CUB/BOY SCOUTS PACK 422—Scout Pack 422 is part of the Greater NY Councils and the Big Apple District and is sponsored by The Epiphany R.C. Church at 373 Second Ave. off of 21st St. Meetings are held in the Parish Hall. Cub Scouts meet on Wednesdays at 7 p.m., Boy Scouts meet on Thursdays at 6:45 p.m. Parents and new scouts are invited to meetings. For more information, call Maureen Riley at (917) 837-3311.

CUB/BOY SCOUTS PACK 414—Scout Troop 414 is part of the Greater New York Councils and the Big Apple District and is sponsored by the Immaculate Conception Church, 414 E. 14th St. Meetings are held in the school auditorium every Tuesday evening from 6:30-8 p.m. Parents and new Scouts are invited to meetings. For more information, visit troop414nyc.org.

TEENS/TWEENS

3D DOODLER—New York Public Library’s Tompkins Square Library, 331 E. 10th St., presents “3D Doodler!” on Mon., May 20 at 4 p.m. 3Doodler is a 3D doodling pen that allows you to create objects from drawing in the air or on surfaces. Participants will create physical structures from 3Doodler pens. Ages 8-12 and teens only.

GAMING—New York Public Library’s Tompkins Square Library, 331 E. 10th St., presents “Game On for Tweens/Teens!” on Wednesdays at 3:30-4:30 p.m. Gamers ages 8-18 play PS4, Wii, and Retro games in the basement. No registration needed. Ages: 8 and up. For more information, call (212) 228-4747.

ANIME/MANGA CLUB—New York Public Library’s Tompkins Square Library, 331 E. 10th St., presents an Anime and Manga Club on Tuesdays at 4 p.m. Read Manga. Watch Anime. Earn and win prizes. No registration necessary. For more information, call (212) 228-4747.

AUTHOR EVENTS  

Barnes & Noble presents director John Waters on Tues., May 21 at 7 p.m. in promotion of his new book, “Mr. Know-It-All: The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder.”

JOHN WATERS—Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th St., presents director John Waters on Tues., May 21 at 7 p.m. in promotion of his new book, Mr. Know-It-All: The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder. The man in the pencil-thin mustache, auteur of the transgressive movie classics Pink FlamingosPolyester, the original HairsprayCry-Baby, and A Dirty Shame, is one of the world’s great sophisticates, and in Mr. Know-It-All he discusses how to fail upward in Hollywood; how to build a home so ugly and trendy that no one but you would dare live in it; more important, how to tell someone you love them without emotional risk; and how to cheat death itself. Through it all, Waters swears by one undeniable truth: “Whatever you might have heard, there is absolutely no downside to being famous. None at all.” Priority access with purchase of the featured title from this B&N location. Additional details coming soon. For information, visit bn.com or call (212) 253-0810. 

DISCUSSIONS

FINANCIAL GUIDANCE SERIES—The New York Public Library’s Science, Industry & Business Library, 188 Madison Ave. at 34th St., presents the following series of financial help discussions. Seating is limited and on a first come, first-seated basis at the lower level conference Room 018. For information on the following programs, call (917) ASK-NYPL (917-275-6975) Monday to Saturday from 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

Wed., May 15 at 3:15 p.m. “Protecting Your Privacy and Security.” This class covers the best practices for keeping your information safe online and your computer virus free. (Two hours.) Presented by SIBL staff.

Mon., May 20 at 3:15 p.m., “Life Skills, Budgeting, Credit and Debt.” Get an introduction to savings and budget concepts. Learn about banks and banking products, including debit and credit cards and how to reduce debt. Presented by SIBL staff.

Wed., May 22 at 1:15 p.m., “Investing! What Your Money Can Do For You.” Learn how to focus on your investment goals, how to recognize the potential risks and rewards of different investments and how to match individual goals to investment choices. Presented by SIBL staff.

Tues., May 28 at 1:15 p.m., “Planning a Successful Retirement.” Where will the money come from? Learn about the variety of tax advantaged accounts that you can setup to help you acquire the nest egg necessary for retirement. Presented by SIBL staff.

Tues., May 28 at 3 p.m., “5 Steps to Improve Your FICO Score.” Elizabeth Patrick, CPA, CFP, teaches you how to improve your FICO score, credit profile and save money by qualifying for attractive financing options for credit cards, auto loans and home mortgages. Presented by the Financial Planning Association of New York. 

EXHIBITS

ABSTRACT WORKS, MONOPRINTS—Carter Burden Gallery, 548 W. 28th St., presents three new exhibitions running through May 22. “Uncontrollable” in the East Gallery features eleven gallery artists; “To the Muse” featuring Myrna Burks; and “On the Wall” featuring Sue Dean. “Uncontrollable” highlights the work of eleven abstract artists who were invited to present sculptures and paintings, all with an extraordinary use of intense color and technique. Artists include Stephen Cimini, Fukuko Harris, Helen Iranyi, Suejin Jo, Susan Lisbin, Margo Mead, Kiyoshi Otsuka, Simon Rigg, Mitchell Rosenzweig, Jennifer Woolcock Schwartz, and Hanna Seiman.

Burks presents monoprints that are featured in the exhibition were created in the Spring of 2016 and inspired by the Japanese Yatsuro papers in which they are printed on.

Dean has gathered scraps, rust, and discarded odds and ends in her travels; she then stitched and drew, painted and glued to create this installation inspired by disadvantaged children she’s encountered around the world.

The gallery hours are Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sat. from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Carter Burden targets artists over the age of 60. For more information, visit carterburdengallery.org.

PAINTINGS OF PETS—Lyons Wier Gallery, 542 W. 24th St., presents “Emotional Support,” a series of paintings by James Rieck, running through June 1. “Emotional Support,” addresses and celebrates the relationship between people and pets. Using Rieck’s emblematic 1960s fashion vocabulary from department store advertising, “Emotional Support: examines the complex and compelling bond between people and their pets using oversaturated hues, odd cropping, and boldly patterned backgrounds creating a familiar but altered composition. Rieck masterfully masks the figure’s identity by cropping out the viewer’s gaze and directing us to the eyes of the dog or cat for clarification. Gallery hours: Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. For more information, call (212) 242-6220 or visit lyonswiergallery.com. 

STREET ART—The Grand Gallery at the National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents “Studio in the Street: Symbols – Totems – Cyphers,” running through June 14. In the early 1980s, New York City vibrated with an alternative art scene that played itself out on the streets and vacant lots throughout the city. A wave of talent took to creating an exhilarating intersection of art and life. As the scene moved from the periphery of the art world to its center, these artists retained the energy of the street while creating a new and dynamic vision. This important overview of Street Art will feature works by Keith Haring and Richard Hambleton as well Scot Borofsky, Ken Hiratsuka, Angel Ortiz, Robin Van Arsdol, Bob Dombrowski, Kevin Wendall (FA-Q), and Paolo Buggiani. Gallery hours are Mon.-Fri from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information, visit nationalartsclub.com or call (212) 475-3424. 

FOR SENIORS 

PLAY READING  GROUP—The Stein Senior Center, 204 E. 23rd St., has launched a play reading group, led by Nancy Finn and Carmine Bracale. All are invited to group meetings on the first and third Fridays of each month from 10 a.m.-noon. Participants will be looking at plays from Shakespeare to modern. Scripts with large print will be supplied. No experience with the plays necessary. A contribution is requested.

ART HISTORY CLASS–The Stein Center, 204 E. 23rd St., offers an art history class every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 12 noon. Participants enjoy examples of visual arts, including painting, sculpture and architecture from around the world. Awesomely beautiful and culturally important art works are projected on a large screen accompanied by bold face printed text and spoken comments by leader Judy Collischan, Ph.D. Discussion, participation and interaction are encouraged. No experience with art or its history is necessary. A modest contribution is requested, and all are welcome to attend.

RUBIN MUSEUM PROGRAMS—Rubin Museum of Art, 150 W. 17th St., presents “Senior Mondays.  On the first Monday of the month from 11 a.m.-5 p.m., seniors (65 and older) receive free admission to the galleries. The day includes a range of free programs including a docent talk. For more information, visit rubinmuseum.org.

OTHER EVENTS 

BIRD WALKS—On Thurs., May 16, the Madison Square Park Conservancy presents a guided bird watching walk from noon-1 p.m. in the park. Local birder Ethan Goodman will lead the walks in search of everyday city and special migratory birds, like the warblers and woodpeckers. The group will meet at the Southern Fountain. Binoculars provided.

MEMORIAL FLAG GARDEN—Madison Square Park Conservancy and Credit Suisse present “Fallen Soldier’s Flag Garden,” a Memorial Day installation to honor the more than 100,000 fallen soldiers from the State of New York since the Revolutionary War. With the help of veterans and volunteers, 10,000 American flags will be planted on two of Madison Square Park’s lawns and on view from Thurs., May 23-Tues., May 28. Each flag represents 10 fallen soldiers and their sacrifice. Madison Square Park is the proud home of the Eternal Light Flagstaff, which was dedicated on Armistice Day in 1924 to commemorate the return of the victorious United States forces from the First World War.

COLORING—The New York Public Library’s Epiphany Library, 228 E. 23rd St., presents a coloring club for adults on Tues., May 28 at 11 a.m. Participants get creative and enjoy music in a no-pressure atmosphere. All supplies provided but feel free to bring your own. For more information, call (212) 679-2645. 

DRAG MARCH EVENT—Tompkins Square Library, 331 E. 10th St. between Aves. A and B, presents on  Sat., June 8 at 3 p.m.: “Reviving Assotto Saint’s New Love Song (1989)” A celebration of the life and work of Assotto Saint (1957-1994): poet, playwright, performer, editor, publisher, performer, caretaker, and trouble-maker. In 1989 Assato Saint’s multimedia theater piece New Love Song put black gay men on center stage in New York City, providing a space for storytelling, ritual, and healing. Original cast members, collaborators, and friends will reflect on the 30th anniversary of this undersung production and its “Forever Gay” creator. 

ONGOING EVENTS

CROCHET AND KNITTING GROUP—The New York Public Library’s Epiphany Library, 228 E. 23rd St., has a crochet and knitting group that meets bi-monthly on Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to noon. This is a volunteer-led group. All are invited to participate and socialize with others and even pick up some extra tips and tricks as you work your own creations. Please bring your own supplies. Pattern books will be provided to peruse and borrow. For more information, call (212) 679-2645. 

FILM SCREENINGS—The Epiphany Library, 228 E. 23rd St., screens films every Thursday at 2 p.m. To contact the branch for more information, call (212) 679-2645. 

TOURS OF CENTER FOR JEWISH HISTORY—Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., offers free tours (exclusive of the YUM galleries) on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. Tours last approximately 1 1/2 hours and include the exhibitions of the American Jewish Historical Society, the American Sephardi Federation, the Leo Baeck Institute and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, as well as the Reading Room, Genealogy Institute and other public spaces. Tours for groups of 10 or more can be scheduled by calling (917) 606-8226.

UNION SQUARE WALKING TOURS—The Union Square Partnership presents free, weekly walking tours of Union Square. The 90-minute tour explores the social and political history of the neighborhood through discussions of the people, history, architecture and forces that have shaped this community. You’ll hear how Union Square got its name, see where the legendary Tiffany & Co. once stood and learn how to read the clock (yes, it’s a clock!) on “The Metronome” sculpture and so much more! The tour begins at the Abraham Lincoln statue by the 16th St. transverse in Union Square Park, Sat. at 2 p.m. Look for the guide holding a Union Square: Crossroads of New York sign. Reservations required for groups. For more information, call (212) 517-1826 or visit unionsquarenyc.org.

FLATIRON WALKING TOURS—The Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) provides free, year-round historic walking tours of the district, led by local historian professional guides. The tours take place every Sunday starting at 11 a.m., and meet at the tip of the Flatiron Building (new location). No advance registration is required. The walking tour highlights some of the city’s most notable landmarks, including: the New York Life Insurance Building, the MetLife Clock Tower, the Appellate Courthouse and the Flatiron Building. Historians leading tours are: Miriam Berman, author of Madison Square: The Park and Its Celebrated Landmarks; Mike Kaback and Fred Cookinham. For more information visit www.flatirondistrict.nyc.

POETRY WORKSHOP—The Epiphany Poets group meets at the Muhlenberg Public Library at 209 W. 23rd Street, between Seventh and Eighth Aves. every third Friday of the month from 2-4 p.m. It is a workshop so each person brings a poem — bring 12 or 13 copies to hand to each person and then discuss each work. The group is helpful and collegial. If there is time, a second poem by those who have brought one can be discussed.

Advertisements

18 thoughts on “Around and About

  1. Was there a bird walk today? When I arrived at 8.03 there was no one there (20St. at the entrance of Stuyvesant Cove), so I left. Is there a contact for the walk leader so that we may confirm each time?

  2. Pingback: Upcoming Events « Town & Village Blog

  3. Pingback: Free kayaking, Family Day at Stuyvesant Cove | Town & Village Blog

  4. Pingback: Local events this week: Mammograms, Bird walk, MulchFest | Town & Village Blog

  5. Pingback: Events in the community this week | Town & Village Blog

  6. Pingback: Outdoor concerts taking place this week | Town & Village Blog

  7. Pingback: Movies, folk dancing and more outdoor events this week | Town & Village Blog

  8. Pingback: 14th Street Y is home to ‘Fringe Jr.’ | Town & Village Blog

  9. Pingback: 14th Street Y is home to ‘Fringe Jr.’ | Tinseltown Times

  10. Pingback: Mad. Sq. 200, a fair to remember | Town & Village Blog

  11. Pingback: Meetings and drives in the community | Town & Village Blog

  12. Pingback: Union Square Park summer event series kicks off today | Town & Village Blog

  13. Hello !
    Hope you are having a great day. My name is Debbie from Creative Dream Entertainment. I am a big participant of the Summer in the Square Event . This week at Summer in the Square, our special guest will be BATMAN!!! Can you please be so kind as to add onto the list Creative Dream Entertainment as one of the Summer in the Square vendors?
    Creative Dream Entertainment at Summer in the Square , Thursday, July 30th from 1pm-4pm near the Big Yellow Tent ! Arts & Crafts included!!! Can you please also add we will be at the event for the next two Thursday’s with a special Princess Guest for each week.
    Will keep you updated for the last 2 weeks of the event who will be appearing.

    Thank you, please confirm received,

    Have a wonderful evening,
    Best
    Debbie
    CEO
    Creative Dream Entertainment

  14. Pingback: ST actor to star in autobiographical play about LGBT college rugby team | Town & Village Blog

  15. Pingback: GNA holds annual community exhibit at Arts Club | Town & Village Blog

  16. Pingback: Indoor places to take your kids when it’s just too hot outside | Town & Village

  17. Pingback: Halloween events that are local, kid-friendly | Town & Village

  18. Pingback: Unleash your inner artist at Manhattan parks this summer | Town & Village

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.