Around and About

CONCERTS
JAZZ—Jazz Standard, 116 E. 27th St., presents concerts nearly every evening, with sets at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. each night:
Oct. 12-14, John Beasley’s Monk’estra, $30,
Oct. 15, Brilliant Corners: David Virelles, Andrew Cyrille, Ben Street, $25.
Oct. 16, Mingus Big Band, $25.
Oct. 17, Brilliant Corners: Frank Kimbrough Quartet plays Monk, $25.
Oct. 18, Brian Lynch Quartet, $25.
Oct. 19-22, Charles Tolliver Tentet plays Monk at Town Hall 1959, $30 Thurs. and Sun., $35 Fri. and Sat.
Oct. 23, Oct. 16, Mingus Big Band, $25.
Oct. 24-25, Azar Lawrence Quintet featuring Steven Turre, $30.
Oct. 26-28, Yosvany Terry/Baptiste Trotognon “Ancestral Memories,” $30.
For more information, visit http://www.jazzstandard.com.

ROCK & MORE—Irving Plaza, 17 Irving Pl., presents the following concerts:
For tickets, visit irvingplaza.com or call (212) 777-6800.
Oct. 12 at 7 p.m., Blond Pilot, $25 and fees.
Oct. 13 at 7 p.m., Everything Everything, $20-$35.
Oct. 14 at 7 p.m., the Lany Tour (sold out).
Oct. 15 at 7 p.m., the Lany Tour, $50-$113.
Oct. 16 at 7 p.m., The Underachievers, $23-$103.
Oct. 17 at 7 p.m., Chelsea Wolfe, $25.
Oct. 18 at 7 p.m., Judah and the Lion, $22.
Oct. 19 at 6 p.m., Andy Mineo, $25-$55.
Oct. 20 at 11 p.m., Party Favor powered by Brunch Bounce, $20-$35.
Oct. 21 at 8 p.m., Pink Talking Fish Starts Making Sense, $27-$40.
Oct. 23 at 7 p.m., Our Lady Peace, $34-$100.
Oct. 24 at 7 p.m., Aminé (sold out).
Oct. 26 at 7 p.m., Citizen. $20.
Oct. 27 at 8 p.m., Dopapod, The Motet, $27-$68.

JAZZ—The Olmsted Salon presents “Jazz in the Cave” featuring the Uptown Jazz Tentet on Fri., Oct. 13 with sets at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Founded and led collaboratively by trumpeter Brandon Lee and trombonists Willie Applewhite and James Burton III, the ensemble is comprised of ten of the most venerable and ubiquitous young sidemen in all of jazz. The performance takes place in The Cave at St. George’s, 209 E. 16th St (east of Third Ave.) courtyard entrance. $15 cover at the door. For more info visit olmstedsalon.com or call (646)-723-4178.   

ROCK & MORE—The Gramercy Theatre, 127 E. 23rd St., presents the following concerts:
For tickets, visit thegramercytheatre.com or call (212) 614-6932.
Oct. 13 at 7 p.m., Atlas Genius, $21.
Oct. 14 at 7 p.m., The Main Squeeze and Sophistafunk, $15-$40.
Oct. 15 at 1 p.m., Jess and Gabriel Conte (sold out).
Oct. 18 at 7 p.m., Toadies, $25.
Oct. 19 at 7 p.m., Nekromantix, $18-$37.
Oct. 20 at 5:30 p.m., Brooklyn & Bailey, $35.50.
Oct. 21 at 7 p.m., High Valley, Ashley McBryde, Adam Doleac, $19.
Oct. 22 at 6 p.m., Soulfly does Nailbomb, $35-$36.
Oct. 24 at 7 p.m., T-Pain (sold out).
Oct. 25 at 7 p.m., Turnpike Trabadours, $25.
Oct. 26 at 7 p.m., Lords of Acid, $34-$35. 

THIRD STREET MUSIC SCHOOL SERIES—LiveSOUNDS presents free performances by faculty and their guests most Fridays at Third Street Music School from October to March. Concerts take place Friday evenings at 7 p.m. at the Anna Maria Kellen Auditorium at 235 E. 11th St. between 2nd and 3rd Aves. Third Street and its auditorium are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit thirdstreetmusicschool.org.

Oct. 13, Caitlin Lynch, viola.
Oct. 20, Nathaniel LaNasa, piano.
Oct. 27, Dale Smith, tenor.

FOLK/POLITICAL/SOCIAL CONCERT SERIES—The Peoples’ Voice Café, an alternative coffeehouse, organizes weekly concerts and events celebrating humanitarian issues and concerns. The cafe is run as a not-for-profit collective and concerts are held Saturdays from 8-10:30 p.m. at The Community Church of New York Unitarian Universalist, 40 E. 35th St. (between Madison and Park Aves. Wheelchair-accessible). Suggested donation: $18; $10 for PVC members; more if you choose; less if you can’t; no one turned away. For more information, call (212) 787-3903 or visit http://www.peoplesvoicecafe.org.

Oct. 14, social justice rapper Professor Louie & The Lewis Family.
Oct. 21, Americana/folk duo Eli & Bill Perras and labor/social justice singer George Mann.
Oct. 28, folk duo The Rix: Rik Palieri and Rick Nestler and singer/songwriter Chris Nauman.

THEATER
LGBT—Theater for the New City (TNC), 155 First Ave. at E. 10th St., will present “Up the Rabbit Hole,” a new play directed by G.R. Johnson, through Oct. 15. This play is a very personal one for playwright Andy Halliday. As an adopted child, his feelings about being different were very powerful and consumed my thoughts as teenager. These feelings were comforted by a very bad cocaine habit.  He went into rehab. He got out. He wrote this play for the queer community to show that there’s hope for people who deal with addiction problems and low self-esteem. To purchase tickets, $25, call (212) 868-4444 or visit theaterforthenewcity.net.

POLITICAL COMEDY—The Workshop Theater, 312 W. 36th St., 4 fl. East, presented by The Workshop Theater presents “Mesquite, NV,” running through Oct. 28. Based on actual events, this play by Leegrid Stevens is a dark comedy about power and politics. It’s set in the retirement community of Mesquite, Nevada and dramatizes a contentious municipal election. The campaign turns nasty as complaints of sweetheart deals and fraudulent travel vouchers are leaked to the local press. Accusations quickly divide the town, leading to complete political upheaval, the downfall of both candidates and the hasty installation of outsiders to replace them. The play reflects truths of the American political pathology with humor. Thomas Coté is artistic director; Dana Leslie Goldstein is managing director. Performances are Thurs. and Fri. at 7 p.m., Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 3 p.m. $25 general admission, $18 students and seniors. Box office at http://www.workshoptheater.org or (866) 811-4111 (Ovation tickets).

POLITICAL—FRIGID New York @ Horse Trade in association with Project Y Theatre Company presents an extension of “Trump Lear,” which had a run that ended on Aug. 12 at Under St. Marks (94 St. Marks Pl. between 1st Ave. and Ave. A). It is now running again through Oct. 28. Actor and impersonator Carl David is being held without bail for performing his Trump-inspired version of Shakespeare’s King Lear. Carl David is forced to perform his King Lear to an unseen online audience of one, as the president restlessly watches remotely from a live and public feed. The stakes are high: if Trump likes Carl and his show, Carl lives. If not, Carl dies. But how can Carl get through a show where he has created a Lear based on Trump himself without offending the audience? Written and performed by David Carl and directed by Michole Biancosino. Tickets ($20) may be purchased in advance at horsetrade.info. Visit http://www.trumplear.com for more information.

MACABRE—After 20 years of bringing macabre tales of madness and murder to the East Village, writer Clay McLeod Chapman is driving a stake into the heart of his long-running storytelling staple “The Pumpkin Pie Show” He and Hanna Cheek along with special guests present one final foray into the abyss with their favorite literary perversions from the last two decades. “Death to the Pumpkin Pie Show” will run at Under St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl. between 1st Ave. and Ave. A through Oct. 28 with performances Thurs.-Sat. at 8 p.m. Tickets ($20) may be purchased in advance at http://www.horsetrade.info. See all three shows for the price of two when you use the code PIE.

The shows are “Commencement,” written by Chapman running Thurs., October 12, 19 and 26 at 8 p.m. Hanna Cheek plays three women drawn together in the grim aftermath of a high school shooting.

“Seasick,” written by Clay McLeod Chapman with songs by Kyle Jarrow, running Fri., Oct. 13, 20 and 27 at 8 p.m. As an outbreak of norovirus spreads through a luxury cruise-liner, one family must fight for survival onboard this sun-and-blood soaked voyage into insanity. Warning: Not for the weak-stomached.

“Best of Blitzkrieg,” written by Chapman, running Sat., Oct. 14, 21 and 28 at 8 p.m. Cheek and Chapman present a hand-selected roster of their favorite “Pumpkin Pie” stories. Every story will be chosen at random each night onstage.

Irish Repertory Theatre presents a comedic glimpse into 35 years behind the wheel of a yellow taxi, “Off The Meter,” running through Nov. 5.

COMEDY—Irish Repertory Theatre, 132 W. 22nd St., presents a comedic glimpse into 35 years behind the wheel of a New York City yellow taxi, “Off The Meter,” running through Nov. 5. This is a pithy social commentary from New York’s most recognizable cab driver about life spent behind the wheel. John McDonaugh, veteran radio host, has condensed thirty-plus years of activism, reality show antics and observation into a love song to the city that never sleeps. This includes the plight of the NYC homeless to the crazy demands of Upper East Side matrons, to brushes with the rich and famous. McDonaugh is currently producer and host of “Radio Free Eireann” and “Talk Mac, We and Thee” with Malachy McCourt and Corey Kilgannon, weekly radio shows heard on Pacifica station WBAI, New York. He began his career as a NYC Yellow cab driver after serving in the U.S. Army in Germany during the Vietnam War. Performances are Wed. and Sat. at 3 and 8 p.m., Thurs. at 7 p.m., Fri. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 3 p.m. Tickets are $50 and available at irishrep.org or by calling (212) 727-2737.

COMEDY—Thirteenth Street Repertory Company, 50 W. 13th St. between Fifth and Sixth Aves., presents the return of “The Accidental Pervert,” a comedy that tells the awkwardly poignant story of a boy’s journey into manhood after discovering his dad’s X-rated video tapes hidden in a bedroom closet. He subsequently develops an addiction to pornography that continues until the age of 26, when he meets his wife to be, and finds himself struggling to find the balance between fantasy and reality. Performances are Fri. and Sat. at 7 p.m. Tickets are $49 and available by calling (212) 352-3101 or visit http://www.theaccidentalpervert.com.

OTHER PERFORMANCES
COMEDY—Comedian Margaret Cho will perform at The Gramercy Theatre, 127 E. 23rd St., on Oct. 12 at 10 p.m., as part of her “Fresh Off the Bloat” tour. In this stand up show Cho talks about being fresh off drugs, drinking and on the brink of suicide. For tickets, $49-$50, visit thegramercytheatre.com.

BURLESQUE & VARIETY—The Horse Trade Theater Group presents “Ten-Foot Rat Cabaret” on Sat., Oct. 14 at 10:30 p.m. at Under St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl. The show features comedy, music, burlesque, vaudeville and more hosted by Canadian import Jillian Thomas. Created and produced by Rob Dub and Gregory Levine. The Fishnet Follies perform at each show. Note: The Rat has move to every second Saturday instead of just once a month. Visit www.tenfootrat.com for the latest show information. 21 and up to drink, 17 and up or accompanies by guardian to enter. Admission is $15, $10 in advance by calling (212) 868-4444 or visiting http://www.horsetrade.info. 

COMEDY—The Stand Comedy Cub, 239 Third Ave., presents Janeane Garofalo along with other comics on the following dates:

Mon., Oct. 16 at 7:30 p.m., Garofalo will perform as will Jessica Kirson, $20.
Tues., Oct. 17 at 8 p.m., Garofalo with Dan Soder, Mark Normand, Joe List, Yannis Pappas, Tim Dillon and more, $15.
Wed., Oct. 25, at 8 p.m., Garofalo with Dan Soder, Mark Normand, Ron Bennington, Yannis Pappas, Sean Patton and more, $15.

For tickets, visit, thestandnyc.com.

VARIETY—The Horse Trade Theater Group presents “The Varietal Hour” on Fri., Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. at Under St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl. The Varietal Hour showcases a diverse collection of talent from around the city. Host and two-time Tony Award rehearsal attendee Lucas Womack splits a bottle of wine with guests as they perform anything from stand up to soft shoe, from storytelling to juggling, and very little in between. Also, to celebrate the season, a costume contest is in order. Best audience costume receives a bottle of our selected wine of the month. Cover is $10. For more information, visit www.horsetrade.info. 

IMPROV COMEDY—The Horse Trade Theater Group presents its next monthly “Thank You, Robot” on Fri., Oct. 20 at 10:30 p.m. at Under St. Marks, 94 St. Marks Pl. This is a showcase for independent and established improv teams. For each show, two teams join “Thank You, Robot” to perform sets of unscripted comedy, never seen before and never to be seen again. Cover is $5. For more information, visit http://www.horsetrade.info. 

STORY TELLING—FRIGID New York @ Horse Trade will present a limited encore run of “Dandy Darkly’s Myth Mouth!” written and performed by Dandy Darkly and directed by Ian Bjorklund, at Under St. Marks (94 St. Marks Place between 1st Ave. and Ave. A) with performances on Fri., Oct. 27 at 10:30 p.m., Sun., Oct. 29 at 7 p.m., and Mon., Oct. 30 at 7 p.m. Dandy regales his hilarious tales of sex and death alongside a nonstop soundscape of prerecorded music composed by long time musical collaborators Adam Tendler (piano), Bryce Edwards (guitar, bass) and Rachel Blumberg (percussion), The show is peppered with eerie and eclectic sound effects to create an utterly immersive storytelling experience that must be seen to be believed. Tickets ($20) may be purchased in advance at http://www.frigidnewyork.info.  

OPEN MIC—The Nuyorican Poets Cafe 236 E. Third St., between Aves. B and C, presents “Open Mic Mondays” every Monday at 8 p.m. except holidays. Hosted by Olivia Custodio, this weekly event is a boisterous free-for-all of poetry, hip hop, monologues, acoustic singer-songwriter performances and anything else that a person can do in five minutes on a stage; packed with young artists and their fans, this show is guaranteed to be more fun than whatever you normally do on a Monday night; no cover, one-drink minimum. For more information, call (212) 505-8183 or visit http://www.nuyorican.org. The cafe is wheelchair accessible, but calling ahead of time is recommended so staff can accommodate wheelchair users.

POETRY SLAM—The Nuyorican Poets Cafe, 236 E. Third St., between Aves. B and C, presents its Wednesday Night Slam Open. Jive Poetic hosts this energetic event, the cafe’s proving ground for emerging poets and experienced artists who want to try out new work. Anyone can sign up for a performance slot, but only one winner per week will advance to the Friday Night Poetry Slam; $7 event takes place every Wednesday at 9 p.m., except for the first Wednesday of the month. To order tickets, visit http://www.nuyorican.org. For more information, call (212) 505-8183. The cafe is wheelchair accessible, but calling ahead of time is recommended so staff can accommodate wheelchair users.

OPEN MIC—“The Open Mic Downstairs” runs every Tuesday at 9 p.m. at Under St. Marks (94 St. Marks Pl. between First Ave. and Ave. A). Dan Ricker, Kaitlyn O’Connor and Mike Milazzo have taken the reins with spoken word artists, musicians, comedians and other creative folks invited to put their two cents in. Cover is $3. For more information or to purchase tickets in advance visit http://www.horsetrade.info.

POETRY SLAM & OPEN MIC—The Nuyorican Poets Cafe 236 E. Third St., between Aves. B and C, presents its Friday Night Poetry Slam each week at 10 p.m. Host Mahogany Browne curates the most popular and longest-running slam poetry series in New York City. Nationally renowned poets and rising stars compete for a slot on the cafe’s Slam Team. $10 regular admission, $20 for a limited number of reserved seats. A free open mic follows each Friday Night Poetry Slam. To order tickets, visit http://www.nuyorican.org. For more information, call (212) 505-8183. The cafe is wheelchair accessible, but calling ahead of time is recommended so staff can accommodate wheelchair users. 

Horse Trade presents “Chalk” on Sat., Oct. 14 at 2:30 p.m. at The Kraine Theater, a playful one-man show that invites audiences into a hand-drawn world.

FAMILY/CHILDREN
BOOK READINGS & ACTIVITIES—Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th Street, presents story time on most Saturdays at 11 a.m. with coloring and activities afterwards. For more information call (212) 253-0810 or visit bn.com.
Oct. 14 After the Fall (How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again) by Dan Santat
Oct. 21, Good Day, Good Night by Margaret Wise Brown and The Moonlight Meeting (The Nocturnals series) by Waymond Singleton.
Oct. 28, Mary McScary by R.L. Stine and a Creepy Pair of Underwear by Aaron Reynolds.

SOLO SHOW—Horse Trade presents “Chalk” on Sat., Oct. 14 at 2:30 p.m. at The Kraine Theater (85 E. 4th St. between 2nd Ave. and Bowery). “Chalk” is a playful one-man show that invites audiences into a hand-drawn world where imagination is made real and anything can happen. Charlie Chaplin meets Harold and the Purple Crayon. $15; $5 for kids under 12. Tickets may be purchased in advance at http://www.horsetrade.info.

BOOK READINGS—The Strand Bookstore, 828 Broadway at 12th St., presents story time, including crafts, on most Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to noon and 2-3 p.m. All children must be accompanied by a parent for the duration of their visit. For more information, visit strandbooks.com or call (212) 473-1452.

CUB/BOY SCOUTS PACK 422—Scout Pack 422 is part of the Greater NY Councils and the Big Apple District and is sponsored by The Epiphany R.C. Church at 373 Second Ave. off of 21st St. Meetings are held in the Parish Hall. Cub Scouts meet on Wednesdays at 7 p.m., Boy Scouts meet on Thursdays at 6:45 p.m. Parents and new scouts are invited to meetings. For more information, call Maureen Riley at (917) 837-3311.

CUB/BOY SCOUTS PACK 414—Scout Troop 414 is part of the Greater New York Councils and the Big Apple District and is sponsored by the Immaculate Conception Church, 414 E. 14th St. Meetings are held in the school auditorium every Tuesday evening from 6:30-8 p.m. Parents and new Scouts are invited to meetings. For more information, visit http://www.troop414nyc.org.

AUTHOR EVENTS
JIMMY FALLON—Jimmy Fallon, “Tonight Show” show host and Gramercy Park resident, will be at Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th St. in promotion of his new book Everything is Mama on Sat., Oct. 14 at noon. Fallon was on a mission with his first children’s book to have every baby’s first word be “dada.” And it worked. A lot of babies’ first words were “dada.” However, everything after that was “mama.” So take a lighthearted look at the world from your baby’s point of view as different animals try to teach their children that there are other words in addition to “mama” for familiar objects and activities. For more information, visit bn.com.

GABRIELLE UNION—Actress Gabrielle Union will discuss her new book We’re Going to Need More Wine at an event hosted by Strand Books at The Gramercy Theatre, 127 E. 23rd St., on Tues. Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. For years Hollywood had been yearning for an insightful and strong female actor to stand up for the throngs of women harassed and abused in the world of showbiz; Gabrielle Union answered the call and has since become the voice of the victims of sexual violence. Her new book is a collection of essays on gender, sexuality, race, beauty, film, and what it means to be a modern woman. She also covers everything from the unfair beauty standards foisted upon women to how she coped with her parent’s divorce. Union will be interviewed by WNYC’s Phoebe Robinson and Jessica Williams. Event admission is $37. For tickets, visit thegramercytheatre.com. For more information, visit strandbooks.com. 

FICTION AUTHOR TALK—“Weird fiction” writer China Miéville, author of The City & the City, will discuss his style of prose, real-world monsters, and more with science-fiction writer Samuel Delany, author of “The Einstein Intersection” and other works, on Thurs., Oct. 19, 4:30-6 p.m. at New York University’s Jurow Lecture Hall, Silver Center for Arts and Sciences, 100 Washington Square East at Washington Place. Heather Masri and Robin Nagle, clinical professors in Liberal Studies, will moderate the event. Miéville, three-time recipient of the Arthur C. Clarke Award for Science Fiction Literature, has also penned This Census-Taker and October: The Story of the Russian Revolution. Space is limited; seats are available on a first-come, first-seated basis. For more information, contact NYU Liberal Studies at (212) 998-7120.

ANNIE LEIBOVITZ—Annie Leibovitz will be at Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th St. on Thurs., Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. in promotion of her new book, Portraits 2005-2016. A limited number of wristbands for event access will be distributed with purchase of the featured title beginning at 9 a.m. the day of the event. Following a discussion of her new book, Leibovitz will personalize and pose for photos while signing. In the interest of time she will not be signing any additional backlist or memorabilia. For more information, visit bn.com.

DISCUSSIONS
FINANCIAL GUIDANCE SERIES—The following free informational events, presented by the Financial Planning Association of NY, will take place at the Science, Industry & Business Library, 188 Madison Ave. at 34th St. For more information visit nypl.org/sibl.

“Do I Need an Estate Plan” on Sat., Oct. 14 at noon. Eric Dostal, J.D., CFP, shares his legal and financial planning expertise to help demystify the estate planning process. Even if you think your estate will be relatively small, taking a few simple steps now could make a big difference for your family and loved ones. Presented by the Financial Planning Association of NY.

“Understanding Your Financial Statements” on Tues., Oct. 17 at 6 p.m. One very important tool to understanding your brokerage account performance is to carefully review your account statements on a regular basis. Monica Cirillo provides some helpful hints to understand the different components of an account statement. Presented by the SIFMA Foundation.

School of Visual Arts MPS Art Therapy Project Space and New York City Health + Hospitals present “Safe Spaces,” running through Oct. 26. This is an exhibition of artwork and music created by people incarcerated on Rikers Island. (Pictured) Art by Dioris Espinal

EXHIBITS
ILLUSTRATION & MORE/SVA—School of Visual Arts presents the following exhibitions:

SVA Flatiron Project Space, 133/141 W. 21st St., presents “Mind Sets,” through Oct. 14. BFA Fine Arts presents an exhibition of student work that explores the ways artists can employ their craft to express their concerns during uncertain times. Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

SVA Gramercy Gallery, 209 E. 23rd St., presents “Detours,” an exhibition of work by MPS Digital Photography students, running from Oct. 14-Nov. 11. Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Reception: Wed., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m.

SVA Flatiron Gallery, 133/141 W. 21st St., presents “MFA Computer Arts Exhibition,” an exhibition of work by the program’s students, running Oct. 21-Nov. 22. Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Reception: Thurs., Oct. 26, 6-8 p.m.

MPS Art Therapy Project Space, 132 W. 21st St., 5th floor, presents “Safe Spaces,” running through Oct. 26. MPS Art Therapy and New York City Health + Hospitals present an exhibition of artwork and music created by people incarcerated on Rikers Island, curated by Lesley Achitoff and Robert Belgrod. Hours: Mon., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Tues., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wed., noon-8 p.m.; Thurs. from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 6-7 p.m.; additional hours by appointment only.

SVA Chelsea Gallery, 601 W. 26th Street, 15th floor, presents “The Masters Series” by Christoph Niemann, running through Nov. 4. It will showcase the acclaimed illustrator, artist and author’s sensibility and tireless inventiveness, featuring the illustrations, magazine covers, animations and digital works that have built his reputation as one of the most renowned creative talents in the field today. Gallery hours: Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY—The National Arts Club’s Trask Gallery, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents “Through the Lens of Rose Hartman,” running through Oct. 28. For 40 years, photographer Rose Hartman has documented nightlife in some of the most legendary settings in New York. A chronicler of decades of fashion as well as popular culture, her arresting pictures have been published in Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Vanity Fair. She is the subject of the recent documentary film “The Incomparable Rose Hartman.” A collaboration between the Fashion and Fine Arts Committees, Through The Lens, will feature some of Hartman’s most iconic images including Mick Jagger, Bianca Jagger and Andy Warhol. For more information, visit nationalartsclub.com or call (212) 475-3424.

LANDSCAPE AND FLORAL PAINTINGS—The National Arts Club’s Grand Gallery, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents Morton Kaish’s “Spring Rising,” running through Oct. 28. Kaish is an American artist whose work can be found in major museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the British Museum. This show presents 30 years of Kaish’s floral and landscape works. Also featured are a series of accomplished etchings and monotypes.   Kaish is Professor Emeritus in the School of Art and Design at FIT/SUNY as well as well as serving on the faculties of The New School, The Parsons School of Design and The School of Visual Arts.

Lyons Wier Gallery presents “Rapture,” an exhibition of paintings by James Rieck, running through Nov. 4. Using models from 1950s and 60s commercial magazines, “Rapture” pictures individuals looking at artwork on public display.

PAINTINGS—Lyons Wier Gallery, 542 W. 24th St., presents “Rapture,” an exhibition of paintings by James Rieck, running through Nov. 4. Using models from 1950s and 60s commercial magazines, “Rapture” juxtaposes an idyllic midcentury moment of bliss spurred on by each individual pictured while looking at artwork on public display.  Rieck’s compositions combine highly sexualized historical masterpieces such as Matisse’s Le Bonheur de Vivre, Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s Bather Drying Herself, and Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe, with an overtly ecstatic viewer. Gallery Hours: Tues.-Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. For more information, call (212) 242-6220 or visit lyonswiergallery.com. 

NATURE INSPIRED FASHION—The Fashion & Textile History Gallery at Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Seventh Ave. at 27th St., presents “Force of Nature,” running through Nov. 18. This exhibition examines the complex relationship between fashion and the natural world. The exhibition reveals how nature has historically influenced fashion, and how fashion can serve as an indicator of society’s relationship with the natural world. In eighteenth century Europe, for example, nature became an object of renewed fascination as a result of overseas exploration. This fascination found expression in garments that featured depictions of exotic plants and animals. Spanning the eighteenth century to the present, the exhibition is organized into ten sections, each focusing on a facet of fashion’s connection to nature. Garments, textiles, and accessories, exclusively from the collection of The Museum at FIT, illustrate how principles in the natural sciences, such as the dynamics of sexual attraction, have informed fashion design. Elaborately feathered women’s hats, for example, show how the plumage male birds use for sexual display has been appropriated to emphasize female beauty. “Force of Nature” is organized by Melissa Marra-Alvarez, associate curator of Education and Public Programs at the museum. Hours: Tues.-Fri. from noon-8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun.-Mon. closed.

EXPEDITION-INSPIRED FASHION—The Special Exhibitions Gallery at Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Seventh Ave. at 27th St., presents “Expedition: Fashion from the Extreme” running through Jan. 6. “Expedition” examines high fashion inspired by clothing made for survival in the most inhospitable environments on earth and beyond. Experimental, high tech materials made for exploration to otherworldly realms — such as neoprene (deep sea) and Mylar (outer space) — have made their way onto the runway. Expeditions to these extreme environments were motivated primarily by interest in the natural world that flourished during the Victorian era. On view will be a historical fur garment created in Siberia, as well as adaptations of indigenous Arctic clothing. Also included will be the earliest down-filled jackets, dating to the 1930s, and other technologically experimental objects engineered for polar and mountain exploration. These garments will be placed alongside fantastic and outrageous fashions from the 1960s, as well as contemporary designs. A book of the same title, to be published by Thames and Hudson, will accompany the exhibition. Hours: Tues.-Fri. from noon-8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun.-Mon. closed. For more information, visit fitnyc.edu.

FOR SENIORS
PLAY READING  GROUP—The Stein Senior Center, 204 E. 23rd St., has launched a play reading group, led by Nancy Finn and Carmine Bracale. All are invited to group meetings on the first and third Fridays of each month from 10 a.m.-noon. Participants will be looking at plays from Shakespeare to modern. Scripts with large print will be supplied. No experience with the plays necessary. A contribution is requested.

ART HISTORY CLASS–The Stein Center, 204 E. 23rd St., offers an art history class every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 12 noon. Participants enjoy examples of visual arts, including painting, sculpture and architecture from around the world. Awesomely beautiful and culturally important art works are projected on a large screen accompanied by bold face printed text and spoken comments by leader Judy Collischan, Ph.D. Discussion, participation and interaction are encouraged. No experience with art or its history is necessary. A modest contribution is requested, and all are welcome to attend.

OTHER EVENTS
TORI AMOS APPEARANCE—Singer Tori Amos will be signing copies of her new CD, “Native Invader,” on Fri., Oct. 20 at 7 p.m. at Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th St. Wristbands for event access will be distributed with purchase of “Native Invader” from this Barnes & Noble location beginning at 9 a.m. the day of the event. Amos will only be signing copies of the new CD. In the interest of time she will not be posing for photos or signing any additional items. For more information call (212) 253-0810 or visit bn.com.

ONGOING EVENTS
FILM SCREENINGS—The Epiphany Library, 228 E. 23rd St., screens films every Thursday at 2 p.m. To contact the branch for more information, call (212) 679-2645. 

TOURS OF CENTER FOR JEWISH HISTORY—Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., offers free tours (exclusive of the YUM galleries) on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. Tours last approximately 1 1/2 hours and include the exhibitions of the American Jewish Historical Society, the American Sephardi Federation, the Leo Baeck Institute and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, as well as the Reading Room, Genealogy Institute and other public spaces. Tours for groups of 10 or more can be scheduled by calling (917) 606-8226.

UNION SQUARE WALKING TOURS—The Union Square Partnership presents free, weekly walking tours of Union Square. The 90-minute tour explores the social and political history of the neighborhood through discussions of the people, history, architecture and forces that have shaped this community. You’ll hear how Union Square got its name, see where the legendary Tiffany & Co. once stood and learn how to read the clock (yes, it’s a clock!) on “The Metronome” sculpture and so much more! The tour begins at the Abraham Lincoln statue by the 16th St. transverse in Union Square Park, Sat. at 2 p.m. Look for the guide holding a Union Square: Crossroads of New York sign. Reservations required for groups. For more information, call (212) 517-1826 or visit http://www.unionsquarenyc.org.

FLATIRON WALKING TOURS—The Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) provides free, year-round historic walking tours of the district, led by local historian professional guides. The tours take place every Sunday starting at 11 a.m., and meet at the southwest corner of Madison Square Park (in front of the William Seward statue) at 23rd Street and Broadway. No advance registration is required. The walking tour highlights some of the city’s most notable landmarks, including: the New York Life Insurance Building, the MetLife Clock Tower, the Appellate Courthouse and the Flatiron Building. Historians leading tours are: Miriam Berman, author of Madison Square: The Park and Its Celebrated Landmarks; Mike Kaback and Fred Cookinham. For more information, visit www.flatirondistrict.nyc.

POETRY WORKSHOP—The Epiphany Poets group meets at the Muhlenberg Public Library at 209 W. 23rd Street, between Seventh and Eighth Aves. every third Friday of the month from 2-4 p.m. It is a workshop so each person brings a poem — bring 12 or 13 copies to hand to each person and then discuss each work. The group is helpful and collegial. If there is time, a second poem by those who have brought one can be discussed.

DOWNTOWN MAFIA WALKING TOUR—NYC Gangster Tours presents “The Rise and Fall of the American Mafia Walking Tour” Fridays and Saturdays at 6 p.m. Not for the faint of heart, this premium tour goes from the East Village down to Little Italy and tells the tale of the arrival of a secret sect of Sicilian criminals in the late 19th century, the growth and Americanization of this criminal empire in the 20s and 30s and the slow decline throughout the late 20th century from the rise of the drug trade. This tour stops outside the tenements, cafes, restaurants, social clubs, funeral homes and even alleyways where it all happened. Tours start in front of Lanza’s restaurant, 168 First Ave., near E. 10th St. Fri. and Sat. at 6 p.m., Sun. at 2 p.m. Cost is $35. For more information, call 855-NYGANGS or visit http://www.nycgangstertours.com.

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18 thoughts on “Around and About

  1. Was there a bird walk today? When I arrived at 8.03 there was no one there (20St. at the entrance of Stuyvesant Cove), so I left. Is there a contact for the walk leader so that we may confirm each time?

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  13. Hello !
    Hope you are having a great day. My name is Debbie from Creative Dream Entertainment. I am a big participant of the Summer in the Square Event . This week at Summer in the Square, our special guest will be BATMAN!!! Can you please be so kind as to add onto the list Creative Dream Entertainment as one of the Summer in the Square vendors?
    Creative Dream Entertainment at Summer in the Square , Thursday, July 30th from 1pm-4pm near the Big Yellow Tent ! Arts & Crafts included!!! Can you please also add we will be at the event for the next two Thursday’s with a special Princess Guest for each week.
    Will keep you updated for the last 2 weeks of the event who will be appearing.

    Thank you, please confirm received,

    Have a wonderful evening,
    Best
    Debbie
    CEO
    Creative Dream Entertainment

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