Around and About

CONCERTS
WINDS—The Sylvan Winds presents “Winds of Change,” a concert celebrating music, culture, and history on Thurs., Feb. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at The Cell Theatre, 338 W. 23rd St. The program includes Elliott Schwartz, Daniel Ott, Frank Oteri, Julia Wolfe and Robert Patterson played by Svjetlana Kabalin, flute; Kathy Halvorson, oboe; Nuno Antunes, clarinet; Gina Cuffari, bassoon; Zohar Schondorf, horn. Performing in historic and notable buildings, the ensemble creates informative programs that complement the environs of each space. Program subject to change. Tickets: $25, $20 seniors/students, available at www.thecelltheatre.org or by calling (646) 861-2253 or at the door. 

JAZZ—Jazz Standard, 116 E. 27th St., presents the following concerts, with sets at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. each night:
Feb. 16, Ralph Towner Solo, $30.
Feb. 17-19, Mingus Big Band, $25.
Feb. 20, Mingus Orchestra, $30.
Feb. 21-26, Ravi Coltrane Quartet, ($30 Tues.-Thurs., $35 Fri. and Sat.)
Feb. 27, Mingus Big Band, $25.
Feb. 28, Wolfgang Muthspiel, $25.
Mar. 1-3, George Coleman Birthday Celebration featuring Charles McPherson, $35.
For more information, visit http://www.jazzstandard.com. 

ROCK & MORE—The Gramercy Theatre, 127 E. 23rd St., presents the following concerts:
For tickets, visit thegramercytheatre.com or call (212) 614-6932.
Feb. 21 at 6:30 p.m., Max and Iggor Cavalera, $29.50.
Feb. 24, Hello Halo and January Jane, Face the King, Wake the Sun, Black Satellite, $12.
Mar. 1 at 7 p.m., David Duchovny, $15-$55.
Mar. 2, The Vamps (sold out).
Mar. 3 at 7 p.m., Big Wreck, $20.

ROCK & MORE—Irving Plaza, 17 Irving Pl., presents the following concerts:
For tickets, visit irvingplaza.com or call (212) 777-6800.
Feb. 16 at 7 p.m., Rubix Kube: The 80’s Strikes Back Show with Constantine from “Rock of Ages,” $17.
Feb. 17 at 7 p.m., Ripe and Lawrence, Welshly Arms, $15.
Feb. 19 at 7:30 p.m., Alcest, The Body, Creepers, $23.
Feb. 19 at 11 p.m., The Freedom Party, $10-$20.
Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m., Daya, Frankie, $25.
Feb. 22 at 7 p.m., Tribal Seeds, Raging Fyah, Natalie Rize, $22.
Feb. 23 at 7 p.m., Golden Gate Wingmen, John Kadlecik, Jeff Chimenti, Jay Lane, Reed Mathis, $35.
Feb. 24 at 8 p.m., Badfish (“A Tribute to Sublime”), Sun-Dried Vibes, Fifth Street, $25.
Feb. 25 at 4:50 p.m., Metal Blade’s 35th Anniversary Tour with Whitechapel and more, $22.50.
Feb. 25 at 11 p.m., Brüt, $39.
Mar. 1 at 7 p.m., Dua Lipa, Ro Ransom, $20.
Mar. 2 at 7 p.m., Juice Jay, Belly, Project Pat, $42.50.
Mar. 3, Thundercat (sold out).

THIRD STREET MUSIC SCHOOL SERIES—LiveSOUNDS presents free performances by faculty and their guests on Fridays at Third Street Music School throughout the school year. Concerts take place Friday evenings at 7 p.m. at the Anna Maria Kellen Auditorium at 235 E. 11th St. between 2nd and 3rd Aves. Third Street and its auditorium are wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit thirdstreetmusicschool.org.

Feb. 17, Hugh Sam, piano.
Mar. 3, Susan Friedlander, flute, and Sam LaNasa, piano.

FOLK/POLITICAL/SOCIAL CONCERT SERIES—The Peoples’ Voice Café, an alternative coffeehouse, organizes weekly concerts and events celebrating humanitarian issues and concerns. The cafe is run as a not-for-profit collective and concerts are held Saturdays from 8-10:30 p.m. at The Community Church of New York Unitarian Universalist, 40 E. 35th St. (between Madison and Park Aves. Wheelchair-accessible). Suggested donation: $18; $10 for PVC members; more if you choose; less if you can’t; no one turned away. For more information, call (212) 787-3903 or visit www.peoplesvoicecafe.org.

Feb. 18 is the 70th birthday of folksinger and longtime Peoples’ Voice Cafe volunteer Steve Suffet. Instead of a party, Suffet and his wife are hosting a free folk concert featuring Beth Kotkin, Joel Landy, Sandy Pliskin, Anne Price and Gina Tlamsa. Suffet will perform two or three songs towards the end. Admission is free, but in lieu of a birthday present, a small donation to the Peoples’ Voice Cafe would be appreciated.

Feb. 25, Linnea Paton will perform traditional and contemporary folk songs and Jonny Grave, blues guitarist and songwriter, will also perform.

Mar. 1, New York City Labor Chorus. 

Theater for the New City presents Czechoslovak-American Marionette Theater in “Three Golden Hairs of Grandfather Wisdom,” running Feb. 16-Mar. 5. There will also be a Saturday matinee production of “The Winter Tales.” Both shows are recommended for all ages and are performed by puppeteers and marionettes. See listing for details. (Pictured) Puppet characters in “The Winter Tales” (Photo by Jonathan Slaff)

Theater for the New City presents Czechoslovak-American Marionette Theater in “Three Golden Hairs of Grandfather Wisdom,” running Feb. 16-Mar. 5. (Pictured) Puppet characters in “The Winter Tales” (Photo by Jonathan Slaff)

THEATER
MARIONETTE THEATER—Theater for the New City, 155 First Ave. (between 9th and 10th Sts.), presents Czechoslovak-American Marionette Theater in “Three Golden Hairs of Grandfather Wisdom,” running Feb. 16-Mar. 5. There will also be a Saturday matinee production of “The Winter Tales.” Both shows are recommended for all ages. “Three Golden Hairs of Grandfather Wisdom” is drawn from fairy tales that are cherished by children of the Czech Lands. Written and directed by Vit Horejs, it is performed by four performers, four dozen marionettes of various sizes and a mounted deer’s head. The evening is named for a story in which a charcoal burner’s son, predestined by his fairy godmother to marry a princess, is sent by his angered father-in-law king on a quest for the sun’s three golden hairs in hope that the young man will perish. Performances are Thurs.-Sat. at 8 p.m., Sun. at 3 p.m. $15 general admission, $10 for kids. “The Winter Tales,” playing on Saturdays at 3 p.m., is a one-man show performed by Vit Horejs and a troupe of antique wooden puppets that speak in a dozen voices, dance, play violin, swim and fly. It is comprised of three Czech fairy tales (performed in English) replete with mountain wizards, clever village maidens and spirits. They are: “The Snow Maiden Snehurka,” in which a childless couple find a little girl in a winter blizzard; “The Twelve Months,” in which an orphaned girl is sent to fetch strawberries from the forest in the middle of a blizzard and meets twelve kind men representing the twelve months, and “Salt Over Gold,” a Czech version of the Slovak tale that is staged in Three Golden Hairs of Grandfather Wisdom.” Tickets are $12 for adults, $8 for kids. Recommended for ages 4 to 104. Running time: 55 minutes. Box office: (212) 254-1109. For more information, visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net.

MUSICAL—The Girl Behind The Curtain presents the world premiere of a new musical, “All Aboard!” beginning previews at The Theater at the 14th Street Y, 344 E. 14th St. between First and Second Aves., on Fri., Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 18 at 2 p.m. Opening night is set for Sat., Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. The show unravels the mysterious tales of three different couples and the three very different journeys they face. There are Larry and Kim, a pair whose happy marriage is threatened when Larry announces his desire to have an affair… but only with Kim’s permission. Jake and Karen are a professional pair of political spin doctors who encounter a scandal that is so hot they may end up scorched. Finally, Marie, a wildly successful solo entrepreneur is approached by the magnetic Terry, who just so happens to be her Angel of Death. Music and lyrics are by Al Tapper with a book by Tony Sportiello, and Warren Scott Friedman directs. For more information or for tickets, $50 general, $25 seniors and students, call (646) 395-4310 or visit allaboardthemusical.com. 

FOUR PLAYS BY BLACK PLAYWRIGHTS—Theater for the New City Executive Director Crystal Field presents The Xoregos Performing Company’s “Luigi & Langston (Pirandello & Hughes)” at the Community Space Theater, 155 First Ave. between E. 9th and 10th Sts. through Feb. 19. Four one-act plays by famous and emerging playwrights all linked to African-American History Month will be performed. They include world premieres of “Calico and Lennie” by Grace Cavalieri and “Harlem Slang” by Michele Cannon. Collectively, the works shine a light on the African-American experience as seen through the eyes of great artists from the nation’s history and contemporary writers. Performances are Thurs.-Sat. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 3 p.m. $15 general admission, $10 for students and seniors. Tickets are available at the door (cash only), online at smarttix.com or by calling (212) 254-1109. For more information, visit theaterforthenewcity.net.

DARK COMEDY—Theater for the New City, 155 First Ave. at E. 10th St., will present the American premiere of “Appendage,” running through Feb. 26. The dark comedy is staged by Mary Tierney, founder of the Quaigh Lunchtime Series and written by Irish expatriate Derek Murphy. “Appendage” begins with a minor traffic accident in which Jack is struck by Peter’s car. Peter takes Jack, a stranger into his home to recuperate. Jack, in no hurry to leave Peter’s wealthy American home, becomes more menacing as the evening and the alcohol progresses. As night takes hold, both men share the most intimate and profound of secrets, and both protagonists, as it turns out, are mourning the same woman. The title reflects the author’s view of both men in relationship to the woman they shared, as in something lesser attached to something greater. Performances are Tues.-Sat. at 8 p.m., Sun. at 3 p.m. $15 general admission. To purchase tickets, call (212) 254-1109 or www.theaterforthenewcity.net.

FRIGID New York @ Horse Trade presents the 2017 “FRIGID Festival” at The Kraine Theater, and Under St. Marks running Feb. 15-Mar. 5. (Pictured) Scene from a featured play, “A Fifth Dimension: An Unauthorized Twilight Zone Parody” (Photo by Christ Weigandt)

FRIGID New York @ Horse Trade presents the 2017 “FRIGID Festival” at The Kraine Theater, and Under St. Marks running Feb. 15-Mar. 5. (Pictured) Scene from a featured play, “A Fifth Dimension: An Unauthorized Twilight Zone Parody” (Photo by Christ Weigandt)

FRIGID FESTIVAL—FRIGID New York @ Horse Trade presents the 2017 “FRIGID Festival” at The Kraine Theater (85 E. 4th St. between 2nd Ave. and Bowery) and Under St. Marks (94 St. Marks Place between 1st Ave. and Ave. A), running through Mar. 5. One hundred percent of box office proceeds will go directly to the artists. “FRIGID” features the New York independent theater scene’s ideas of what a theater festival can be. Tickets ($8-$20) are available for advance purchase at www.horsetrade.info. All shows run 60 minutes or less. For a full schedule, visit the aforementioned website. Below are some of the festival’s offerings.

“18 days. 48 Girls” by St. Olaf Productions from Naugatuck, CT, written and performed by Courtney Antonioli, directed by Chris Chan Roberson. 48 teenagers. 18 days. 1 all-girls sleepaway camp.  0 cell phones. A whole lotta “togetherness.” One camp director’s true stories about the time she didn’t strangle children, but so wanted to at times. $10.

“A Crisis Called New York” by Step1 Theatre Project from New York, NY, written by Alisha Espinosa. The rent? Astronomical. The apartments? Miniscule. The commute? Don’t even get me started. But damn, what is it about this city that makes you want to scream, or drink, or run, or make questionable sexual choices?

“A Fifth Dimension: An Unauthorized Twilight Zone Parody” by Sour Grapes Productions from Brooklyn, NY, written and directed by Genny Yosco. You are traveling to a dimension where iconic Twilight Zone episodes are staged right before your very eyes, and where dolls come to life and gremlins are on the wing.

“Ain’t That Rich” by Double Backbone from San Francisco, CA, written and performed by Kate Robards, directed by Chris Murray. Kate grew up broke in an East Texas town. When she grows up, she marries into the One Percent. Now she has a unique look at what money can and cannot buy, including the salvation for a loved one.

“An Evening Conference on Feminism and Equality at Large at the Fantabulosa Esoteric Cabaret Dada” by Untitled Theatre Collective from New York, NY, written and directed by Lucca Damilano. At the Cabaret Voltaire – the Swiss nightclub home of the Dadaists – five important artists of the movement take the stage after being overlooked for so long: its female innovators.

“Awkward But Graceful,” written and performed by Nataša Warasch from New York, NY

Directed by Joe Paradise. Inspired by the sitcom “The Golden Girls” Nataša packs her bags and naively embarks on a journey from the Austrian countryside to America. Her dreams of making it in show business are challenged as she’s exploited in Los Angeles and becomes homeless in Washington Heights before making a decision that alters her life.

“Black!” written and performed by Michael Washington Brown from Phoenix, AZ. Four individuals who will each describe their personal experience with the word “black.” We will learn about their stories, how their lives are affected by this word, whether positively or otherwise, and most important, their individual perspectives.

POLITICAL DRAMA—As Washington closes the door on refugees, Metropolitan Playhouse, 220 E. 4th St., presents “Leah, The Forsaken,” Augustin Daly’s trenchant drama of Jewish refugees in Austria in 1862, running through Mar. 12. Leah, a Jewish refugee fleeing persecution in Hungary, is forbidden by law to pass the night in an Austrian town. But there she wins the love of Rudolf, a Christian citizen. When a particularly zealous persecutor convinces Rudolf she has betrayed him, he quickly renounces her. Leah retreats to her exile, but only after bestowing her and her people’s curse on him and his progeny. Can there be any light in such a darkened time, and what could possibly light it? Director is Francis X. Kuhn. The play was made into several films. Performances are Thurs.-Sat. at 7:30 p.m.; and Sun. at 3 p.m. Additional performances: Feb. 13 at 7:30 p.m. (Pay what you will.), Mar. 1 and 8 at 3 p.m., Sat., Mar. 4 and 11 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $30 general; $25 students/seniors; $10 children, and may be purchased online at http://www.metropolitanplayhouse.org or calling (800) 838-3006.

Irish Repertory Theatre presents “Crackskull Row” through Mar. 13. Melding reality and myth, “Crackskull Row” is the story of an Irish family’s desperate actions and forbidden loves.

Irish Repertory Theatre presents “Crackskull Row” through Mar. 13. Melding reality and myth, “Crackskull Row” is the story of an Irish family’s desperate actions and forbidden loves.

DRAMA—Irish Repertory Theatre, 132 W. 22nd St., presents “Crackskull Row” in the W. Scott McLucas Studio Theater, running through Mar. 13. Rasher Moorigan has a secret that only his mother knows. Tonight – for the first time in over thirty years – mother and son spend May Eve together in a wreck of a house down the backlanes of Dublin. Melding reality and myth, “Crackskull Row” is the story of an Irish family’s desperate actions and forbidden loves. Recommended for mature audiences. Tickets are $50. Performances are Wed. at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m., Thurs. at 7 p.m., Fri. at 8 p.m., Sat. at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. and Sun. at 3 p.m. Visit irishrep.org or call (212) 727-2737.

MUSICAL—Linda Gross Theater, 336 W. 20th St, presents the world premiere of the musical “The Band’s Visit,” featuring Tony Shalhoub (“Monk”). An Egyptian Police Band arrives in Israel to play a concert. After a mix-up at the border, they are sent to a remote village in the middle of the desert. With no bus until morning and no hotel in sight, these unlikely travelers are taken in by the locals. Under the spell of the desert sky, their lives become intertwined in the most unexpected ways. This play is adapted from a screenplay that received 36 major international awards. Director is David Cromer, with music and lyrics by David Yazbek. Tickets start at $75. For tickets or more information, visit atlantictheater.org. 

MUSICAL COMEDY—The creators of “Bayside! The Musical” and “Full House! The Musical!”, Bob and Tobly Smith, present “90210: The Musical!” a parody of the 90s teen show, now playing at Theatre 80, 80 St. Marks Pl. This show invites viewers to relive the drama, the drinking and drugging and the sideburns. It answers the important questions: Can Brandon and Brenda be 90210 cool? Will Steve Sanders be eaten by a Sharknado? Who has resting Brenda face? Can Emily Valentine kick her crippling U4EA addiction in time to burn down the school? Will Tori Spelling graduate? The production is directed and choreographed by Donald Garverick. Tegan Miller is the musical director. Show contains partial nudity and may not be appropriate for people under 16. Performances will be held on Thurs. at 8 p.m. and Fri. and Sat. at 7 p.m. Tickets ($25.50-$35.50) are available by visiting 90210themusical.com. 

COMEDY—Thirteenth Street Repertory Company, 50 W. 13th St. between Fifth and Sixth Aves., presents the return of “The Accidental Pervert,” a comedy that tells the awkwardly poignant story of a boy’s journey into manhood after discovering his dad’s X-rated video tapes hidden in a bedroom closet. He subsequently develops an addiction to pornography that continues until the age of 26, when he meets his wife-to-be and finds himself struggling to find the balance between fantasy and reality. Performances are Fri. and Sat. at 7 p.m. Tickets are $49 and available by calling (212) 352-3101 or visit www.theaccidentalpervert.com.

AERIAL DISPLAYS—Daryl Roth Theatre, 103 E. 15th St., presents “Wayra Fuerza Bruta.” Set to a soundtrack that ebbs and flows from thumping club tunes to calm New World music, this kaleidoscopic show demolishes the fourth wall, extending the stage over audience members’ heads as suspended performers seem to walk on air or tumble up a Technicolor wall of cloth. The show does not use seats.  Audience members are on their feet during the 80-minute performance and may be asked to move and/or participate. The show uses strobe lights, loud noises, water, mist and fog. Performances run: Tues.-Thurs. At 8 p.m., Fri. and Sat. at 7 and 10 p.m. and Sun. at 7 p.m. Tickets are $79-$99. For more information, visit www.fuerzabrutanyc.com. 

OTHER PERFORMANCES
COMEDY/VARIETY—No Name Comedy/Variety presents a shows at Otto’s Shrunken Head, 538 E. 14th St. between Aves. A and B on Fri., Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. Lineup includes “Fish Out of Agua” author/storyteller Michele Carlo (Radio Free Brooklyn), Kevin Avery (writer on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver”), “G.I. Jew,” Benari Poulton (Laughing Liberally) and Charles McBee (Laughs on FOX). No Name house band The Summer Replacements, featuring Carl “Babyfreak” Fortunato and Fernando “Dr. Sandman” Morales-Gonzales, will also perform. No cover, no minimum. Performers subject to change. For more No Name information, contact (347) 885-3466 or NoNameNYC@hotmail.com.

OPEN MIC—The Nuyorican Poets Cafe 236 E. Third St., between Aves. B and C, presents “Open Mic Mondays” every Monday at 8 p.m. except holidays. Hosted by Olivia Custodio, this weekly event is a boisterous free-for-all of poetry, hip hop, monologues, acoustic singer-songwriter performances and anything else that a person can do in five minutes on a stage; packed with young artists and their fans, this show is guaranteed to be more fun than whatever you normally do on a Monday night; no cover, one-drink minimum. For more information, call (212) 505-8183 or visit www.nuyorican.org. The cafe is wheelchair accessible, but calling ahead of time is recommended so staff can accommodate wheelchair users.

POETRY SLAM—The Nuyorican Poets Cafe, 236 E. Third St., between Aves. B and C, presents its Wednesday Night Slam Open. Jive Poetic hosts this energetic event, the cafe’s proving ground for emerging poets and experienced artists who want to try out new work. Anyone can sign up for a performance slot, but only one winner per week will advance to the Friday Night Poetry Slam; $7 event takes place every Wednesday at 9 p.m., except for the first Wednesday of the month. To order tickets, visit www.nuyorican.org. For more information, call (212) 505-8183. The cafe is wheelchair accessible, but calling ahead of time is recommended so staff can accommodate wheelchair users.

OPEN MIC—“The Open Mic Downstairs” runs every Tuesday at 9 p.m. at Under St. Marks (94 St. Marks Pl. between First Ave. and Ave. A). Dan Ricker, Kaitlyn O’Connor and Mike Milazzo have taken the reins with spoken word artists, musicians, comedians and other creative folks invited to put their two cents in. Cover is $3. For more information or to purchase tickets in advance visit www.horsetrade.info.

POETRY SLAM & OPEN MIC—The Nuyorican Poets Cafe 236 E. Third St., between Aves. B and C, presents its Friday Night Poetry Slam each week at 10 p.m. Host Mahogany Browne curates the most popular and longest-running slam poetry series in New York City. Nationally renowned poets and rising stars compete for a slot on the cafe’s Slam Team. $10 regular admission, $20 for a limited number of reserved seats. A free open mic follows each Friday Night Poetry Slam. To order tickets, visit www.nuyorican.org. For more information, call (212) 505-8183. The cafe is wheelchair accessible, but calling ahead of time is recommended so staff can accommodate wheelchair users. 

FAMILY/CHILDREN
INTERACTIVE PLAY—FRIGID New York @ Horse Trade in association with the Panto-WHAT? Company presents “The Mystery at Ginger Creek: An Interactive Adventure” on Sat., Feb. 18 at 1 p.m. at The Kraine Theater (85 E. 4th St. between 2nd Ave. and Bowery). Tickets ($20 general, $15 students and seniors, $12 for kids) may be purchased in advance at www.horsetrade.info. In “Ginger Creek,” curious characters and perplexing events are the norm. Join Hank O’Hara and Sally Silver Gunz, as they run from the law, stumble over clues and suffer from amnesia. Their lives depend on you, as they attempt to solve a murder and prove their innocence. This is an interactive family show for ages 7 and up. 

BOOK READINGS & ACTIVITIES—Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th Street, presents story time on most Saturdays. The stories are as follows. For more information call (212) 253-0810 or visit bn.com.

Sat., Feb. 18 at 11 a.m., Mighty Mighty Construction Site by Sherri Duskey Rinker.
Sat., Feb. 25 at 11 a.m., Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss with coloring and activities.
Sat., Mar. 4 at 11 a.m., Good Night Good Night Construction Site by Sherri Duskey Rinker. 

BOOK READINGS AND AUTHOR TALKS—Books of Wonder, 18 W. 18th St., presents the following authors reading their books:

Sat., Feb. 18 from 1-3 p.m., there will be a double launch for Ame Dyckman’s picture book You Don’t Want a Unicorn and Jessie Sima will present Not Quite Narwhal.
Sun., Feb. 19 from 1-3 p.m., present a launch party for I Am Not a Chair by Ross Burach.
Sun., Feb. 26 from 1-3 p.m., The Time Museum by Matthew Loux.
Mar. 1 from 6-8 p.m., We Are Brothers by Alexandra Penfold and Eda Caban.

BOOK READINGS—The Strand Bookstore, 828 Broadway at 12th St., presents story time on most Saturdays and Sundays. All children must be accompanied by a parent for the duration of their visit.

Feb. 18-19 at 11 a.m.-noon and 2-3 p.m., Clifford storytime and crafts.
Feb. 25-26 at 11 a.m.-noon and 2-3 p.m., Pete the Cat storytime and crafts.

For more information, visit strandbooks.com or call (212) 473-1452. 

THEATER—TADA! Youth Theater, 15 W. 28th St., presents an original musical called “The History Mystery!”, which opened on Inauguration Day and closes on Presidents Day, Feb. 20. In this show, questions are asked about race and women’s rights being stomped on by the government and history, but a shout out is given to our new president and how scared kids actually are of him! Three friends travel back in time to meet famous and “not so famous” kids who changed the world such as Ben Franklin, Eleanor Roosevelt, the Wright brothers, Suffragettes, and Martin Luther King Jr. TADA!’s actors are between the ages of 8-18. Tickets start at $10 at tadatheater.com.

LEGO BATMAN MOVIE EVENT—Barnes & Noble, 33 E. 17th Street, presents a LEGO Batman movie event on Sat., Feb. 25 at 4 p.m. (also on Mar. 11), to celebrate the release of the movie. At each event, kids can collect two limited edition trading cards (while supplies last) featuring characters from the film. The cards collected at all three events will unveil a special scene. Guests will enjoy giveaways, make and play themed moments with LEGO bricks. For more information, call (212) 253-0810 or visit www.bn.com.

CUB/BOY SCOUTS PACK 422—Scout Pack 422 is part of the Greater NY Councils and the Big Apple District and is sponsored by The Epiphany R.C. Church at 373 Second Ave. off of 21st St. Meetings are held in the Parish Hall. Cub Scouts meet on Wednesdays at 7 p.m., Boy Scouts meet on Thursdays at 6:45 p.m. Parents and new scouts are invited to meetings. For more information, call Maureen Riley at (917) 837-3311.

CUB/BOY SCOUTS PACK 414—Scout Troop 414 is part of the Greater New York Councils and the Big Apple District and is sponsored by the Immaculate Conception Church, 414 E. 14th St. Meetings are held in the school auditorium every Tuesday evening from 6:30-8 p.m. Parents and new Scouts are invited to meetings. For more information, visit www.troop414nyc.org.

DISCUSSIONS
FINANCIAL GUIDANCE—The following free informational events will take place at the Science, Industry & Business Library, 188 Madison Ave. at 34th St.

Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. “ETFs and Mutual Funds.” Simon Brady explains how mutual funds and Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) are similar and how are they different. Learn how each of these investment types work in order to make informed investment decisions. Presented by the Financial Planning Association of NY.

Feb. 22 at 3 p.m. “Finding the Right Investment Advisor.” Peter J. Creedon discusses what you should know before you hire a financial professional: Credentials, Compensation, and Standards of Customer Care. Presented by the Financial Planning Association of NY

Feb. 25 at noon. “Tax-Smart Investing.” What are the best ways to shelter investment income? Whether you invest in individual securities, mutual funds or ETFs, there are tax issues and strategies you need to be aware of to minimize your tax liability. Presented by Sallie Mullins Thompson, CPA/PFS of the Financial Planning Association of NY.

For more information visit nypl.org/sibl.

The National Arts Club presents, “Through Your Eyes: The NAC Collects,” running through Feb. 22. This is the third annual exhibition featuring works from the personal collections of club members. (Pictured) Image by Will Barnet

The National Arts Club presents, “Through Your Eyes: The NAC Collects,” running through Feb. 22. This is the third annual exhibition featuring works from the personal collections of club members. (Pictured) Image by Will Barnet

EXHIBITS
NAC MEMBER COLLECTORS—The National Arts Club’s Grand Gallery, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents, “Through Your Eyes: The NAC Collects,” running through Feb. 22. To celebrate the joys of collecting and connoisseurship, the Fine Arts Committee presents the third annual exhibition featuring works from the personal collections of club members. From the classical to the cutting edge, the Grand Gallery will be filled with works of art that will offer the NAC community the opportunity to share interests and treasures. For more information, visit nationalartsclub.org or call (212) 475-3424. 

EMBROIDERED WORKS/POLITICAL—Lyons Wier Gallery’s Project Space, 203 W. 20th St. at Seventh Ave., presents a redux of Stephanie Hirsch’s exhibition of embroidered, beaded works, “Indestructible,” running again through Feb. 18. When Hirsch’s show “Indestructible” opened last November it was during the U.S. elections. People came in and read her mantras, “All Of This Is Temporary,” “It Did Not Ruin Her,” “In Time It Will All Make Sense, “Let It All Go,” among others, as deeply political. There was an immense overtone of doom and gloom. But, now that people have had time to digest and evaluate their emotions, conversations around the art have shifted from disillusionment to empowerment. Her affirmations “All Of This Is Temporary!” “It Did Not Ruin Her!” etc., now have a different tenor, shedding new light and perspective on the work. Hours: Tues.-Sat. from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, call (212) 242-6220 or visit www.lyonswiergallery.com.

ABSTRACT PAINTINGS—Lyons Wier Gallery, 542 W. 24th St., presents “Supernature” by Jeff Muhs, running through Feb. 25. Muhs creates work that has become its own unique process of natural creation and discovery.  This process began when he first stumbled upon a more spontaneous method of mark-making using improvised brushes and black oil paint over a highly prepared surface. Through the random and overlapping application of paint thinned to various degrees, an organic black and white cosmos evolves. Hours: Tues.-Sat. from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, call (212) 242-6220 or visit www.lyonswiergallery.com.

PAINTINGS—The National Arts Club’s Marquis Gallery, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents works by Libbet Loughnan on view through Mar. 4. Loughnan’s paintings reflect a childhood rich in family warmth under the Australian sun, stories encountered across countries in adult life – particularly in NYC – and a desire for more reflection on the place of humans within nature. Usually working with dark and bright acrylic on wood, Loughnan sometimes produces watercolors on paper and sculptures. She recently won the President’s Prize at The National Arts Club, (March, 2016) and has exhibited in several countries. For more information, visit nationalartsclub.org or call (212) 475-3424.

PHOTOS OF BILLIE HOLIDAY—The National Arts Club’s Trask Gallery, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents Jerry Dantzic’s “Photography of Billie Holiday at Sugar Hill: 1957,” on view through Mar. 4. In 1957, New York photojournalist Dantzic spent time with the iconic singer during a week-long run of performances at the Newark, New Jersey nightclub Sugar Hill. Dantzic’s photographs have appeared in such publications as the New York Times, Life, Look, Vanity Fair and American Photo. His work is also in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art. For more information, visit nationalartsclub.org or call (212) 475-3424.

DRAWINGS—The National Arts Club’s Gregg Gallery, 15 Gramercy Park South, presents “Outside the Lines: The Fourth Annual NAC Drawing Invitational” on view through Mar. 4. Drawings have for centuries offered viewers the most immediate and intimate glimpse of an artist’s process and vision. Today, through the use of unconventional media, artists have energized the force and impact of line. The Annual NAC Drawing Invitational brings together an eclectic group of artists who continue to challenge the concept of drawing to create powerful expressions through line. Included are works by Elsa Mora, Terry Winters, Kendall Shaw and Jimmy Wright. For more information, visit nationalartsclub.org or call (212) 475-3424.

FASHION (BLACK DESIGNERS)—Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Seventh Ave. at W. 27th St., presents “Black Fashion Designers,” an exhibit examining the impact made by designers of African descent on the world of fashion, running through May 17. Drawing exclusively from The Museum at FIT’s permanent collection, the exhibition features approximately 75 fashion objects that illustrate the individual styles of more than 60 designers, placing them within a wider fashion context. Objects date from the 1950s to the present, including mid-century evening gowns by Anne Lowe and the jovial, yet controversial, work of Patrick Kelly from the 1980s. Contemporary pieces include Lagos-based designer Maki Oh’s spring 2013 dress, which reconceptualizes Nigerian traditions, and pieces from the latest runways of established designers, such as Tracy Reese, and emerging talents, such as Charles Harbison. The exhibition addresses the influence of black fashion models as well, by highlighting milestone events, such as “The Ebony Fashion Fair.” For more information, visit www.fitnyc.edu.

FOR SENIORS
PLAY READING  GROUP—The Stein Senior Center, 204 E. 23rd St., has launched a play reading group, led by Nancy Finn and Carmine Bracale. All are invited to group meetings on the first and third Fridays of each month from 10 a.m.-noon. Participants will be looking at plays from Shakespeare to modern. Scripts with large print will be supplied. No experience with the plays necessary. A contribution is requested.

ART HISTORY CLASS–The Stein Center, 204 E. 23rd St., offers an art history class every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 12 noon. Participants enjoy examples of visual arts, including painting, sculpture and architecture from around the world. Awesomely beautiful and culturally important art works are projected on a large screen accompanied by bold face printed text and spoken comments by leader Judy Collischan, Ph.D. Discussion, participation and interaction are encouraged. No experience with art or its history is necessary. A modest contribution is requested, and all are welcome to attend.

OTHER EVENTS
GHOST TOUR—Merchant’s House, 29 E. 4th St., presents the “Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour” on Fri., Feb. 17 at 6:30 (sold out) and 7 p.m. Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. Tour is 50-60 minutes. Merchants House is a museum with a mission of educating the public about the domestic life of a wealthy merchant family and their four Irish servants from 1835-1865. For tickets for the 7 p.m. tour, $30, visits merchantshouse.org. Upcoming ghost tours are Fri., Mar. 17, Apr. 21 and May 19.

ONGOING EVENTS
FILM SCREENINGS—The Epiphany Library, 228 E. 23rd St., screens films every Thursday at 2 p.m. To contact the branch for more information, call (212) 679-2645. 

TOURS OF CENTER FOR JEWISH HISTORY—Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th St., offers free tours (exclusive of the YUM galleries) on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. Tours last approximately 1 1/2 hours and include the exhibitions of the American Jewish Historical Society, the American Sephardi Federation, the Leo Baeck Institute and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, as well as the Reading Room, Genealogy Institute and other public spaces. Tours for groups of 10 or more can be scheduled by calling (917) 606-8226.

UNION SQUARE WALKING TOURS—The Union Square Partnership presents free, weekly walking tours of Union Square. The 90-minute tour explores the social and political history of the neighborhood through discussions of the people, history, architecture and forces that have shaped this community. You’ll hear how Union Square got its name, see where the legendary Tiffany & Co. once stood and learn how to read the clock (yes, it’s a clock!) on “The Metronome” sculpture and so much more! The tour begins at the Abraham Lincoln statue by the 16th St. transverse in Union Square Park, Sat. at 2 p.m. Look for the guide holding a Union Square: Crossroads of New York sign. Reservations required for groups. For more information, call (212) 517-1826 or visit www.unionsquarenyc.org.

FLATIRON WALKING TOURS—The Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) provides free, year-round historic walking tours of the district, led by local historian professional guides. The tours take place every Sunday starting at 11 a.m., and meet at the southwest corner of Madison Square Park (in front of the William Seward statue) at 23rd Street and Broadway. No advance registration is required. The walking tour highlights some of the city’s most notable landmarks, including: the New York Life Insurance Building, the MetLife Clock Tower, the Appellate Courthouse and the Flatiron Building. Historians leading tours are: Miriam Berman, author of Madison Square: The Park and Its Celebrated Landmarks; Mike Kaback and Fred Cookinham. For more information visit www.flatirondistrict.nyc.

POETRY WORKSHOP (NEW LOCATION)—The Epiphany Poets group now meets at the Muhlenberg Public Library at 209 West 23rd Street, between Seventh and Eighth Aves. from 2-4 p.m. The group had previously been meeting every third Friday of the month from 2 to 4 p.m. at Epiphany Library, 228 E. 23rd St. All are welcome to participate. It is a workshop so each person brings a poem — bring 12 or 13 copies to hand to each person and then discuss each work. The group is helpful and collegial. If there is time, a second poem by those who have brought one can be discussed.

DOWNTOWN MAFIA WALKING TOUR—NYC Gangster Tours presents “The Rise and Fall of the American Mafia Walking Tour” Fridays and Saturdays at 6 p.m. Not for the faint of heart, this premium tour goes from the East Village down to Little Italy and tells the tale of the arrival of a secret sect of Sicilian criminals in the late 19th century, the growth and Americanization of this criminal empire in the 20s and 30s and the slow decline throughout the late 20th century from the rise of the drug trade. This tour stops outside the tenements, cafes, restaurants, social clubs, funeral homes and even alleyways where it all happened. Tours start in front of Lanza’s restaurant, 168 First Ave., near E. 10th St. Fri. and Sat. at 6 p.m., Sun. at 2 p.m. Cost is $35. For more information, call 855-NYGANGS or visit www.nycgangstertours.com.

17 thoughts on “Around and About

  1. Was there a bird walk today? When I arrived at 8.03 there was no one there (20St. at the entrance of Stuyvesant Cove), so I left. Is there a contact for the walk leader so that we may confirm each time?

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  13. Hello !
    Hope you are having a great day. My name is Debbie from Creative Dream Entertainment. I am a big participant of the Summer in the Square Event . This week at Summer in the Square, our special guest will be BATMAN!!! Can you please be so kind as to add onto the list Creative Dream Entertainment as one of the Summer in the Square vendors?
    Creative Dream Entertainment at Summer in the Square , Thursday, July 30th from 1pm-4pm near the Big Yellow Tent ! Arts & Crafts included!!! Can you please also add we will be at the event for the next two Thursday’s with a special Princess Guest for each week.
    Will keep you updated for the last 2 weeks of the event who will be appearing.

    Thank you, please confirm received,

    Have a wonderful evening,
    Best
    Debbie
    CEO
    Creative Dream Entertainment

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