Green Party candidate running for now vacant Assembly seat

Adrienne Craig-Williams hopes to make rent more affordable for stabilized as well as market-rate tenants. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On April 24, four candidates will be on the ballot in the hope of winning the now-vacant Assembly seat previously occupied by State Senator Brian Kavanagh.

Out of those four, two are Third Party candidates, Juan Pagan of the Reform Party and Adrienne Craig-Williams of the Green Party. They will face off against Democrat Harvey Epstein and Republican Bryan Cooper.

Craig-Williams, a resident of the East Village (formerly Peter Cooper Village), is running on a platform of justice system reform and affordable housing.

Prior to the holiday weekend, she discussed her campaign with Town & Village over coffee at Ninth Street Espresso (which is actually on East 10th Street).

Craig-Williams, 37, officially launched her campaign at the beginning of March. She would have started sooner, but didn’t know she was running until February when an expected party candidate decided to back out.

However, Craig-Williams, who’s been active in her party since 2004, usually to help champion its candidates, insisted she’s in it to win it.

Responses to her candidacy have been encouraging, she said, and no one has attempted to talk her out of it. “I don’t think people consider the Green Party a threat,” she admitted, “unless they want to blame the party for something.”

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NY Senate Democrats’ future unclear as results come in

By Sabina Mollot

The New York State Senate, which is where tenant-friendly legislation goes to die, may remain that way for at least a couple of years longer, though some district results are still unclear.

Local Democrats had hoped to “ride Hillary Clinton’s pantsuit tails,” as State Senator Brad Hoylman recently put it, and gain a majority, but as of Town & Village’s Wednesday press time, two races were so close that there is a possibility of challenges and changes due to paper ballots.

In the 8th senatorial district, Democrat John Brooks got 45.47 percent of the vote compared with Republican Michael Venditto who got 45.44 percent, according to the unofficial results posted on the State Board of Elections website. In the 5th district, Republican Carl Marcelino was leading slightly with 46.73 percent, compared with Democrat James Gaughgran with 45.03, also according to the BOE’s unofficial results.

“There might be legal challenges,” said Hoylman, adding, “Sometimes these things take weeks to resolve.”

Hoylman, who easily won reelection against an Independent candidate, Rabbi Stephen Roberts, said he was trying to remain positive about the rest of the state. He didn’t want to speculate on the outcome of the close races, admitting attaining majority status “may take a cycle more than Democrats had hoped.”

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Local voters come out for Clinton as Trump takes the White House

On Tuesday, a polling place at 360 First Avenue had a line spilling down the block. Many voters who spoke with T&V said they were supporting Hillary Clinton and local Democratic elected officials easily won reelection. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

On Tuesday, a polling place at 360 First Avenue had a line spilling down the block. Many voters who spoke with T&V said they were supporting Hillary Clinton and local Democratic elected officials easily won reelection. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Voter turnout was high at polling places throughout Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village in this historic presidential election, with some residents saying that crowds seemed to surpass even those from 2008. Although some sites throughout the city reported broken scanners, voters at the ST/PCV polling places T&V visited on Tuesday morning said that the worst problems they faced were long lines, and many said that it wasn’t a burden to wait.

“I feel like it’s my moral duty to vote,” said Peter Cooper Village resident Max Hague, noting that he cast his vote for Hillary Clinton. “I voted because I don’t want to live in a fascist country.”

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No primary scheduled in 74th Assembly District, but no one tells voters – again

Helpful signs like the ones pictured above were nowhere to be found on Tuesday.

Helpful signs like the ones pictured above were nowhere to be found on Tuesday.

By Sabina Mollot

On Tuesday, Primary Day, there was no polling in the 74th Assembly District, due to no uncontested races. However, voters in the district, which includes Stuyvesant Town and Kips Bay, weren’t given notice of this, leading some to venture out to do their civic duty and be counted as they would do any other voting day.

“Just walked to polling place at 283 Avenue C only to discover nothing going on and definitely no signs,” one annoyed reader told Town & Village in an email on Tuesday. “Went to security to be informed that the Board of Elections notified them at about noon that since no one was running in our district they would save money and not open. Save money great… but what else do they have to do but inform voters?”

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