T&V asks teens about governor’s free CUNY tuition proposal

Interviews by Maya Rader

Governor Andrew Cuomo has proposed making tuition free at CUNY and SUNY colleges for students with households earning under $125,000. Town & Village asked students at Clinton High School for Writers and Artists if this would impact where they choose to go to school.

feb9-clinton-george

George Weathers III
“I feel that I would probably want to stay in the city or the state rather than go outside and spend more money. My parent does not make over 125 thousand dollars, so I would want to get the free education.”

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Soapbox: A place for intellectual retirees

By Elaine Greene Weisburg

Members of The New School’s Institute for Retired Professionals are accustomed to hearing fellow members express their gratitude for this Greenwich Village learning center. This reporter, a member since 2005, has often heard the following comment in one form or another: “The IRP saved my life.”

Of the dozen or so IRP retirees living in Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village, several have been members for two decades. Among them are Rhonda Gelb who went from school guidance counselor to retirement counselor at J.P. Morgan; Harriett Zwerling, who taught two generations of fourth graders in Greenpoint; and Beverly Butler, a retired city social worker.

For over 50 years this arm of The New School has been an inspirational pioneer in the lifelong education movement, a movement that the aging of the baby boomer generation is actively fueling. The IRP, although a part of a university, does not draw upon its faculty. We practice peer learning which means we, the members, run our program and conduct our classes under the guidance of the IRP executive director.

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New Epiphany principal aims to build students’ confidence

Stuyvesant Town resident Kate McHugh has replaced James Hayes as principal at Epiphany School. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

Stuyvesant Town resident Kate McHugh has replaced James Hayes as principal at Epiphany School. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

After nearly four decades, The Epiphany School will have a new principal.

Former principal — and now school foundation president — James Hayes left the position in June to much fanfare and a 200-person flash mob.

Taking over for him is the former assistant principal, Stuyvesant Town resident Kate McHugh, who joined the school 15 years ago as a science teacher. She is also a graduate of the Catholic school, which now has 560 students.

During a recent interview, McHugh said she’s not planning any major changes, just tweaks to the current curriculum with the goal of doing what it takes to make sure students are confident, both in their faith and in being prepared for the realities of the day’s highly technological world.

“We’ve increased the amount of technology a lot in 15 years,” McHugh said, “mirroring what’s going on in society.”

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A.P. now P.S. 40’s principal for a year

Stephanie Lukas (Photo by Maya Rader)

Stephanie Lukas (Photo by Maya Rader)

By Maya Rader

In the coming 2016-17 school year at P.S. 40 elementary school, assistant principal Stephanie Lukas will assume the role of acting principal while Susan Felder, the current principal, takes part in a year-long fellowship program. Daria Agosta, a fifth grade teacher, will take over as assistant principal in Lukas’s stead.

Lukas has been assistant principal for ten years. Before she came to P.S. 40, she taught kindergarten uptown, first at P.S. 151 and then at P.S. 165. The latter had a partnership with the Professional Development School program, meaning professors from Columbia University’s Teachers College would come to Lukas’s classroom to do research. In turn, Lukas received student teachers and could take free classes at Teachers College. Through her school’s connection to the college, Lukas worked with many other teachers and education professionals on joint projects, including co-teaching a seminar for people going into education. Lukas said that from this experience she saw, “that you can have an impact without just being in the classroom.”

Lukas and Felder knew each other before Lukas interviewed for the job of assistant principal at P.S. 40. When Lukas was working at P.S. 165, Felder worked at a school nearby. Felder worked with new teachers as a literary staff developer, so she would sometimes bring new teachers into Lukas’s kindergarten classroom to observe.

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Send-off fit for a prince-ipal

Epiphany’s James Hayes steps down after 38 years

Epiphany principal James Hayes was surprised by a flash mob of students, parents and alumni on Friday morning. He will remain with the school by heading its fundraising arm. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Epiphany principal James Hayes was surprised by a flash mob of students, parents and alumni on Friday morning. He will remain with the school by heading its fundraising arm. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On Friday, June 17, James Hayes, the principal of the Epiphany School for the past 38 years, had intended to treat his last day on the job like any other — by standing out front and greeting the students as they came in.

But this time, when he opened the door, there was a crowd of nearly 200 people outside — students, parents, alumni and neighbors. Before he was fully aware what was going on, the flash mob of fans then broke into song, belting out “I’d Do Anything” from the Broadway show “Oliver.”

They ended with, “We’d do anything for you, Jim, anything. For you mean everything to us.”

According to a parent, assembling the surprise serenade was necessary if the school wanted to give him any kind of sendoff, since he hadn’t wanted a party.

Nonetheless, Hayes seemed to appreciate the gesture, as students and alumni from decades ago lined up for photos with him in front of the school building on East 22nd Street.

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Town & Village School welcomes new principal

New principal Nina Loftspring (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

New principal Nina Loftspring (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Town & Village Synagogue welcomed a new face to their Hebrew School at the beginning of the summer. Nina Loftspring joined the staff as the principal in July and said she’s been busy since then preparing for the beginning of the school year on September 8.

She’s confident that she’ll be able to do everything she needs to but “You always want more time to get everything ready,” she said. “I always want to start preparing in February!”

It wasn’t by chance that Loftspring ended up at Town & Village. Although she has since moved out of the area, she is a former resident of Stuy Town and appreciates that the synagogue is a small, tight-knit community.

“The kids aren’t just a number or a face in the crowd,” she said. “(Town & Village) knows their families and their commitment is seen through everything they do. It’s a very authentic community.”

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Students’ art on the table at Union Square Park

The exhibit was organized by Learning through an Expanded Arts Program (LeAp) and the Department of Parks and Recreation. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

The exhibit was organized by Learning through an Expanded Arts Program (LeAp) and the Department of Parks and Recreation. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Public school students from throughout the city gathered in Union Square Park on a rainy Tuesday morning on May 19 to present colorfully decorated lunchroom tables that addressed major social issues in their communities and the world.

The students from 10 city schools worked with various artists in their studios to create the painted tables through an initiative made possible by Learning through an Expanded Arts Program (LeAp) and the Department of Parks and Recreation. The tables will be on display throughout the five boroughs near the schools where they were created from June through the end of August.

The presentation in Union Square was the only time that all the tables were in one place.

In previous years, students have covered issues like bullying, racism, gay rights and drug addiction but have also addressed issues specifically relevant to the time, such as Hurricane Sandy. This year, students examined issues similar to those in previous years, as well as more current issues like gun violence and police brutality.

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Baruch Campus High School students design gadget that vacuums subway

The Baruch InvenTeam with their prototype (left to right) Ivan Chang, Carmen Li, Kevin Zhang, Long Wang Lin, Wendy Ni, Xiao Hui Zheng, Conan Lin, Sherry Ou Yang, William Chung and Queena Chiu (behind the prototype, left to right) Elton Zhang and Tony Long (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

The Baruch InvenTeam with their prototype (left to right) Ivan Chang, Carmen Li, Kevin Zhang, Long Wang Lin, Wendy Ni, Xiao Hui Zheng, Conan Lin, Sherry Ou Yang, William Chung and Queena Chiu (behind the prototype, left to right) Elton Zhang and Tony Long (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

A group of college-bound seniors at Baruch College Campus High School will soon be heading to MIT to present a detachable rubbish vacuum that they designed and built for use in the subways.

What they came up with is an alternative that they hope the MTA will use to keep the subway tracks clear. The agency currently has entire work trains dedicated to vacuuming up garbage on the tracks, but the prototype that the students have created would instead attach onto the MTA’s existing work trains and, they say, would require less maintenance.

To create the prototype that they primarily worked on in the cramped back section of a classroom, they used motors and filters from actual vacuums, but added on features to make it semi-automatic. The device, which was built on a smaller scale than the real thing to cut down on expenses, has light sensors on the top so it kicks on when it pulls into the station and turns off when back inside the tunnel to conserve energy. Their version operated while plugged into the wall, but in practice the vacuum would draw energy from the third rail, which would also make it more powerful.

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Man tries to lure girl at school fair

By Sabina Mollot
A man attempted to lure a girl at a street fair that was held by the Jack and Jill School two Saturdays ago, Town & Village has learned.

According to a spokesperson for the NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Public Information, an unknown man approached a six-year-old girl at the event, and asked where her dad was. He then told her she should go with him because he was her uncle, police said.

The school event was held on a public street.

The school event was held on a public street.

Mary Carroll French, the director at the school, told Town & Village that while she wasn’t a witness to the incident, she heard after the fact how a man had approached a former student who was at the event and spoke to her.

“It was what the NYPD would call attempted luring,” said Carroll French. But, she added, the girl didn’t respond to him. Additionally, the girl’s father was nearby as was another father and a sexton at the school.

“The sexton had his eye on him and was watching him,” she said. The sexton, then realizing the man was a stranger, shooed the man away and he left with his bike, although Carroll French said she didn’t know if he was riding it.

She noted that since the fair was held on a public street, East 16th Street between Rutherford Place and Third Avenue, anyone could walk through. The event was held from noon to 4 p.m. and Carroll French said she believed the man strode through later in the event. She added that parents at the school, which is for kids ages 2-5, have been alerted.

Police described the man as being black or Hispanic, approximately 6 ft. 1 in. and has curly or wavy hair.

The man’s actions were also mentioned in an email blast to neighbors from the Gramercy Park Block Association this past Tuesday. The email quotes a brief letter sent to parents from another local school that referred to the incident as an attempted kidnapping.

Last weekend, when another local school had a street fair, a couple of police officers were stationed nearby and this time there were no incidents, police said.

Third Street Music School to celebrate 120th anniversary with $5.3M face-lift

A rendering shows Third Street Music School after a two-year project that will include work to make the building’s facade more attractive, as well as making the building more modern inside with a state-of-the-art auditorium and a recording studio.

A rendering shows Third Street Music School after a two-year project that will include work to make the building’s facade more attractive, as well as making the building more modern inside with a state-of-the-art auditorium and a recording studio.

By Sabina Mollot

The Third Street Music School Settlement, which has been in the midst of a busy year celebrating its 120th anniversary, now has another thing to celebrate — a $5.3 million renovation. The project, which is scheduled to begin this summer, will include a state-of-the-art auditorium, a newly built ensemble practice and performance space and an adjoining recording studio.

The plan, which is already 80 percent funded, will also include an expansion to the school’s lobby and an additional staircase which will also serve to make the front of the building, currently marred by fire escapes, more attractive with some glass paneling, allowing those on the street a view inside. There will also be a new elevator installed.

“We’ve reached a point where we needed more space,” said Valerie Lewis, the school’s executive director, during a recent conversation at her office. “The demand for our programs continues to grow.”

At this time, there are close to 4,000 students at Third Street, with 1,700 of them enrolled in onsite programs. The rest learn at offsite locations around the city through partnerships with 25 other schools.

However, the school has needed upgrades at its building, located on East 11th Street between Second and Third Avenues, for a while. Originally part of the St. Mark’s Hospital complex, where nurses were housed, the building has two dates on its cornerstone, 1890 and 1926. Its current elevator is the original one, and is a “traction” elevator, meaning it uses steel rope, and is considered a freight elevator that can carry up to 3,000 lbs. The plan to renovate came out of a number of needs voiced by students and their families, in particular the recording studio, which will be located in the building’s sub-basement. Lewis noted how it’s become increasingly common for conservatories and competitive high schools – and even competitive middle and elementary schools — to require students to provide a high quality recording as part of an audition process. In addition to being able to provide that service onsite, Lewis noted that the studio will also be helpful in teaching students about subjects like sound engineering and re-mastering. She’s also mulling the possibility of putting out a Third Street album of music.

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Brotherhood book drive will benefit public schools

Teachers pick out books for their schools on March 7 after a book drive was conducted at Brotherhood Synagogue and other locations. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Teachers pick out books for their schools on March 7 after a book drive was conducted at Brotherhood Synagogue and other locations. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Brotherhood Synagogue, which regularly organizes its congregants in various charitable efforts, has most recently concluded a book drive with Project Cicero, an annual non-profit project that provides reading material to under-resourced public schools.

Lynn Abraham, a member of Brotherhood Synagogue and a board member for Project Cicero, said that as of last week, the synagogue managed to collect 12 boxes of books throughout the past month. By the end of the donation period last Sunday, the total was 17 boxes.

“That’s extraordinary for a synagogue,” she said.

The donation efforts for Project Cicero at the synagogue have been spearheaded by the synagogue’s Social Action Committee member Linda Yee Kaleko, who said that Brotherhood has been involved with the organization for about six years.

“My daughter happened to really love reading and books when she was in high school,” Kaleko said. “Sometimes in the committee we try to come up with new projects and this came up when we were looking for something so it worked out very well.”

Abraham said that since Project Cicero has started in 2001, it has been able to put about three million books back into the public school system.

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David Axelrod, former Obama adviser and Stuy Town native, releases memoir

President Barack Obama (right) with David Axelrod (second to left) and others in the Oval Office (Photo by Pete Souza/ White House)

President Barack Obama (right) with David Axelrod (second to left) and others in the Oval Office (Photo by Pete Souza/ White House)

By Sabina Mollot

David Axelrod, the former senior adviser to President Barack Obama, who’d also helped strategize campaigns for him and a slew of other elected officials, and who worked as an adviser to President Bill Clinton, has recently written a book about his professional experiences. The Stuyvesant Town native, whose introduction to the world of politics began with a historic visit from then-Senator John F. Kennedy to the street where he lived, has called the memoir, Believer: My Forty Years in Politics ($35, Penguin). While in the midst of a multi-state media tour, Axelrod, now the director of the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago, discussed his book, his background and his career with Town & Village.

What was growing up in Stuyvesant Town like for you?

I grew up reading your newspaper. It was a great experience. It was a different kind of community than it is now. It was pretty modest. A lot of World War II veterans and families, and it was really an oasis in the city. We all got together in the playground. I’m still friends with a lot of people I grew up with. Some of them came to my book event in New York and some of them are coming to my event in Boston. Back then there was a real sense of community in Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper. The people you grew up with you stuck with from nursery to high school and ultimately through life. I have a great association with Stuyvesant Town and growing up there.

I was just there a week ago to film a piece for CBS about my book. We walked on 20th. My first address was 622 East 20th Street. We talked about the day in 1960 when JFK came and campaigned in Stuyvesant Town. I was noticing the change in the community, all the high end kind of stores and air conditioners in every window, because we didn’t have that back then. It looked like a very upgraded version of what I remember. When we lived at 622, my parents were mostly still married, but they did split up when I was eight. Then my mom and I moved to 15 Stuyvesant Oval. My mother was a writer and worked in advertising and my father was a psychologist. I had an older sister, Joan. At 622, it was a two-bedroom, so Joan and I shared a bedroom with a wooden divider.

As you know, Stuyvesant Town apartments are small, small kitchens, small bathrooms. By today’s standards, the apartments were very modest, but it seemed comfortable to me. My parents got divorced when I was 13 and my mom and I went to live at 15 Stuyvesant Oval. My sister was gone by then. My mom moved in 1948 and moved out in 2006 to an assisted living facility in Massachusetts. She died last year. (Axelrod’s father committed suicide in 1977.)

There was a lot of activity and my group was the Playground 10 group. There were parts of Stuyvesant Town that were predominantly Jewish and parts of Stuyvesant Town that were predominantly Catholic and parts that were predominantly Protestant, and the playgrounds roughly followed those ethnic divisions. Like Playground 9 was where the Catholic kids hung out. There were very few minorities back then.

I went to PS 40 and Junior High School 104 and Stuyvesant High School when it was still on 16th Street. In my day they were excellent public schools. I still have a teacher in my head who played a formative role in my life. It was at PS 40 and her name was Lee Roth. She brought poets to our classroom, well-known poets of the day, like Ogden Nash. In the classroom, she would engage us in discussions on current events. It really enriched my life and I feel a debt of gratitude to all the people like her.

JFK crowd at 1st ave

When JFK came to Stuyvesant Town in 1960, David Axelrod was in attendance. This photo, originally published in Town & Village, also appears in his book.

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New preschool opens at Gustavus Adolphus Church

Open Arms Director Misa Anderson in one of the new preschool’s classroom spaces (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Open Arms Director Misa Anderson in one of the new preschool’s classroom spaces (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel
With the number of young families on the rise in the city, Gustavus Adolphus Lutheran Church on East 22nd Street has opened its doors to Open Arms Preschool, a new ministry at the church, which is now accepting enrollment for a summer program for children 18 to 29 months.
The church previously had a senior center, which had offered programming for the last 40 years, but when the Stein Center opened on East 23rd Street in its new, permanent home, the administrators at Gustavus Adolphus saw less of a need for the services their center provided.
“The generation before us recognized that care for seniors was vital for the community and provided those services,” Pastor Chris Mietlowski said. “In the process of discerning the next step for our congregation, we noticed that families were not leaving the city and were instead staying here to raise their families so there is a growing need for early child care.”
The program in the summer is a playgroup-type experience targeting a younger age group than the usual preschool age, so the children are there for only a couple of days a week and the parents can stay throughout the classes. “We’re creating a place where parents or caregivers have a gentle separation to get kids ready for a real preschool setting so parents don’t feel like they’re ripping the band-aid off,” said Open Arms director Misa Anderson, who has more than 20 years of preschool teaching experience. “We want to create a lifelong love of learning so we want kids to have a positive first school experience with things like story time and music.”

A classroom at Open Arms (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

A classroom at Open Arms (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

The only religion in the curriculum is based around the holidays like Christmas and Easter and there are some Christian-based decorations up like a Noah’s Ark hanging in one of the classrooms, but most of the class time is focused on playgroups and other non-religious activities.
Mietlowski said that the space that used to be allocated for the seniors has been converted to modern classroom spaces with brand new equipment and furnishings. The renovations included a smaller and bigger classroom, which hold about six and 10 students, respectively.
Open Arms is currently open for enrollment for the summer program, which runs six weeks from June 30 to August 8. Mietlowski said that the dates have flexibility, though, since families aren’t always around for the whole summer, and families can instead sign up for the program for three weeks of their choosing. Monday and Wednesday or Tuesday and Thursday schedule options are available.
He added that there’s also a plan for a program in the fall for slightly older children, ages two and three. The program will include enrichment classes such as cooking, music, yoga and sign language, which would be available to both the younger and older children.
Tuition for the full six weeks is $625 and for a three-week period, it’s $325.
The school is at 155 East 22nd Street and more information is available by contacting Anderson at openarmspreschool@gmail.com or (914) 806-3949.

East Village nursery school has sudden growth spurt

Sara Curry Preschool at Little Missionary’s Day Nursery Director Eileen Johnson, a Stuyvesant Town resident, says the school now has a mix of Lower East Side and Stuyvesant Town students. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Sara Curry Preschool at Little Missionary’s Day Nursery Director Eileen Johnson, a Stuyvesant Town resident, says the school now has a mix of Lower East Side and Stuyvesant Town students. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot
Even before Mayor de Blasio announced a plan that would more than double the amount of pre-K seats throughout the city, a local nonprofit nursery school was working on its own goal of doubling in size to meet the needs of a neighborhood teeming with families.
That school was Sara Curry Preschool at Little Missionary’s Day Nursery, which is already prepping its St. Marks building to add more classroom space. By September, the school will be ready to accommodate a total of 100 kids, its director, Stuyvesant Town resident Eileen Johnson said.
During a recent stroll through the building, which is over a century old, Johnson discussed how the place has changed over the years.
At one point it was the working and living quarters of its founder, Sara Curry, also known as the little missionary, who, like a more recent tenant in the building, a Hare Krishna group, would serve soup to hungry East Siders. The Hare Krishnas have been gone for years though and tenants who replaced them, members of a graphic arts team, have also moved.
The school is the landlord, and taking the space back for more classrooms has been a goal for a while, but, said Johnson, it wasn’t financially possible until now.
“We couldn’t have been able to run the school without the rental income,” she said.
Part of the reason, explained Johnson, is that tuition at the school has always been kept under market with the rest of the needed cash coming from fundraising.

Eileen Johnson in her office (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Eileen Johnson in her office (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

So naturally, there’s also a fundraising effort going on now, with a total goal of $200,000. Some of that money — around $50,000 — has already been raised through a street fair, raffles and donors. An awards ceremony event will take place in May and there’s also currently an Indiegogo campaign to bring in an additional $20,000.
For this the school has gotten some support from actress and East Village resident Rachel Weisz, who narrated the Indiegogo video. Her son was a student until he aged out of the program. The campaign will continue through May 11 and as of T&V’s press time on Wednesday, has raised $7,651.
Once the money’s raised, there will be numerous improvements made to the building, which was opened as a school in 1896. One of the jobs is to put the offices on the fourth floor, since by law, buildings without elevators can’t have classroom space on the fourth floor. Staircase railings will have to be made more sturdy, a full fire alarm system will have to be installed, plumbing upgrades are needed and the classrooms will then need new paint and furniture. If possible, Johnson said she’d like to put a garden or some sort of recreational and learning space on the roof.
Additionally, along with making improvements to the building, some of the money raised will go towards tuition assistance. At Little Missionary’s, tuition costs $1,600 a month for the full five-day a week schedule. There are also after school and summer programs offered.
For the school, the move to double in size reflects how the surrounding neighborhood has changed. More families have moved in, but also, as the school noted in the Indiegogo campaign, more local tuition-based schools have been priced out. At one time, Sara Curry taught 200 students in the building, which has five floors, including the basement, which is also used for class and play space. After her death the school continued but by the 1990s, it fell into a state of disrepair and was in danger of closing. By 2001, the school had a mere eight students. But then the school underwent a restructuring and has seen its student body grow ever since.

The school building on St. Marks Place (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

The school building on St. Marks Place (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Initially it was just children from the Lower East Side, and they still make up the majority of students, but in recent years, there’s also been an influx of children from Stuyvesant Town and the East Village.
Then last year, St. Marks Place between First Avenue and Avenue A, where the school building is located, was co-named Sara Curry Way. Meanwhile, the school itself has gone through a couple of name changes. Johnson, who came aboard as director in 2004, explained, “We started out as Little Missionary, but then people thought it was a religious school. So I said why don’t we call it Sara Curry Preschool at Little Missionary?” The name, however, hasn’t really stuck. “Honestly everyone just calls it Little Missionary or Little Mish,” said Johnson. “It’s defaulting back.”
As for the nursery school’s resurgence, Johnson credits it to the curriculum, which includes dance, music, including use of instruments, art and cooking. “It’s not just some place you can stick your kids so you can go to work,” she said. “It’s really high quality programming.”

 

State English test blasted as unfair

Students, along with their parents, protest outside PS 40 on Friday morning, after taking tests that parents said had age inappropriate questions and didn’t reflect the school’s curriculum. Protests also took place at other schools. (Photo by Gabrielle Kahn-Chiossone)

Students, along with their parents, protest outside PS 40 on Friday morning, after taking tests that parents said had age inappropriate questions and didn’t reflect the school’s curriculum. Protests also took place at other schools. (Photo by Gabrielle Kahn-Chiossone)

By Sabina Mollot
Following the lead of a principal in Brooklyn, who held a protest outside her school over state English language tests that have been blasted as unfair, other schools have followed suit, with parents organizing similar protests on Friday morning.
At the heart of the matter, frustrated parents said, was that the recently issued tests had nothing to do with the Common Core curriculum students have been taught and had age inappropriate questions. Additionally, in some cases, a multiple choice question would have more than one answer that seemed like it could be correct. There’s also been a lack of transparency, test critics have charged, with no one allowed to see the tests after they’re taken. Yet another complaint was there was product placement in questions, with references to brands like Nike, Barbie and McDonald’s.
On Friday, parents and students at PS 40 participated at the protest, with the crowd stretched along the block on East 20th Street. Some of the kids carried signs that read: “Our kids deserve the best, we need to see the test.”
Council Member Dan Garodnick was also on hand, saying he too wanted the state Department of Education to make the test available to see. “It will help create a better test in the future and reduce the enormous stress on kids and teachers if they know what this is supposed to be like,” he said.
PS 40 PTA Co-President Kirstin Aadahl, who has a daughter in kindergarten at the school, said she hoped to see some change by the time her child is old enough to be taking the state tests. “I don’t want her to be studying for a test that’s meaningless,” said Aadahl. Last year the test had similar problems, she added. “PS 40 did well but many scores went down.” Then this year, teachers were told not to “discuss specifics” of the test.
Students take the tests in English language as well as math. The math tests are scheduled for April 30, May 1 and May 2. The tests don’t factor into students’ grades, but do have an impact on how teachers and schools are evaluated and also could help determine what middle or high schools a student is next placed in.
Another parent at PS 40, Linda Phillips, said she’s noticed that the teachers have been under pressure as well as students. “They’re being judged by this and we feel for them.”
Yet another parent, Deborah Koplovitz, slammed the test as being “a complete waste of energy” and said school funds should be spent elsewhere. “There should be more teachers, more paraprofessionals, more nutrition assistance for schools that make it better for children to learn,” said Koplovitz.
Still, parents at the school insisted it wasn’t testing they were against in general or the school’s curriculum, but simply this

Parents with Council Member Dan Garodnick (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Parents with Council Member Dan Garodnick (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

particular test, which was contracted to a firm called Pearson.
“The tests are not a good measurement of the skills or abilities of the students,” said Kara Krauze, another parent. “It’s harmful to subject students to testing that doesn’t represent their capacities.”
Another protest-site school was PS 59 on East 56th Street, which like PS 40 is in Education District 2.
That school’s principal, Adele Schroeter, had penned a letter along with another principal, Lisa Ripperger of PS 234, after tests were taken, urging other schools to participate in the protesting. In the letter she noted how few of her students opted out of the test this year, since administrators had felt confident that the test would be improved following other problems with the test given last year. But, she said, it wasn’t.
“Frankly,” said Schroeter, “many of us were disappointed by the design and quality of the tests and stood by helplessly while kids struggled to determine best answers, distorting much of what we taught them about effective reading skills and strategies and forgoing and deep comprehension for something quite different.” (See full letter here.)
A spokesperson for the state Department of Education did not respond to requests for comment on the protests.
While not done at every school, the protests may also be a sign that educators are no longer afraid of retaliation if they’re openly critical of an official policy. At least that’s the opinion of Shino Tanikawa, the president of Community Education Council District 2.
Referring to the principals’ widely circulated letter, she said, “I don’t think the two principals would have spoken out under Klein or Walcott but we now have a true educator as our chancellor.”
Tanikawa added that she was hoping “for a sea change.”