Squirrel scratches kid in ST

Management has tried to deal with the issue through signage, but the squirrels have continued their M.O. of approaching people anyway, and looking at you like this. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

Just when you thought it was safe to unwrap your Snickers bar in Stuyvesant Town, reports have surfaced of another child getting attacked by a squirrel. Last Thursday, in its weekly newsletter to residents, StuyTown Property Services stated that a child was scratched when a squirrel leapt out of a garbage can.

Because of this, management is asking residents not to feed the local wildlife anywhere on the property. SPS also not so subtly alluded to the fact that residents have been ignoring its rule about not feeding squirrels within 50 feet of the playgrounds specifically for children’s use.

Now, along with the signs, if a resident is spotted by a public safety officer feeding the critters near any of those five children’s playgrounds, he or she will be told to stop, a spokesperson for management told us. The rep added that the scratch received by the child wasn’t serious.

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Letters to the Editor, Sept. 14

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Appreciating NYC’s diverse history

Re: Recent coverage of statue controversy and T&V Politics & Tidbits columns

Dear Sirs:

I don’t just appreciate Steve Sanders’ columns in this newspaper, I’m often in awe of his clear, comprehensive essays. Those of the last two weeks were particularly compelling to me (Charlottesville and Normandy).

One side of my family is Dutch going back to the early 17th century. My uncle in this family was killed in the Battle of the Bulge (WWII).  I have his Purple Heart. We must be one of so very many American families who made a blood sacrifice to defeat Nazi power and ideology.

How could anyone condone marching along with the Nazi flag whether or not you are carrying it?  Is it so long since the end of WWII?

My grandparents gave this same uncle a middle name to honor their treasured neighbors. That middle name was Levy. I’m signing this with a 17C  spelling of my Dutch maiden name. Asser Levy was also here in the 17th century.

We don’t know if he was ancestor to my family’s neighbors….but maybe.

What we know is diversity started then at least in New Amsterdam.

Joyce Hooghtelingh Kent,
Gramercy Park

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Police Watch: Man breaks EMS worker’s nose, Person assaulted on L train

MAN BREAKS NOSE OF EMS WORKER AT BELLEVUE
Police arrested 27-year-old Jeremy Santiago for allegedly assaulting an EMS worker in front of Bellevue Hospital at 462 First Avenue last Monday at 4:02 a.m. Police said that Santiago acted uncooperative while an EMS worker was trying to get him inside an ambulance and he allegedly behaved erratically by running towards oncoming traffic. Police said that the EMS worker attempted to grab Santiago and pull him out of the road to prevent him from getting hit by a car and in the process he allegedly hit the worker in the face, causing a broken nose.

MAN ARRESTED FOR L TRAIN ASSAULT
Police arrested 24-year-old Curtis McIntosh for allegedly assaulting a fellow straphanger on the L train last Wednesday at 5:45 a.m. Police said that McIntosh punched a passenger in the back of the head on the L train as it was at Union Square/East 14th Street. The district attorney’s office said that McIntosh received a desk appearance ticket for the incident.

MAN ARRESTED FOR ASSAULT AT EAST 16TH AND FIRST
Fifty-year-old David Wilson was arrested for assault at the corner of East 16th Street and First Avenue last Saturday at 9:06 p.m. Witnesses told police that they heard a commotion outside and broken glass, and when they went to check, they saw that Wilson was allegedly on top of the victim, who had sustained a cut on the back of his head. When the victim struck the sidewalk, Wilson allegedly fled. Another witness said he had seen Wilson tackle the victim to the ground. Police searched the area and Wilson was arrested shortly after.

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Trump, Sanders voters unite to protest Clinton book signing

The former presidential candidate waves to fans while leaving her book signing at the Union Square Barnes & Noble, not far from the small protest. Behind her is longtime aide Huma Abedin. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Supporters of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders were out in very small but very vocal numbers to protest Hillary Clinton’s book signing at the Union Square Barnes and Noble on Tuesday.

Howard Caplan, a Trump voter who traveled from Philadelphia to protest the signing, said that he voted for Sanders in the Democratic primary and for President Obama in the previous two elections but “would’ve voted for a three-legged monkey” instead of Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.

“To write a book about why you lost takes a lot of hubris,” Caplan said. “She just keeps the anti-Trump contingent going.”

He also handed this reporter a pamphlet titled “Investigate #Pizzagate,” referring to a debunked report of Clinton running a child sex ring out of a pizza parlor.

Brooklyn native Ayton Eller said he was protesting the signing because he is a supporter of the president.

“I voted for Trump because he’s pro-Israel and pro-USA,” said Eller, who also addressed this reporter with shouts of “You lost, we won” before being asked any questions.

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Hoylman rescues injured bat

On Tuesday, State Senator Brad Hoylman met his battiest constituent yet.

By Sabina Mollot

On Primary Day, the scores of candidates on the ballot for citywide races briefly had their thunder stolen by an injured bat and its rescuer, State Senator Brad Hoylman.

Hoylman said he found the creature, which appeared to be in distress, near a tree pit on East 10th Street.

“I almost stepped on it,” confessed Hoylman, who’d been walking down the street with Bob Gormley, the chair of Community Board 2, at the time. But when looking down, “I saw this furry creature with wings. I’ve never seen anything like it so close.”

He could see it was still alive though, albeit struggling to right itself by flapping around. The copper-colored bat, Hoylman observed, had a wingspan of about seven inches, although the body was comparatively small. It also had, tiny razor sharp teeth, “so I made sure to stay away,” he added.

Concerned that the bat might expire under the hot sun, Hoylman and Gormley got a box from a nearby restaurant, gently scooped up the bat and put it inside. They then brought it to the Wild Bird Fund, which is headquartered on the Upper West Side.

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Powers and Rivera crush competition in primary

Unlike the sun, Council candidate Keith Powers was up bright and early, along with Council Member Dan Garodnick, to cast his vote in Peter Cooper Village. (Photo by Chris Carroll)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Peter Cooper Village resident Keith Powers and Lower East Side resident Carlina Rivera each won their respective primary races for City Council on Tuesday, following major endorsements for the candidates in the days leading up to voting.

With about 93 percent of the votes counted on Wednesday morning, Powers was declared the winner in the District 4 race with 41.24 percent of the vote and Rivera won the primary for District 2 by a wide margin, receiving 60.76 percent of the vote.

Powers’ closest competitor, Upper East Sider Marti Speranza, received 22.78 percent of the vote. None of the other seven candidates received more than 10 percent of the vote but Rachel Honig and Bessie Schachter came the closest, receiving 8.59 and 8.26 respectively. Vanessa Aronson received 6.68 percent and Maria Castro got 4.74 percent of the vote. Peter Cooper Village resident Barry Shapiro received 2.10 percent and Alec Hartman got 1.04 percent.

Kips Bay resident Mary Silver was Rivera’s closest competitor but still only received 16.41 percent of the vote. Former Obama staffer Ronnie Cho received 8.5 percent of the vote, community organizer Jasmin Sanchez got 5 percent and attorney Jorge Vasquez received 7.58 percent. East Village resident Erin Hussein technically dropped out of the race prior to the election but still received 1.9 percent of the vote.

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Man who fatally punched victim in Union Square for being white gets 25 years

Union Square (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On Tuesday, a black man who attacked three people in Union Square for being white, including one person who died as a result of his injuries, was sentenced to 25 years in a state prison.

The lengthy sentence for LaShawn Marten, 44, was in part due to the fact that the assaults were considered hate crimes.

He was found guilty on July 5, nearly four years after the incidents on September 4, 2013.

That afternoon, Marten, a regular chess player at Union Square Park, had stated he would “knock out” the next white person who passed him. Not long after this, a 62-year-old man, Jeffrey Babbitt, who was white, walked by, and Marten punched him in the face. Babbitt, who got knocked down to the ground from the blow, hit his head hard on the pavement.

Moments later, when a 19-year-old bystander (also white) tried to help Babbit, Marten punched him in the face as well. When a third Good Samaritan, a 47-year-old man tried to help, Marten hit him in the head so hard that he was knocked unconscious.

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ST-PCV tenants meet District 4 City Council candidates

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By Kristy Ye-Ling

On Saturday afternoon, crowds came out for a meet and greet in Stuyvesant Oval with nine City Council candidates hoping to replace Dan Garodnick next year.

The representatives at the event, which was organized by the Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village Tenants Association, were Rachel Honig (D), Jeffrey Mailman (D), Keith Powers (D), Bessie R. Schachter (D), Marti Speranza (D), Maria Castro (D), Barry Shapiro (D) and Vanessa Aronson. Republican Rebecca Harary, who’s an Orthodox Jew, couldn’t travel on the Sabbath but had a representative there.

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‘Taste’ returns on Sept. 16

Taste of Gramercy Neighborhood (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

Taste of Gramercy Neighborhood, an annual street food fair/fundraiser held by the Gramercy Neighborhood Associates, will be celebrating its fifth event on Saturday, September 16.

Around 20 restaurants from the neighborhood will be involved, offering tasting of signature dishes, under an open sky. The event, as always, takes place along one block, Irving Place between 17th and 18th Streets, from noon-4 p.m.

The money raised from the event goes to two local schools, School of the Future and PS 40.

Alan Krevis, president of GNA, said the event has grown each year in terms of how many tickets get sold, with mostly local people attending as well as some visiting from out of town.

“It’s grown tremendously,” said Krevis. “Last year we sold almost 400 tickets, so it is changing. We’re getting all the foodies. It’s becoming a destination.”

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Garodnick finally makes an endorsement for his Council seat

Keith Powers with Council Member Dan Garodnick (Photo via Dan Garodnick’s Twitter account)

A day before the primary, outgoing Council Member Dan Garodnick announced an endorsement for his Peter Cooper Village neighbor, Keith Powers, for his council seat.

“I am enthusiastically endorsing Keith Powers to continue my work in the City Council,” said Garodnick. “As a third generation East Sider, Keith will be a fighter to protect and expand affordable housing. He also has strong experience in government – working for State Senator Liz Krueger and Assembly Member Jonathan Bing, where we worked together to address school overcrowding, to assist small businesses affected by the Second Avenue Subway, and to prevent overdevelopment.”

Powers also recently received the endorsement of other local elected officials (Assembly Member Brian Kavanagh, State Senator Brad Hoylman and Comptroller Scott Stringer).

In response to Garodnick’s support, Powers said, “I’m honored to receive the endorsement of Council Member Dan Garodnick. For the past twelve years he’s been a champion for our community. I look forward to continuing his leadership in the district on good government, affordable housing, and public education.”

Council Member Dan Garodnick has served the 4th Council District since 2006. The 4th Council District includes Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village, Waterside Plaza, Tudor City, East Midtown, Midtown West and the Upper East Side.

Opinion: Tale of two cities

By former Assemblyman Steven Sanders

In 2012, New York City and Lower Manhattan in particular were swallowed up by Super Storm Sandy. The unprecedented rainfall left whole communities literally underwater for days and without electricity or steam heat for a week. The loss to local businesses was catastrophic. Repairs and renovations from the storm lasted for years. In fact, the work on the L subway line, which will cause some major disruptions, is directly related to the damage caused by the flooding of the subway tunnels. The costs soared into the tens of billions for the New York-New Jersey region.

Federal disaster assistance was applied for, which requires Congressional approval. Such financial help is common after devastating tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, droughts and other natural disasters. The response from Washington, DC is usually sympathetic, swift, and bi-partisan. That is until Texas Senator Ted Cruz got involved.

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Culinary couple opens cafe on East 14th St.

Björn and CJ Holm in front of Fat Cat Kitchen (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Officially opened in May by married chefs CJ and Björn Holm in a space formerly occupied by a palm reader, new café Fat Cat Kitchen on East 14th Street is looking to become a neighborhood mainstay.

“Even after being open for only a month, we already got a lot of repeat customers,” CJ said of the recent opening. “People who are trying our food are coming back.”

CJ said that she and her husband, who previously ran a catering company together, were actively looking for a space to open their restaurant.

“It’s a lot of work in the food industry, working so hard for someone else,” she said. “When you’re working that hard, you want to work for yourself.”

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District 4 candidates weigh in on issues affecting Stuyvesant Town

By Sabina Mollot

The Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village Tenants Association, who’ll be holding a meet-and-greet with candidates from the City Council District 4 race on September 9, have also quizzed the aforementioned candidates on a number of locally important issues.

Reaching out via a questionnaire, candidates were asked their thoughts on the needs of students amidst a current baby boom, the planned sanitation garage near Waterside and concerns specific to Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village as well as other issues.

The Tenants Association has published the results of their questionnaire online. Some of the candidates’ comments are below.

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Hussein drops out of District 2 Council race, endorses Vasquez

Erin Hussein

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

East Village resident and City Council candidate Erin Hussein ended her campaign to replace Councilmember Rosie Mendez in District 2 on Thursday. Hussein announced that she would be supporting Lower East Side resident Jorge Vasquez in the election.

She said that one of her primary reasons for withdrawing from the race and putting her support behind Vasquez is his background.

“I’ve lived here for a long time and got to know it even better during my campaign, but at the end of the day it makes the most sense to have the district represented by someone who is Latino, because he can speak to the unique issues from that part of the district,” she said. “The demographics are changing but that’s still true for the most part.”

Hussein added that she also felt Vasquez would fight for the issues important to the district, such as pushing for a public hearing on the Small Business Jobs Survival Act and advocating for rezoning around the proposed tech hub on East 14th Street to prevent out-of-context high-rises from popping up in the neighborhood, and was encouraged that Vasquez has not received donations from real estate developers.

“He gave me his word of honor that he would fight for a full hearing for the SBJSA and wasn’t going to vote in favor of the tech hub unless contextual rezoning was part of that, and his fundraising record doesn’t give me any reason not to believe him,” she said. “That made me feel very comfortable that I could take myself out of the equation and still win, in a way.”

Vasquez said that he was happy to receive Hussein’s endorsement.

“She has run a positive campaign about important issues in our neighborhoods, and I look forward to working with her moving forward,” Vasquez said. “I’ve been passionate about our community for my entire life, and I will use my energy, commitment, and experience to bring about real change.”

Letters to the editor, Sept. 7

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Time to show what we’re made of

When I moved to ST in the 70s, our council district then was more economically homogeneous. It included parts of the East Village, Chinatown, Lower East Side and Soho. Within this district STPCV was a Democratic powerhouse.  Not so today.

As incorporated in District 4, STPCV is still a substantial political prize but much diminished.  As District 4 cuts from 14th St. to 97th, most of its votes are outside of STPCV.  And north of 34th St, most people are co-op or condo owners.

While we in STPCV are still greatly concerned about protections for rent stabilization, north of 34th most folks are concerned about quality of life issues, property taxes and the affordability of maintenance.

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