Cop runs over Citi Bike while conducting traffic stop

An officer cut off a cyclist who allegedly ran a red light, colliding with the bike and getting its wheel stuck in the SUV. (Photo by Twitter user @Garvey_Rich)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Gothamist reported on July 8 that a police officer “forcefully stopped” a cyclist from allegedly running a red light near Tompkins Square Park and ultimately ran over the Citi Bike that he was riding on July 5. The incident occurred on Avenue A near the park last Friday evening, and a photo widely shared on Twitter shows an NYPD SVU parked over the bike lane with a Citi Bike stuck in one of its back wheels.

Police said that the cyclist was riding east on St. Mark’s Place when an officer saw him go through two red lights. The cyclist was reportedly wearing headphones and police said that he ignored sirens and orders to pull over, but the man who shared the photo on Twitter told Gothamist that he didn’t hear any sirens prior to the bike getting dragged under the SUV.

Witnesses told Gothamist that the officer cut off another car making a right turn from St. Mark’s and drove on the wrong side of the street before swerving in front of the cyclist.

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Letters to the editor, May 14

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

ST native’s book an exploration of virtues

David Brooks, conservative op-ed columnist for The Times, and a regular commentator on the PBS Newshour and Meet the Press, has just published: The Road to Character (Random House, 2015). Brooks spent his formative years in Stuyvesant Town. He remembers these years with warmth and appreciation.

In his most recent book he speaks about two aspects of our lives: “resume virtues” and “eulogy virtues” which can be quite antithetical. The former deals with our accomplishments: wealth, fame and status; the latter deals with our integrity, kindness and bravery and who we are.

The dichotomous relationship of our worldly accomplishments and eulogy virtues both exist, but Mr. Brooks believes that how one is remembered is more important.

This reminds me of two persons here: Mr. Bill Potter, the resident manager of both developments who was very kind to me during my most trying time and others who remember him when he worked here always say the most laudatory things about him.

And then there was MetLife CEO Robert Benmosche who began the decline of our developments from ideal and rare apartments for the middle class to faux luxury and pseudo-upscale units. Benmosche, who recently died, must have made billions of dollars but sans many significant “eulogy values.”

Mr. Potter’s life mainly was left others with memories of his sensitivity and many kindnesses while Mr. Benmosche is now remembered as having made lots of money and lacked the higher spiritual values. And much of his wealth was made from the destruction of PCV/ST.

David Chowes, PCV

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