Civic groups oppose city proposal for half of street fair vendors to be community-based

Carol Schachter, vice president of the 13th Precinct Community Council, pictured at right at a recent street fair that the Community Council sponsored, with a member, Pat Sallin, and its president, Frank Scala (Photo by Mary Mahoney)

Carol Schachter, vice president of the 13th Precinct Community Council, pictured at right at a recent street fair that the Community Council sponsored, with a member, Pat Sallin, and its president, Frank Scala (Photo by Mary Mahoney)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Community organizers are worried that proposed new rules requiring participation from local businesses in street festivals will affect their revenue because they feel there won’t be enough participation from neighborhood vendors.

The Mayor’s Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), which oversees the Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO), proposed new rules for street festivals, including a requirement that 50 percent of participating vendors have a business or local presence within the same community board as the festival, as well as a limit on how many are allowed per community board every year, decreasing the number from 18 to 10.

Carol Schachter, who’s the vice president of the 13th Precinct Community Council, said that a number of groups depend on revenue from local street fairs to fund programming for the neighborhood. Schachter attempted to provide testimony about the issue at the public hearing held last Thursday but noted that the hearing was held in a small room without enough space to accommodate all those who wanted to speak.

“Stuyvesant Park Neighborhood Association hosts events like tangos in the park. They rely on street fair revenue,” she said. “We don’t have money as community organizations to pay for these things otherwise. We need that money for National Night Out: the giveaways, ice cream truck, they all have to be paid for and it’s paid for by revenue from street fairs.”

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Two Gramercy dogs will say ‘I do’

Shorty (left) and Riley at the store where Shorty has become the official mascot (Photo courtesy of Cauz for Pawz)

Shorty (left) and Riley at the store where Shorty has become the official mascot (Photo courtesy of Cauz for Pawz)

By Sabina Mollot

The concept of a dog wedding is hardly anything new. Passionate pet owners who’ve gotten Fido hitched in fancy ceremonies have even include Grammy-winner John Legend as well as numerous owners who’ve reportedly spent six figures for lavish puptials. And there’s another thing that’s not new. Articles on the subject of canine coupling dripping with shameless — albeit admittedly clever — pooch puns ranging from “puppy love” to “muttrimony.”

So why, you may be asking, is Town & Village writing about it now? Because at Cauz for Pawz, a Gramercy thrift shop, a dog wedding will be taking place in September — and we’re all invited. The bride and groom are both seniors at 14 years old and rescues. The bride, Shorty, was adopted by the nonprofit shop’s director, Cathryn Duhigg, at an adoption event that was held at Cauz for Pawz. Due to Shorty’s being a bit on the barky side, “no one else wanted her,” said Duhigg. But Duhigg said she was able to get past the chihuaha terrier mix’s annoying habit. This was after realizing that as a result of Shorty’s having been given up by her last owner who she lived with for 13 years, and then being fostered for a while, “she was destroyed.” The formerly lonely Shorty has since become the East 23rd store’s mascot, working alongside her owner. She still barks a lot at just about everyone.

That is, until the day that Riley came along. Duhigg said she knew he was the one when Shorty met him and didn’t start yapping.

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