CB6 holds panel on preventing hate crime

Community Board 6 Housing, Homeless and Human Rights committee chair Carin van der Donk, Audacia Ray, Michael Cohen, Angela Fernandez, Council Member Mark Levine, Calee Prindle and Franck Joseph (Photo courtesy of Community Board 6)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Community Board 6 hosted a panel on the prevention of hate crimes at the end of last month, shortly before the de Blasio administration announced that the newly-formed Office of Hate Crime Prevention will be opening sooner than anticipated.

Councilmember Mark Levine, who represents Northern Manhattan and sponsored the legislation to open the office, announced on Tuesday that the office would be opening this summer. It was originally scheduled to open in November.

“The epidemic of hate crimes sweeping across the country is a national crisis,” Levine said. “We have an obligation to guarantee the safety and security of every community that calls New York home.”

At the forum held at Baruch College on May 20, Levine thanked CB6’s Housing, Homeless and Human Rights committee for writing a resolution in support of the legislation regarding hate crimes prevention and education, the first board in the city to do so. CB6 adopted the resolution supporting the bill at the full board meeting in March.

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City Council supports Hoylman’s TRUMP Act

City Councilmember Andrew Cohen with State Senator Brad Hoylman and Councilmember Mark Levine (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

On Thursday, State Senator Brad Hoylman announced the introduction of City Councilmember Andrew Cohen’s resolution urging the state legislature to pass Hoylman’s bill requiring presidential and vice presidential candidates to release their tax returns in order to appear on the ballot in New York. Cohen, whose district is in the Bronx, joined Hoylman on the steps of City Hall for the announcement, along with Councilmember Mark Levine, whose district is in northern Manhattan.

Hoylman noted that it isn’t a coincidence the legislation, known as the Tax Returns Uniformly Made Public (T.R.U.M.P.) Act, shares its name with the president, “but it did take a very long time to come up with it,” he admitted.

The senator argued that the legislation is important because President Trump broke a 40-year tradition in which presidential candidates make their sources of income and other financial information available to the public.

“Another reason it’s important is that presidents aren’t subject to conflict of interest laws,” Hoylman said. “What is he hiding? He could be getting money from Russian oligarchs. Voters need that information to vote intelligently.”

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