Sperm donations from ST trickle in

This mailing was sent last month to homes in three neighborhoods known for having large NYU student populations.

This mailing was sent last month to homes in three neighborhoods known for having large NYU student populations.

By Sabina Mollot

Two months ago, a midtown sperm bank raised some eyebrows in Stuyvesant Town when it sent out mailings to every apartment in the hope of recruiting NYU graduate and undergraduate donors.

“Go on spring break,” read postcards delivered to every apartment. “Pay for it by donating sperm.”

But despite all the controversy and some initial interest, the company, Manhattan Cryobank, isn’t exactly swimming in donations as a result.

Ty Kaliski, Cryobank CEO, said it had gotten applications from a “couple of handfuls” of young men in the community, but then not much in the way of followup. This will sometimes happen if a donor gets cold feet or just chooses not to follow through for other reasons.

“They sound great on paper, we contact them, but then we never hear from them,” said Kaliski. “We also contact them via phone.” As for the Stuy Town applicants, “Some of those guys were phenomenal. You can never tell if they’re geniuses, but there are extra-curricular activities. I wish we could get them through the door.”

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2015: A look back

A coyote (not the one pictured) was spotted in Stuyvesant Town in January.

A coyote (not the one pictured) was spotted in Stuyvesant Town in January.

By Sabina Mollot

Capped with yet another sale of Stuyvesant Town — this time with the highest price tag ever at $5.45 billion — 2015 was certainly an eventful year for the community.

Town & Village has taken a look back to find the top ten local events of the year.

1. The highly anticipated sale of course was a big one, with the deal being cheered as part of Mayor de Blasio’s campaign platform promise to preserve or build 200,000 units of affordable housing. The sale to new owners The Blackstone Group came as welcome news to many tenants due to its representatives’ willingness to listen to tenant concerns as well as a commitment to preserve 5,000 units of affordable housing. While for others — specifically, tenants in the other 6,200-plus units, the deal simply maintains the status quo of stabilized status with market rate tents. Blackstone has promised additional announcements early in the New Year, which hopefully will include a decision, made in cooperation with the city, of how people can get a lease to the affordable units as they become available.

2. Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village, while always known as a bird sanctuary and a habitat for the world’s most well-fed squirrels, also managed to attract the attention of a coyote. The young female coyote, named Stella by Parks reps who rescued her, had been found wandering around the Avenue C side of the property near the Con Ed plant. She was captured by police officers, and then later released by the Parks department into a wooded area in the Bronx.

A Parks official T&V interviewed about the incident said that coyote sightings in the city are becoming more common, and she expected that this trend would only continue. Just a couple of weeks prior to the Stuy Town sighting, another coyote was found in Riverside Park, and in 2011, another coyote had wandered into Tribeca.

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