Editorial: Rage against the Democratic machine

Assembly Member Brian Kavanagh, who recently announced his intention to run for a downtown State Senate seat, just got a big boost this week with the support of the Brooklyn Democratic Party and the Manhattan Party bosses, the mayor, the governor and other elected officials. This was all in lieu of a primary since State Senator Daniel Squadron’s sudden withdrawal from public office ensured there would be no opportunity for one.

Naturally, this process has been widely blasted as being a shady “backroom” deal, for giving too much power to party bosses and allowing Squadron to handpick a successor. We have to say; we couldn’t agree more. Such blatant cronyism reeks of Tammany politics. Along with cheating voters and Kavanagh’s opponent, District Leader Paul Newell, it has also got to sting a little to the dozens of candidates who just went through the grueling process of campaigning for open and vulnerable City Council seats.

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Letters to the Editor, Sept. 26

If it wasn’t broke…

The following is an open letter addressed to ST/PCV management regarding the renovation of the bike rooms.

I’m sorry but the bike storage changes in 250/240/405 are really unacceptable if you consider them finished, and now my three year old daughter has gotten hurt because we have two adult bikes standing in our living room, as we have had for more than a month longer than your posted notice suggested we should expect to.

You’ve replaced rails that allowed dozens and dozens of bicycles to be locked easily at the frame with one floor rack that has room for about seven bikes to be locked near the floor. These floor racks make it more difficult to lock any part of the bike, even just the wheel, to anything, and as you probably know, bikes locked at points other than on the frame are far easier to steal. This non-replacement of the decent, old, and capacious railings has carried on for more than two months since CW representative Brian Moriarty said that tenants “would be able to store them under the same conditions that they were previously stored.”

If you believe that the old rails allowed for problems to arise in how passable the open spaces of the bike rooms are, I would point out several things:

1. I didn’t ask, but I never saw any building staff having any problems passing through the open areas of the bike room even while carting large items.

2. It’s very obvious that replacement rails could be installed in such a way that even full of bikes they take up about half the space the old rails did.

3. Any difficulty at all in passing through the open areas of the bike room was created by two things:  First, the landlord’s own elimination of about 80 percent of floor capacity and about 50 percent of bike storage capacity several years ago when the private storage units were introduced, and second, the landlord’s indifference to how many bikes were stored. And of course now, that last problem is even less of an excuse, since you now require all bikes to be registered. I’ll note that trekking bikes to the Oval (during only certain limited hours) to be registered so that they’re allowed to be stored in the bike rooms is no small ordeal for anyone, much less for my family of four who owns four bicycles.

Please immediately re-install in our bike room rails that allow dozens more bikes to be easily locked by the frame.

Thank you,
David Dartley, ST

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Reminder: Tenants Association hosting mayoral forum tonight

May30 signThe major candidates for mayor have accepted the Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village Tenants Association’s invitation to be part of a forum on the evening of June 26th at Simon Baruch IS 104, East 20th between First and Second Avenues. The audience will have an opportunity to learn first hand the candidates’ positions on a variety of issues, not the least of which is the matter of affordable housing.
All of the major mayoral candidates were invited and those who confirmed were Sal Albanese, Adolfo Carrion, John Catsimitidis, Bill de Blasio, Joe Lhota, John Liu, Christine Quinn, Bill Thopmson and Anthony Weiner.
The four candidates for public advocate were also invited to the event. The public advocate candidates are: Cathy Guerrero, Letitia James, Reshma Saujani and Daniel Squadron.
The meeting will be held from 7-9 pm. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. Doors open at 6 p.m

Letters to the Editor, Jan. 3

Some downtown areas still need Sandy aid

The following is a letter from State Senator Daniel Squadron, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, Assembly Member Deborah Glick, Assembly Member Brian Kavanagh, Council Member Margaret Chin and Council Member Rosie Mendez to Robert Doar, Commissioner of the Human Resources Administration in mid-December.

We write regarding the federal government’s approval of the City’s request to bring the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (D-SNAP) to areas of New York City impacted by the storm.

The approval of D-SNAP for residents throughout the city means that more New Yorkers in more places will get food assistance they need in the wake of the storm. Many New York City families continue to struggle in Sandy’s aftermath and D-SNAP is one way to help them through this difficult time. We are particularly pleased that residents from the 10002 zip code are eligible for the program. However, we do have concerns about the accessibility and eligibility of the program for Manhattan residents.

Of the twelve full and partial zip codes approved for D-SNAP in New York City, only one, 10002, is in Manhattan. In Lower Manhattan a large area was devastated by the storm, crossing a number of zip codes with a high proportion of low-income, elderly and vulnerable constituents. We urge the inclusion of additional full and partial zip codes to allow more Manhattan residents impacted by the storm to apply.

Additionally, for such a large program that is complex to administer, just two application centers (in Staten Island and Brooklyn), however large, will deter many eligible New Yorkers from applying. If there were additional application centers closer to more affected zip codes, open for a significant amount of time, it would spread the volume of applicants, reduce pressure on the existing centers, particularly in Brooklyn, and make applications more realistic for those who need it. In light of this, we recommend establishing an application center in Lower Manhattan.

Therefore, we urge the inclusion of additional full and partial zip codes that would allow more New Yorkers in Lower Manhattan impacted by the storm to apply, the opening of additional application centers closer to more affected zip codes, and an extension of the December 18th deadline for applications so that the program is as inclusive as possible for New Yorkers in need. Continue reading