Residents concerned over recent squirrel deaths in Stuy Town

Deceased squirrel found in Stuy Town on Tuesday (Photo by Marilyn Pascarelli)

By Sabina Mollot

Several reported sightings over the past couple of weeks of dead and dying squirrels in Stuyvesant Town have had residents wondering what’s going on — since they clearly weren’t devoured by hawks.

One resident, Noam Freedman, said he saw a dying one near Playground 7, with his wife spotting another one behind 7 Oval. The one he saw was lying on the ground, its legs twitching.

“I’ve been here for 50 years and I’ve never seen a single dead squirrel,” said Freedman. “To see two in two days seemed strange.”

On November 15, Freedman noted the incidents on the Tenants Association’s Facebook page. This was followed by a few more residents commenting that they’d seen dead squirrels in different areas in the complex recently.

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The Soapbox: Stuy Town’s VIP guest (Very Important Predator)

A hawk roosts on a Stuy Town air conditioner in February. (Photo by Jenny Dembrow)

Town & Village is proud to present “The Soapbox,” a column featuring a different voice from the neighborhood in each one. All are welcome to submit columns on the topic of the author’s choice, preferably not longer than 650 words, to editor@townvillage.net.

By John Cappelletti

You won’t see this celebrity very often in New York. In fact, you might never see him. He’s like the eponymous character in “The Invisible Man.”

But he does make an appearance every once in a while, like last summer for instance when he flew in from L.A., D.C. or some other location so competitive they use initials. Here there’s no competition. Attention, attention must be paid to this celebrity when he chooses to grace our lives with a welcome visit. Everyone at the park at Stuyvesant Oval where I hang out stops whatever they’re doing and moves to get a glimpse of him.

Semi-naked young people on the grass totally absorbed in painting their firm, shapely bodies with sunshine suddenly leave their comfortable blankets and move under our marvelous shade trees for a better view. Even though many of these beautiful trees have been chopped down by the landlord’s landscape designer, those that escaped the axe provide refreshing shade and filter the city air for residents like myself and I’m grateful to them.

Old folks relaxing on the wood and iron benches that line the cinder paths cutting through the Oval stop complaining to each other and focus their limited eyesight on our elusive visitor here. Stuyvesant Town has been designated as the unofficial home of the black squirrel because there are so many of these furry friends of the residents who have had their population driven sky high from being fed all kinds of nuts, including expensive black walnuts.

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Letters to the Editor, Feb. 23

Before my neighbor flew the coop

"Cooper"

“Cooper”

Re: “Hawks ruling the roost in ST,” T&V, Feb. 16

I live in Kips Bay Court (29th Street between First and Second Avenues), not too far from Stuyvesant Town, so I read your article about your resident hawks with great interest.

Just exactly a year ago, a hawk took up residence on a lamppost outside my window, and stayed for several weeks.

He had a good spot to survey the area for “food” and must have been getting good meals because he kept coming back! Needless to say, during his residence there were no pigeons to be seen – they were scared away (except for one unfortunate pigeon I did see end up as dinner).

I named him Cooper because by researching websites I thought he might be a Cooper’s Hawk, but that was only a guess from the drawings on the sites.

I was very disappointed when he left for good. The pigeons eventually returned (not right away, it took them a while to be sure he wasn’t coming back) and everything outside my window has returned to normal, but I do miss seeing him there, so majestic and beautiful!

Audrey Goffin

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