Heat wave through the weekend

As temperatures increase in New York City throughout the week, NYC Emergency Management and the Health Department advise New Yorkers to prepare for the extreme heat. According to the latest National Weather Service forecast, temperatures and heat indices will increase this week, reaching dangerously high levels by the weekend.

To help New Yorkers beat the heat, New York City will open cooling centers throughout the five boroughs through Sunday, July 21. Cooling centers are air-conditioned facilities such as libraries, community centers, senior centers and NYCHA facilities that are open to the public during heat emergencies. To find a cooling center, including accessible facilities closest to you, call 311 (212-639-9675 for Video Relay Service, or TTY: 212-504-4115) or visit the NYC Cooling Center Finder at NYC.gov/beattheheat beginning 8 a.m. Wednesday.

StuyTown sent out a notice to residents with precautions on how to take precautions during the extremely hot weather:

  • Check on elderly neighbors and friends who do not have air conditioning
  • Drink plenty of fluids and stay out of direct sunlight
  • In the case of a heat-related or other medical emergencies, call 911 immediately

Continue reading

Advertisements

Even playgrounds with sprinklers nearly empty during scorcher

A few Stuy Town residents like Ryan, with son Tommy, braved the heat, heading out to the playground sprinklers to cool down. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

A few Stuy Town residents like Ryan, with son Tommy, braved the heat, heading out to the playground sprinklers to cool down. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Can it be too hot to play in the sprinklers during a heat wave?

Town & Village found that it might be, in a recent visit to the water parks in Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village in the midst of the oppressive heat on Monday.

Stuy Town residents Dennis Mulligan and Anne Marie, who were out sitting in the shade by the Oval on Monday afternoon, said they noticed a mysterious absence in the playgrounds that day.

“No one’s outside,” Mulligan said. “It’s too hot. Even the kids aren’t out.”

The National Weather Service recorded the highest temperature in Central Park as 94 degrees Fahrenheit around noon on Monday, but officials warned that the combination of the high heat and humidity made it feel like it was over 100, creating dangerous conditions, especially for seniors.

Most of the non-sprinklered playgrounds in Stuy Town were desolate when this reporter went by, and Oval staff members who were stationed at the basketball courts in Playground 11 said that even the parks with sprinklers that were usually packed with kids were almost empty that afternoon.

“The moms and nannies probably don’t want to take the kids out because then they just have to sit at the sprinklers, melting themselves,” one of the staff members theorized.

Continue reading