Trump, Sanders voters unite to protest Clinton book signing

The former presidential candidate waves to fans while leaving her book signing at the Union Square Barnes & Noble, not far from the small protest. Behind her is longtime aide Huma Abedin. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Supporters of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders were out in very small but very vocal numbers to protest Hillary Clinton’s book signing at the Union Square Barnes and Noble on Tuesday.

Howard Caplan, a Trump voter who traveled from Philadelphia to protest the signing, said that he voted for Sanders in the Democratic primary and for President Obama in the previous two elections but “would’ve voted for a three-legged monkey” instead of Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.

“To write a book about why you lost takes a lot of hubris,” Caplan said. “She just keeps the anti-Trump contingent going.”

He also handed this reporter a pamphlet titled “Investigate #Pizzagate,” referring to a debunked report of Clinton running a child sex ring out of a pizza parlor.

Brooklyn native Ayton Eller said he was protesting the signing because he is a supporter of the president.

“I voted for Trump because he’s pro-Israel and pro-USA,” said Eller, who also addressed this reporter with shouts of “You lost, we won” before being asked any questions.

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Opinion: How many more lies?

By former Assemblyman Steven Sanders

Not wanting to sound too melodramatic I still must ask the question: what more will it take for Donald Trump to say or do something that will cause him to forfeit the confidence of the American people as a stable and responsible leader of this nation? If lying and weird Twitter outbursts based on no facts were an impeachable offense then Vice President Mike Pence would be warming up in the bullpen to relieve this president.

Without recounting the dozens of insults, lies and provocations uttered by Mr. Trump during the campaign and before, it is instructive to remember some of what he has said since being sworn in as president less than two months ago.

He started by claiming that he won the election in an “historic landslide.” And then when corrected that the election was very close and that he actually was one of the very few presidents ever elected without having won the actual popular vote, he concocted a baseless assertion that there were millions of illegal votes cast for Hillary Clinton. He questioned the entire integrity of our political voting system, the underpinning of democracy.

There are no facts to support those allegations.

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Maloney’s tips for women candidates

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, pictured at center campaigning last June in Stuyvesant Town, said candidates need to be prepared for constant battle. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, pictured at center campaigning last June in Stuyvesant Town, said candidates need to be prepared for constant battle. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

With the presidential election still a recent memory and New York City races for mayor and the City Council now heating up, Town & Village turned to Carolyn Maloney, who’s represented Manhattan’s East Side in Congress for nearly a quarter century, for some advice for would-be elected officials.

Note: While this article was actually supposed to be a guide for women seeking office, all the tips that were shared by Maloney would work just as well for male candidates. For some background, prior to first getting elected in Washington in 1992, the Upper East Side Democrat served for 10 years as a member of the City Council.

Read on for her guide to success at the voting booth and upon getting elected, success as a lawmaker.

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Op-Ed: The Election 2016: The fight we had and the battles to come

nov24-garodnick-with-family

Council Member Dan Garodnick, his wife Zoe Segal-Reichlin, and their sons Asher and Devin on the campaign trail

 

By City Council Member Dan Garodnick

Like most New Yorkers, I was extremely disappointed in the outcome of the presidential election. Hillary Clinton won nearly 80 percent of the vote in Stuyvesant Town-Peter Cooper Village, and the nationwide popular vote by more than 2 million votes.  Despite this result, she won’t be occupying the Oval Office in January.  

I am further disturbed and outraged by the uptick in hate crimes and bias incidents that have been taking place across the United States and in our own backyard. A swastika was recently carved into a door in the apartment building our own State Senator, Brad Hoylman. Hate crimes against Muslims in New York City have doubled from 2015 to 2016. A terrifying, homophobic death threat was sent to an openly gay colleague of mine, Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer of Queens. This is shameful, unacceptable, and not the city I know.

It’s also not the country I saw as I campaigned for Hillary Clinton.

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Letters to the editor, Nov. 24

Bernie bashing is unsubstantiated

Re: Letter, “Hillary pilloried for not being perfect,” T&V, Nov. 10

I’ll never understand why people with strong opinions are not strong enough to sign their names to their letters.

For example, a “Name Withheld” writer confidently states: “I am proud to vote for Hillary Clinton who is intelligent, competent and completely qualified,” but is not proud enough of her views to sign her name. She states that Bernie Sanders “ran on a platform of grandiose ideas that he did not have a hope of getting through Congress.”

How does she know this? Did Bernie tell her, “Hey, Name Withheld, I know these ideas of mine don’t have a prayer for success, but when you run for public office, you gotta say something?” And did she tell Bernie he is “not qualified to head the Executive Office,” to which he replied, “Who is?” Although being a mayor or governor might offer some experience, I doubt that anything prepares one for being the president of the USA. What were Obama’s qualifications? Or W’s? Or (are you sitting down down?) Trump’s?

After trashing Bernie, Name Withheld defends Hillary by writing that voters “struggle to see a woman in office. They find reasons to attack her over not very much. Misogyny, unfortunately, is still alive and well.” But maybe it’s not Hillary’s gender that voters find troubling, but rather the appearance of years of dishonesty and corruption.

I can’t speak for others who find Hill and Bill so untrustworthy there’s not enough space in T&V to list their reasons, but I did vote for a woman. Her name rhymes with Hill. She heads The Green Party and because I want a third party, independent of the two giants in America, I voted for Jill Stein. Stein’s platform was almost identical to Bernie’s.

And maybe she lost like Bernie because she didn’t have a hope for success either.  But I do. We have the knowledge and the ability to clean up all the mess we have created in our society. We just need the will.

John Cappelletti, ST

Editor’s note: At Town & Village, we agree that signed letters have more credibility than anonymous ones. However, in this case, it was the editor’s mistake to sign the author’s letter as “Name withheld,” when in fact, she hadn’t made a request to remain anonymous. The author of the letter is Harriet Gottfried, a retired librarian living in Stuyvesant Town. We regret the error.

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Clinton voters are seeking solace at this Flatiron store

Fishs Eddy owner Julie Gaines stands by a wall dedicated to Hillary Clinton that’s covered in hundreds of write-in “votes” from customers. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Fishs Eddy owner Julie Gaines stands by a wall dedicated to Hillary Clinton that’s covered in hundreds of write-in “votes” from customers. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

In the days following Donald Trump’s stunning upset, some New Yorkers who voted for Hillary Clinton found themselves instinctively heading to a certain storefront in Flatiron. A place they went in search of comfort, with other likeminded individuals with whom they could commiserate. And they did so while raising mugs — empty ones — with Clinton’s own mug on the side.

That place is, after all, not a pub but a home goods shop, Fishs Eddy, which, in the months leading up to last week’s election, had resembled a playful shrine to the woman expected to become the next president.

By October, the store was stacked high with the Clinton mugs. Other mugs bore her husband’s portrait with the caption “First First Man 2016.” Donald Trump made an appearance too on the side of an espresso cup along with the caption “HUUUUGE!” (He also appeared on a drink tray with the caption “You’re welcome” and a top selling “I’m HUUUUGE” set of condoms.) Other options for mugs included Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and cups bearing portraits of numerous Republicans like Marc Rubio and Chris Christie. President Barack Obama’s birth certificate was printed out on trays, a hot item since the beginning of the “birther” movement.

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Subway therapy walls pop up on 14th St.

A wall of Post-it notes at the Union Square subway station followed a wall of Post-its put up at the14th Street station between  Sixth and Seventh Avenues. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

A wall of Post-it notes at the Union Square subway station followed a wall of Post-its put up at the14th Street station between Sixth and Seventh Avenues. (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

New Yorkers looking for an outlet to express their feelings need look no further than a local subway station.

Brooklyn-based artist Matthew “Levee” Chavez has been stationed in the underground tunnel along 14th Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues almost every day since the election, armed with Post-its and pens for commuters passing through.

Union Square station has also become home to a wall covered in the sticky notes, but Chavez said that he wasn’t directly involved in starting that.

“I feel responsible for the project and all the other ones that have popped up but I think people thought the original one was at Union Square and just went with it, bringing their own Post-its and pens,” he said.

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Letters to the Editor, Nov. 17

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Country’s debt level is risky business

Re: Letter, “Our country’s invisible problem (Part 2)”, T&V Oct. 20

To the Editor,

The number one issue in our country is the amount of our national debt, as candidate Robert Ardini has written in your paper. The current low interest rates have hidden this problem from the people.

Usually, when there is a major increase in the amount of the national debt, there is also a major increase in the total interest cost of that debt. This increased interest cost pushes other expenditures out the federal budget, which hurts our economy and our quality of life.

The latest data readily available (through 2014 on Wikipedia) shows how lower interest rates have enabled the Obama Administration to escape this usual penalty for issuing more debt. For fiscal 2007, our national debt was $9 trillion, and the interest cost of that debt was $430 billion. In the next seven years (through 2014), our national debt nearly doubled to $17.8 trillion. During this period of sharply rising debt, interest rates declined. The debt nearly doubled, but the interest cost only increased 0.2 percent (from $430 billion to $430.8 billion). This was possible, because the average interest cost of the national debt fell from 4.77 percent in 2007 to 2.42 percent in 2014.

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First female president of T&V Synagogue turns 100

Peter Cooper Village resident Florence Friedman (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Peter Cooper Village resident Florence Friedman (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Voters in New York need to provide a reason for voting absentee and Peter Cooper Village resident Florence Friedman had a good one: she turned 100 the day before the election.

When she was born in 1916, the actual day of the election that year when voters reelected Democratic incumbent Woodrow Wilson, women were still not allowed to vote. And although Friedman wasn’t able to make it to her polling place on Election Day because of limited mobility, she said she enthusiastically sent in her ballot ahead of the deadline because she wanted to make sure her vote was counted for Hillary Clinton.

She was saddened when she woke up on Wednesday and found that her choice had not won.

“I voted for Hillary and most of the people around me voted for Hillary but I’m disappointed in the outcome,” she said the day after the election. “But that’s the way the cookie crumbles. It’s what we’ll have to live with.”

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Letters to the Editor, Nov. 10

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Local candidates kept things classy

To the Editor,

Many thanks to our neighbor and former State Democratic Assemblyman Steve Sanders for reminding us that members of our community have independently crossed lines in the past to vote for and support a number of Republicans like Senator Roy Goodman, Congressman Bill Green and Councilman Eristoff. They were able to work with other bi-partisan legislators to get things done and avoid the national voting gridlock we’ve experienced these last four years.

Credit is well deserved for Frank Scala, a Republican who is a member of our Community Board 6 and the Stuyvesant Cove Park Association Board and active on the 13th Precinct Community Council.

Frank believes in the two party system and will defend his viewpoint but not engage in prolonged gridlock. Even the editorial staff of Town & Village doesn’t disparage either candidate, but can suggest to the reader “Does years of being elected reflect voters’ approval of performance or is it preferable to have term limits such as those persons we elect to the City Council?”

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Opinion: Down the rabbit hole

By former Assemblyman Steven Sanders

It all seems so upside down. At the end of the day everybody got it wrong. Not since Harry Truman defeated Thomas Dewey for the Presidency in 1948 did so many people botch it. The pundits were wrong, the pollsters were wrong, FBI Director James Comey was wrong, I was wrong, and even Donald Trump was wrong.

Virtually every poll had Hillary Clinton winning the presidency with a close but comfortable margin. The experts and pundits who opined that Trump could never survive the insults and reckless accusations he tossed about the campaign were very mistaken. James Comey who ten days before the election reopened the FBI email investigation proved to be in error.  And finally when Donald Trump himself complained for months on end that the system was “rigged” against him, to his delight that accusation was proven false. In fact, by last count, Mrs. Clinton maintained a lead in the popular vote, while decisively losing in the Electoral College. One can only shudder at what Mr. Trump would have said had those results been reversed.

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Local voters come out for Clinton as Trump takes the White House

On Tuesday, a polling place at 360 First Avenue had a line spilling down the block. Many voters who spoke with T&V said they were supporting Hillary Clinton and local Democratic elected officials easily won reelection. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

On Tuesday, a polling place at 360 First Avenue had a line spilling down the block. Many voters who spoke with T&V said they were supporting Hillary Clinton and local Democratic elected officials easily won reelection. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Voter turnout was high at polling places throughout Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village in this historic presidential election, with some residents saying that crowds seemed to surpass even those from 2008. Although some sites throughout the city reported broken scanners, voters at the ST/PCV polling places T&V visited on Tuesday morning said that the worst problems they faced were long lines, and many said that it wasn’t a burden to wait.

“I feel like it’s my moral duty to vote,” said Peter Cooper Village resident Max Hague, noting that he cast his vote for Hillary Clinton. “I voted because I don’t want to live in a fascist country.”

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Soapbox: What’s a voter to do?

Town & Village is proud to present “The Soapbox,” a column featuring a different voice from the neighborhood in each one. All are welcome to submit columns on the topic of the author’s choice, preferably not longer than 650 words, to editor@townvillage.net.

By John Cappelletti

Last May in a letter to the editor I wondered why the Democrat establishment was backing the political dynasty by giving Hillary a 541-superdelegate head-start over Senator Sanders and putting the Democrat National Committee at her disposal and at his expense. The senator had a double digit lead over Trump whereas Hillary could only manage a tie with him.

Now a week before the election two of the most unlikeable, untrustworthy and unbelievable candidates of any U.S. presidential campaign ever, Hillary and Trump are still running neck and neck and many questions remain unanswered. Trump will not release his taxes and Hillary will not release her speeches to Wall Street. Is Trump the sexual predator Hillary’s husband was when she defended him against his accusers like Melania is defending Trump now? Will Weiner-gate hurt Hillary as voters wonder why emails pertinent to her FBI criminal investigation would end up on her top aide Huma Abedin’s husband’s computer? How did they get there? Furthermore, did her husband Anthony Weiner who’s been known to do stupid things for all to see online, read and/or divulge the contents of these emails? Who’s responsible for this poor judgment, Hillary, Huma or…? And what’s Trump hiding in his tax return or in his foundation? And what about the Clinton Foundation? Lots of cash from all kinds of sources goes into these two foundations. Are they laundries?

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Opinion: The choice in this year’s election

By former Assemblyman Steven Sanders

Historically presidential election campaigns pick up steam around the first day of autumn in the final weeks before Election Day. However this year’s race for the White House has been anything but predictable. There was an abundance of smoke and fire all summer, not to mention mudslinging. It has already become ugly.

It is near impossible to anticipate what will happen during these final six weeks or the outcome on November 8, other than only Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton can become the 45th President of the United States of America. In this crazy election cycle, with more twists and turns than a scary Stephen King novel, there is little to predict what will occur in the coming days, not after all the precedents and political traditions that have already been obliterated. This campaign is the most uncivil and abnormal that we have ever seen.

With all due respect to those who find both candidates unpalatable and plan to either sit out the voting or cast their ballot for a third party candidate, that is a cop out. It may make some feel better by not voting for either candidate, but it will not make the nation better. It ignores the reality of American politics and worse yet, it leaves it to others to decide America’s leadership future.No third party candidate has ever come close to winning the Presidency and that will surely not change this year.

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Maloney: Economy better under Dem presidents

Council Member Ben Kallos, State Senator Brad Hoylman, Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and Assembly Member Dan Quart

Council Member Ben Kallos, State Senator Brad Hoylman, Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and Assembly Member Dan Quart

By Sabina Mollot

On the heels of Republican criticisms of the economy and President Obama’s handling of it, Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and a few other elected officials responded with a press conference to argue that the economy has actually done better under Democratic presidents since World War II.

Maloney noted that since the Great Recession, unemployment has been halved from its worst point at 10 percent. Gross domestic product has also grown 1.6 times faster under Democrats on average, she said, with more job growth.

Maloney is a staunch supporter of Hillary Clinton and has served as a campaign trail surrogate.

However, she insisted the announcement, made at Columbus Circle on July 22 wasn’t in response to anything that was said by Donald Trump, who’d just told America during the Republican National Convention that he was the country’s voice.

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