Stuy Town gets new temporary bus stop shelter

The new shelter at the northeast corner of East 14th Street and Avenue B (Photo by Lawrence Scheyer)

By Sabina Mollot

On Saturday, a temporary bus stop shelter was installed on the northeast corner of East 14th Street and Avenue B as preliminary work continues along 14th Street for the looming L train reconstruction.

A rep for City Council Member Dan Garodnick told Town & Village the shelter’s installation is unusual for a couple of reasons. First, because the city had initially said that temporary shelters aren’t normally installed at stops that get relocated due to construction. However, Garodnick was able to convince the city to install this one as well as another at a different stop on Avenue A over the summer.

The new shelter is also unusual because it had to fit alongside the L train construction site and still have an Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant sidewalk.

“With winter rapidly approaching, it became even more important that Stuyvesant Town residents have shelters on 14th Street as they wait for the crosstown bus,” Garodnick told us in an email. “Just in time for the holidays, we have delivered this temporary shelter, which will serve the community during the ongoing L train construction.”

Stuy Town resident and Citi Bike rider Lawrence Scheyer noted that this corner was previously occupied by a very popular “valet” Citi Bike station. The bike share program announced in July that valet service was moving to East 13th Street.

At the Avenue B and 14th Street intersection, a new electrical substation and circuit breaker room are being constructed. Scheyer, who’s also a Community 6 board member, noted that this will allow MTA NYC Transit to run a couple of more trains per hour on the L line. This is being done in preparation for the repairs and shutdown of subway service from Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn to 8th Avenue in Manhattan commonly referred to as the “L-Pocalypse.”

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14th St. SBS route planned ahead of L shutdown

The MTA and the city are working on plans to enhance bus and ferry service, including Select Bus Service for 14th Street. Meanwhile, work will soon begin on the Avenue A entrance of the First Avenue subway station just west of Avenue A. (Corner pictured here opposite Stuyvesant Town) (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

The MTA has announced that preliminary street work on the new entrance for the L train at Avenue A and East 14th Street will begin this month. The new entrance is planned for the north and south sides of East 14th Street, just west of Avenue A.

Additionally, the MTA recently discussed plans for a new Select Bus Service (SBS) route along 14th Street to help make the looming L train shutdown less of a nightmare.

The plans for mitigation were discussed at the last Community Board 6 Transportation Committee meeting.

The shutdown, which is expected to begin in April 2019, will affect about 225,000 riders and cuts off train service between Brooklyn and Manhattan so the MTA can make repairs to the Canarsie Tunnel, which was badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

The MTA is working on plans with the Department of Transportation for a series of buses, road improvements and ferries.

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More buses promised during L train shutdown

For Stuyvesant Town and East Village residents, a bright spot of the looming L train shutdown is a new subway entrance on Avenue A, as pictured here in a newly released rendering.

For Stuyvesant Town and East Village residents, a bright spot of the looming L train shutdown is a new subway entrance on Avenue A, as pictured here in a newly released rendering.

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Residents affected by the imminent L train closure got a visit from New York City Transit officials last Wednesday in a meeting organized by Community Board 3 and 6, held at Mount Sinai Beth Israel.

At the meeting, NYC Transit reps promised a beefed up bus fleet around Stuyvesant Town to deal with the planned L train shutdown.

Agency Operations Planning Chief Peter Cafiero said, “If there is no service in Manhattan, then we need to build up the bus fleet. We could be implementing what I’m calling the M14 SBS. It would serve Stuyvesant Town more directly by looping up to East 20th Street.”

This was the second of what the agency has said would be a number of meetings to both get feedback and inform the community about the planned shutdown, which won’t start until 2019. The agency also said at this recent meeting that they will be hosting a meeting some time in the fall just for Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village residents.

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MTA explores options at meeting on L train repairs and shutdown

A public meeting on the planned L line repairs and accompanying shutdowns was held last Thursday at the Salvation Army Theatre.

A public meeting on the planned L line repairs and accompanying shutdowns was held last Thursday at the Salvation Army Theatre. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

L train riders got the chance to voice their opinions on the impending closure of the line during a meeting hosted by the MTA last Thursday, with straphangers divided on what would be less disruptive, a full closure or a partial one that takes twice as long while the agency conducts repairs.

Donna Evans, chief of staff for the MTA, said at the beginning of the meeting at the Salvation Army Theatre that there were two important facts to consider about the repairs: the tracks must be closed whether one at a time or together, and regardless of which plan is chosen, the closure won’t take place until 2019.

A two-track closure would be the shorter option at 18 months, but there would be no service between Bedford Avenue and Eighth Avenue with this plan. The MTA said that train service would be fairly regular in Brooklyn with trains running between Bedford Avenue and Rockaway Parkway every eight minutes.

During a three-year closure, the MTA said that service through the tunnel wouldn’t be frequent or reliable but in Brooklyn, service would be near normal with trains running every eight minutes. The MTA would be running extra trains on the G, J and M to supplement service in Brooklyn and the B39 over the bridge would provide an alternative for service into Manhattan. The L train would operate a shuttle between Eighth Avenue and Bedford Avenue at a 12 to 15-minute frequency and would not stop at Third Avenue. There would also be no service between Bedford Avenue and Lorimer Street, but service would operate between Lorimer Street and Rockaway Parkway.

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Cops arrest box-cutter attack suspect

Surveillance photos of box-sutter attack suspect

Surveillance photos of box-cutter attack suspect

By Sabina Mollot

Police have arrested a man they say used a box-cutter to slash two men across the face and punch and smack other victims, all in one morning on the street and on the subway.

Twenty-four-year-old Derrick Mcleod of 82 Macon Street, Brooklyn, has been charged with five counts of assault and four counts of criminal possession of a weapon.

Cops said the pattern began on Wednesday at around 1:10 a.m. when Mcleod allegedly punched another straphanger in the face on a northbound 4 train at Broadway/Lafayette.

Then at 1:18 a.m., he punched another random stranger in the face at the Bleecker stop. McLeod had a metal object in his hand at the time, the victim said, and as a result of the punch, he got a cut on his face.

At Union Square, McLeod fled the location where he allegedly slapped a 20-year-old woman on the right side of her face, causing her injury.

He then made his way up the stairs near the Food Emporium, where a 46-year-old man was standing by the elevator. He then asked the other man for $2, and when he refused, McLeod slashed him on the right side of his face, police said. Minutes later, McLeod crossed 14th Street where a 59-year-old man was waiting for the M14 bus. That man was then asked for a dollar, and when he refused, McLeod allegedly slashed on the right side of his face.

All victims were taken to Bellevue Hospital in stable condition.

Police said they found the box-cutter at a nearby location and that McLeod later admitted (in substance) to all the attacks except the slap.

His attorney, Karen Funk, declined to comment on the arrests.