Baby found unconscious at Madison Avenue shelter has died

MAve Hotel (Photo courtesy of Google Maps)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

A two-month-old boy living at the MAve Hotel homeless shelter at 62 Madison Avenue was pronounced dead on Friday, June 21 at 10:16 a.m. after a 911 call about an unconscious infant. When police arrived at the scene, officers found the infant unconscious and unresponsive. EMS responded to the scene and transported the baby to Bellevue Hospital, where he was pronounced deceased. 

Police said that the infant’s body did not have signs of trauma and there were no signs of foul play, so the NYPD will not be making any arrests in connection with the case. The medical examiner will determine the cause of death and the investigation is ongoing. 

The location where the baby was found was previously a hotel that was converted to a homeless shelter in 2016.

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Neighbors concerned about hotels used as shelters

Representatives from the Department of Homeless Services, the Human Resources Administration and non-profit organizations focusing on homelessness participated in the panel, which was facilitated by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer (far right). Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Representatives from the Department of Homeless Services, the Human Resources Administration and non-profit organizations focusing on homelessness participated in the panel, which was facilitated by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer (far right). (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Recently, the city has begun using hotels in Flatiron and NoMad as temporary homeless shelters, and the practice has area residents outraged.

New shelter neighbors gathered at the American Sign Language School last Tuesday evening to voice their concerns about the shelters as well as the homeless population in general.

A number of residents at the meeting insisted that they were empathetic to the homeless and acknowledged that it is a small percentage of the population that is causing problems, but many who spoke said that safety was a serious concern.

“The risk doesn’t come from the 70 percent of the homeless population who are working poor, who are just trying to get by,” Third Avenue resident Thandi Gordon-Stein said. “We’re worried about the other 30 percent who are convicted criminals and sex offenders. When you add so many facilities in one neighborhood, it becomes a danger. They say we should call 311 or the police but that’s not working.”

Many at the meeting said they were worried that the neighborhood could become oversaturated with homeless facilities. Matt Borden, Assistant Deputy Commissioner for the Department of Homeless Services, argued that the decision to use hotels in Flatiron and NoMad was based on the so-called “Fair Share Criteria,” which is supposed to prevent neighborhoods from getting saturated with shelters and making sure other areas are home to some. According to the data from DHS, which examines the homeless population within community district lines, Community Board 5 is under the city average of 1,016.

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