Permits filed for new tower at life sciences facility

ARE presented a 3D model of the new tower at a Community Board 6 meeting last fall. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Permits were filed last Friday for a 21-story building on East 30th Street between First Avenue and the FDR that will be the third stage of development for the Alexandria Center for Life Science campus that is just south of Bellevue Hospital.

New York Health + Hospitals filed the application because the hospital system leases the land to Alexandria Real Estate and filed the permits on behalf of their tenant.

The permits filed with the Department of Buildings on January 10 indicate that the proposed development is expected to be 384 feet tall and 587,137 square feet, with 417,734 allocated for commercial space.

A representative from the city’s Economic Development Corporation confirmed that the building will be the North Tower of the current Alexandria campus and although the application was filed for 500 East 30th Street, the building will most likely have an odd-numbered address on East 29th Street. EDC also noted that all of the commercial space will be wet-lab capable and there will be a small retail component on the ground level facing south.

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Bellevue gets 3D mammogram machine

3D mammogram machine (Photo courtesy of NYC Health + Hospitals)

By Sabina Mollot

With October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Bellevue Hospital has recently invested in new 3D mammogram imaging technology, which studies have shown leads to earlier detection of breast cancer. The hospital has also purchased new biopsy machines, which are needed to read the images from the mammography technology, known as Digital Breast Homesynthesis.

Dr. Hildegard Toth, section chief of breast imaging at Bellevue, said the new technology was a very important development in breast imaging as it reduces false positives, which in turn reduces the chances patients will be called back for follow-up visits. According to peer-reviewed papers that have looked at the technology as used in 13 centers, the number of patients being called back for followup appointments was reduced by 15 percent.

It also is able to detect early cases of cancer, which means in those cases, patients have more options for treatment.

“Generally, these are small cancers, less aggressive and would not have been found otherwise,” Toth said.

The way the imaging system works is that it’s able to produce a series of images of the breast, which can then be broken down and reconstructed to show breast tissue in multiple slice-like sections, not unlike a loaf of bread.

“It affords the ability to reduce the effects of tissue overlap, because sometimes you have breast tissue that is superimposed and you’ll be unable to distinguish an abnormality from something that’s benign,” Toth said.

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