Maloney opponent knocks other Dem off ballot

Congressional candidate Suraj Patel (second to left) has successfully sued two others who’d hoped to run in the primary against Carolyn Maloney, Sander Hicks and Peter Lindner. Both are now off the ballot although Lindner was already knocked off by the Board of Elections. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Sabina Mollot

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney will have only one challenger on the ballot during the June primary thanks to a lawsuit filed by one of her Democratic opponents, Suraj Patel, last month.

Patel had actually filed two lawsuits against two would-be candidates, Sander Hicks and Peter Lindner, alleging they didn’t have enough valid signatures on their petitions. As it turned out, the court agreed, with Judge Edgar G. Walker of the Kings Supreme Court in Brooklyn noting Hicks had only 1,140 valid signatures, which was 110 fewer than he needed. After the suit was filed last month, Hicks told Town & Village that he had gotten nearly 2,100 signatures and was confident this was more than enough.

Technically, the minimum for congressional candidates is only 1,250 but candidates know they have to get more if they expect to beat the inevitable challenges from opponents or their supporters. Signatures can be invalidated for a number of reasons, including if the person signing doesn’t live in the district or if that same person has previously signed another candidate’s petition.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Maloney opponent suing 2 other Dems

By Sabina Mollot

The congressional seat representing New York’s 12th District that’s been held by Carolyn Maloney for a quarter century now has truly proven to be the hot seat. In a June primary, she is facing two candidates: Suraj Patel, a former employee of the Obama administration who owns a dozen motels with his family and other partners, and Sander Hicks, a small business owner and former independent publisher. Then there’s Peter Lindner, a computer programmer who ran against Maloney in 2016 and was hoping to do so again.

However, on April 24, Patel filed lawsuits against Lindner and Hicks, which according to a spokesperson for Patel, is charging insufficient and invalid petitions.

In the case of Lindner, Patel’s rep, Lis Smith, added, “The Lindner campaign failed to file the required number of signatures to be on the ballot this June 26. Unfortunately, the Board of Elections won’t enforce its own rules unless another candidate demands it, which we have. We look forward to a spirited election where Democrats have a real choice for Congress for the first time in a decade.”

Continue reading

Maloney wins primary with nearly 90% of vote

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and State Senator Brad Hoylman talk to voters outside Stuyvesant Town. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and State Senator Brad Hoylman talk to voters outside Stuyvesant Town. (Photos by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On Tuesday, 23-year incumbent Carolyn Maloney easily won the Congressional Primary with over 89 percent of the vote.

Maloney’s Democratic opponent, Peter Lindner, got 9.55 percent of the vote or 1,435 votes with 1.32 percent of the voters, a total of 198, opting for write-in candidates. Maloney got exactly 89.13 or 13,389 votes.

The numbers came from the Board of Elections’ unofficial results made available from 99 percent of the scanners. In the 12th Congressional District, which includes much of Manhattan’s East Side and parts of Queens and Brooklyn, 15,022 registered Democrats came out to vote on what Maloney and poll workers Town & Village spoke with said seemed to be a typically low primary turnout.

Walking around Stuyvesant Town on Tuesday afternoon, T&V’s reporter only ran into people who said they’d be casting their vote for Maloney or wouldn’t say who they were voting for. One person though said he thought Lindner seemed promising.

Continue reading

Maloney talks homeland security, L train woes and the war on women

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney made a campaign stop in Stuyvesant Town on a recent afternoon. (Pictured) Maloney with ST-PCV Tenants Association Board Member Virginia Rosario (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney made a campaign stop in Stuyvesant Town on a recent afternoon. (Pictured) Maloney with former ST-PCV Tenants Association Board Member Virginia Rosario (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

On the Friday before last, Carolyn Maloney had the mother of all colds. Her voice unusually scratchy and her face makeup free, the congresswoman stood on the sidewalk outside of Stuyvesant Town, as a few supporters milled nearby holding banners with her name on it. They ignored the rain. There was after all, a primary around the corner.

On June 28, Maloney will be facing off against Democrat Peter Lindner, a Union Square resident and computer programmer. As T&V has previously reported, last month, Lindner tried to get Maloney kicked off the ballot due to a paperwork snafu. She then retaliated by arguing to the Board of Elections that Lindner didn’t even get half the required amount of signatures while petitioning. However, they were both unsuccessful at giving the other the boot.

But ballot challenges aside, like most Democratic incumbents in New York City, Maloney hasn’t had much difficulty in getting reelected. At this point, she’s been a member of Congress for 24 years.

Continue reading