Owner of Rosemary’s opening spot in Peter Cooper

Rosemary’s owner Carlos Suarez announced the new restaurant last week. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

The owner of popular West Village restaurant Rosemary’s will be opening a fifth location, this time on the East Side, taking over the space that was formerly occupied by Petite Abeille and Vamos! at the corner of First Avenue and East 20th Street. The new spot, which will include a space for private events, a vegetable garden just outside the restaurant, a sidewalk cafe and a dedicated space for takeout orders, is expected to open by next spring.

Carlos Suarez’s Casa Nela restaurant group owns Rosemary’s and until now, the most recent addition to their roster was Roey’s on Perry Street in the West Village in 2018, which originally opened as Rosemary’s Pizza, Eater reported at the time.

Suarez said during the announcement of the new restaurant on Tuesday night at Resident Services in Stuy Town that Rosemary’s was created with the intention of giving the neighborhood a space to feel comfortable.

“I named my restaurant Rosemary’s after my mother because I felt that the West Village needed a place to take care of the neighborhood, open all the time, offering a wide variety of delicious food that’s healthy and homemade, all at a reasonable price point,” he said. “I wanted to create the kind of place that would be welcoming to a diverse audience from students and young adults and seniors alike. So the name, the concept and the vision of the original Rosemary’s, and now Roey’s, my mom’s nickname, were all decided with the intention of making our West Village neighborhood a better place to live, to work and to visit.”

Continue reading

Powers concerned about Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town being marketed separately

Apr18 Leasing office 2 closeup

A new leasing office is under construction in Peter Cooper Village. (Photo by Thomas Rochford)

By Sabina Mollot

In response to the latest branding efforts by StuyTown Property Services, which have included new logos for Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village and a new leasing office now being built in Peter Cooper, some residents have been worried this was an attempt to treat the two complexes differently.

Council Member Keith Powers, who said he’d been hearing from neighbors on this issue, sent a letter to ST/PCV general manager Hayduk last Wednesday, asking him to clarify that the branding wouldn’t mean Stuy Town and Peter Cooper Village would no longer have access to the same amenities.

Powers also asked if apartments in both complexes would still be available through the lottery system for reduced rents. He also wanted to know if all the marketing would mean existing tenants should now expect diminished benefits and if management planned to reduce staff levels at either complex. Powers also had a question on apartment finishes, asking if Stuyvesant Town apartments would end up looking different from those in Peter Cooper.

“As a lifelong resident who has lived in both Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town, I am concerned that current plans are to put the two properties on a separate path in the short-term and long-term,” Powers wrote.

Continue reading

New leasing office for Peter Cooper Village under construction

A new leasing office is under construction in Peter Cooper Village. (Photos by Thomas Rochford)

By Sabina Mollot

Earlier this week, residents noticed that a new leasing office was being advertised in Peter Cooper Village in the corner space previously occupied by the Petite Abeille restaurant. The slick-looking posters show smiling individuals of various ages, and the property’s very new logo for Peter Cooper.

Asked about the advertisements, Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village general manager Rick Hayduk confirmed there is a new leasing office under construction just for Peter Cooper, but it will be housed in the neighboring 350 First Avenue. This is where another leasing office, primarily a center for brokers’ use, used to be until closing last year. The new leasing office was briefly mentioned in an e-blast to neighbors last week that also mentioned the Stuyvesant Town leasing office would be getting “a refresh,” as would signage and employee uniforms.

“Since our acquisition in late 2015, StuyTown Property Services’ and Beam Living’s focused attention has been on improving a resident’s experience (resident communication, situational response time, exterior aesthetics, quality of life issues, playgrounds, etc.), and we felt it was time to reset the ‘public’ image of the two communities,” Hayduk said in a written statement. Continue reading

Last Petite Abeille, in Peter Cooper Village, has closed

June18 petite abeille

The Petite Abeille in Peter Cooper Village opened in 2004.

By Sabina Mollot

Belgian restaurant Petite Abeille closed the last of its locations on Sunday night, which operated in Peter Cooper Village since 2004.

The owners announced the closure on the restaurant’s Facebook page on Friday, blaming rising operational costs. However, in recent years, Yves Jadot, who owned the restaurant with his brothers David and Christophe, said it was hard to operate a restaurant anywhere in the city unless it’s very cheap or very expensive. Last year, the original Petite Abeille, on West 17th Street in Chelsea, closed. In 2015, the Tribeca location closed with Jadot saying at the time there was too much competition from food trucks for the local lunch crowd. At one time there were four locations of Petite Abeille in Manhattan, the first one opening in 1995.

On Facebook, the owners said, “New York has undergone many changes in the 22 years we’ve been in business and unfortunately the rising cost of operating a neighborhood restaurant is one of them. As a small local business, we are simply not able to carry the hefty costs any longer in order for our business to be financially viable.”

Continue reading

Petite Abeille on the hunt for new logo

The Belgian restaurant is turning 20. The Peter Cooper location is now over 10. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

The Belgian restaurant is turning 20. The Peter Cooper location is now over 10. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

Petite Abeille, the Belgian restaurant well known for being family-friendly as well as its mouth-watering Croque Monsieurs, will soon be turning 20.

Yves Jadot, who owns the restaurant’s two locations (one in Peter Cooper Village, the other in Chelsea) with his brothers Christophe and David, said the company is going to be celebrating the landmark in part with a contest to design a new logo for the restaurant. Currently, it’s an image of a cute, smiling bee, since the meaning of Petite Abeille is “little bee.”

“What we’re saying is she’s all grown up,” explained Jadot. “She’s going to be 20 on July 19. She needs a facelift because she’s not a little girl anymore. The logo is a bit childish so we’re trying to make it more mature.”

July 19 is also when the restaurant in Peter Cooper will be holding its annual Belgian Day celebration, which usually includes a Miss Belgium pageant.
As for the art contest the company plans to hold, the winner will get a $1,000 cash prize as well as a life time of free brunch. Details on how to enter will soon be on the restaurant’s website.

Continue reading

Garodnick bill would end commercial rent tax for some Manhattan storefronts

Petite Abeille co-owner Yves Jadot (pictured in 2011) said the tax break, if passed, would help at a larger restaurant he owns in midtown. Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Petite Abeille co-owner Yves Jadot (pictured in 2011) said the tax break, if passed, would help at a larger restaurant he owns in midtown. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

In an effort to help Manhattan’s mom-and-pop shops, Council Members Dan Garodnick and Helen Rosenthal have introduced legislation to relieve many small businesses of their commercial rent tax.

Since 1963, any business in Manhattan below 96th Street paying over $250,000 a year in rent (or nearly $21,000 a month) has been made to pay the tax, which is a 3.9 percent surcharge on the rent. The legislation, introduced last Wednesday, would make the tax applicable only to businesses paying $500,000 or more. To make up for the loss in city revenue, businesses paying over $3 million would get a small increase. That increase would rise slowly as businesses pay more in rent, but at its highest would be an additional one third of one percent on businesses paying over $4 million.

While the mayor has not made his point of view known on the bill, Garodnick said his colleagues in the Council have been fully in support of it with the entire Manhattan delegation having signed on as co-sponsors.

“This bill is motivated by a desire to cut a break to small businesses who are getting hit in every direction,” said Garodnick. “This is a way to grant them some relief.”

He noted that while business owners haven’t told him that the taxes alone are killing them, the cost, he said, adds up for small retailers and restaurants, who’ve faced the citywide problem of getting booted out in favor of banks and other chains.

Continue reading

Three people have attempted to pay with fake hundreds at City Wings Café

Oct2 City WingsBy Sabina Mollot

City Wings Café, a new restaurant across from Peter Cooper Village, has a message for customers who’ve been attempting to pay for their food with counterfeit bills:

The fake buck stops here.

Will Hsu, the manager at City Wings, said that at least three different people (two men and one woman) have come in for the past three Sunday afternoons trying to pass off fake Benjamins as the real deal when purchasing small items like sodas. The phony customers have come in at especially busy times but still got caught since Hsu has to personally approve purchases made with large bills.

What’s caught his attention is that these bills look completely legit, passing the ink pen test. However, they flunk the smell test when the security line, a strip down the middle of new bills that’s supposed to be strong, has ripped easily each time.

When Hsu confronted the fraudsters, “they play dumb. ‘Oh, I’ll be back with another bill.’ They’re not coming back.”

And since the M.O. has remained completely the same, he believes the incidents are connected with a group of people involved. Hsu doesn’t remember much about how the suspects look, other than they are in their late 20s or early 30s, black and “very clean, legit, regular people. They order something small, like two sodas, something under five dollars.”

On Tuesday, Hsu put up a sign on City Wings’ door, warning would-be fraudsters that the next time a bill is suspected of being fake, police will be called. He also said it’s a heads-up for the other restaurants in the neighborhood.

Yves Jadot, one of the owners of the restaurants Petite Abeille and Vamos, which are across the street from City Wings on First Avenue, said he was not aware of anyone coming in recently attempting to pay with fake hundreds. Rather, it’s simply a problem his restaurants deal with from time to time. More often people will attempt to pay with fake twenties since it’s known employees check the hundreds.

“When someone buys a coffee with a hundred it’s a red flag,” said Jadot.