Opinion: We will not lose the war on women

By Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney

In the nearly half a century since the Supreme Court affirmed in the historic Roe v. Wade decision that a woman’s right to an abortion was protected by the Constitution, we have seen countless attempts by abortion opponents to strip millions of women of this right. But this year has been especially shocking.

Since January, more than 300 anti-choice, anti-women bills have been introduced across the country. In numerous recent cases, states have passed legislation that would effectively be statewide abortion bans.

This is a war on women. And we will not go back.

One by one, these draconian laws are being struck down in the courts. But the threats to women’s healthcare persist. The legislators spearheading this legislative strategy are aiming to control women. They want to take away women’s right to make decisions about our own bodies. They want to shame women who make choices they don’t agree with or even imprison them and their doctors.

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Maloney’s tips for women candidates

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, pictured at center campaigning last June in Stuyvesant Town, said candidates need to be prepared for constant battle. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, pictured at center campaigning last June in Stuyvesant Town, said candidates need to be prepared for constant battle. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

With the presidential election still a recent memory and New York City races for mayor and the City Council now heating up, Town & Village turned to Carolyn Maloney, who’s represented Manhattan’s East Side in Congress for nearly a quarter century, for some advice for would-be elected officials.

Note: While this article was actually supposed to be a guide for women seeking office, all the tips that were shared by Maloney would work just as well for male candidates. For some background, prior to first getting elected in Washington in 1992, the Upper East Side Democrat served for 10 years as a member of the City Council.

Read on for her guide to success at the voting booth and upon getting elected, success as a lawmaker.

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