Letters to the editor, Feb. 21

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

So this was my evening

To the Town & Village Editor:

A few weeks ago I got off the LIRR at Penn Station near 11 p.m. I took the 1 downtown, knowing I could walk underground to 6th Avenue should the L have already been shut down. At 6th Avenue the platform was full, 60 to 100 people.

An automated announcement repeated itself: “The next L to Canarsie will be at 11:20 p.m.”

I then saw three people spot a sign taped to a poll that I hadn’t seen. They walked away as if to leave. I heard the announcement again, looked at the time and saw it was 11:40 p.m. That was when the MTA guys closing the station, cordoning off the platforms with yellow tape, first came around to alert us directly. But indeed that sign clearly said, last train 10:30 p.m.

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Street co-named in honor of MS 104 teacher

(Pictured L-R) Will Weder, Suzanne Jacobson, Greg Lambert, Michelle D. Winfield, Louise Dankberg (District Leader), Laura F. Koestler, State Senator Brad Hoylman (at the event but not spictured) Pat Levenson, Angie Perkins and Claude L. Winfield, son-in-law. (Photo by Patrick Julien)

By Michelle D. Winfield

On Sunday, September 17, members from the Samuel J. Tilden Democratic Club and other community residents gathered at the northwest corner of West 71st Street and Columbus Avenue to unveil a street sign co-named for the late MS 104/Simon Baruch Middle School teacher Ponsie B. Hillman. New York State Justice Robert R. Reed moderated the program inside the Hargrave Senior Center. Students from the National Dance Institute, members of the Celebration Team, danced to the theme “Spanish Harlem.”

Hillman was a mathematics teacher at Simon Baruch for 10 years. She died in 2008. Hillman was being honored for her work in the civil rights movement as an educator and labor leader at the United Federation of Teachers and the NYC Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO. At the ceremony, letters were received by former Mayor David N. Dinkins, Mayor Bill de Blasio, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and former President Barack Obama. Congress Member Jerry Nadler prepared extension remarks in honor of Hillman.

The great-granddaughter of Hillman, Sophie Amara Ponsie, helped unveil the street sign, Mrs. Ponsie B. Hillman Way.

Michelle D. Winfield is the State Committeewoman from the 74th Assembly District and the daughter of Ponsie B. Hillman.

Letters to the editor, July 27

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Why I welcome new homeless shelter

Re: “Neighbors demand answers on planned E. 17th St. shelter,” T&V, July 27

I welcome any facility and program that helps the homeless. I welcome the day that there is a home for every person. And was also happy to learn that the topic of housing our local homeless was raised at the BRC community meeting.

We have Gene living on 14th Street and First Avenue on and off for the past two years.  And John who lives in a wheelchair on First Avenue for more years than that. Several homeless who reside on 15th Street by the Con Ed building and many more neighborhood regulars panhandling in front of our local banks and stores. Homelessness affects the person that is struggling with their life and it also affects every one of us who pass them on the street while shopping or enjoying our neighborhood. It’s sad and upsetting and lessens the daily experience of our community and our city.

Therefore I strongly encourage BRC to welcome in the homeless that inhabit this area. It makes it a win-win.

With blessings,

Susan Turchin, ST  Continue reading

Letters to the Editor, Oct. 20

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Impeding street fairs will hurt New York

The following is an open letter to Michael Paul Carey, executive director, Office of Citywide Event Coordination & Management at the Office of the Mayor, from the president of the Tilden Democratic Club.

Dear Mr. Carey,

I write to you on behalf of the Samuel J. Tilden Democratic Club and other concerned citizens of New York City concerning the proposed changes in the street fair rules. It is our view that these proposed changes will only serve to restrict New Yorkers’ access to all of the many benefits the street fairs provide.

The Samuel J. Tilden Democratic Club has taken a booth at the Third Avenue Fair for over 25 years. As a result of our participation, we raised approximately $300,000, which was donated to very worthy community groups which included senior programs, libraries, shelter programs, homeless programs, hospital clothing rooms, art and literacy programs, cancer programs, music programs and programs for the disabled youth and adults among others.

The residents of Community Board Six are direct recipients of our street fair driven donations. Over 90 percent of the licensed street vendors live in New York City. New York City residents directly benefit by being vendors and consumers at the fair.

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