Stuy Town author hoping to crowd-fund children’s book

Fran Alongi

By Sabina Mollot

While a trip to the chiropractor’s office might not be too many people’s idea of fun, one Stuyvesant Town resident recently found the experience worthy of writing a book.

Longtime resident Fran Alongi, who frequently sees a chiropractor for adjustments, said it was seeing how inviting the office has been for children and families, in no small part due to the presence of a mascot dog who humors young patients that want to chase him, that inspired her to write a story about it.

The book, her second, is called Max Gets Well-Adjusted and it’s intended for children ages 2-5. Her first book was a novel with fantasy aspects called The Moons of Koda, that she self-published in 2016. This time around she’s also self-publishing, only in this case, she’s hoping to get the associated costs crowd-funded. She currently has a GoFundMe page that’s seeking $3,000 for printing, illustration, advertising and other costs.

According to Alongi, the motivation for the book was to make children who might be scared of going to a chiropractor for a back problem or other issues more confident about the experience. She said she’d noticed while waiting to see the doctor that children who were there alongside their parents never seemed to be uncomfortable. What she soon realized was that this was because their parents didn’t seem nervous, especially since they were often patients themselves. Meanwhile, the office pooch, Cooper, was almost like a therapy dog in his willingness to run and hide from children, then letting them almost catch him.

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ST author hopes book will help people mourning a loved one

Fran Alongi

Fran Alongi

By Sabina Mollot

It was nine years ago when Fran Alongi, a Stuyvesant Town resident, lost her mother to a massive stroke. Though it was hardly the first time someone close to her had died, the death, along with a months-long period in which she was ill, was one of the most painful experiences Alongi could recall going through.

Prior to her mother’s stroke, Alongi had been meaning to write a book about personal loss, but it was her death, she explained, that spurred her into actually doing it.

She’d worked on the story, the genre of which is contemporary fantasy, on weekends since then – up until recently she’d also always had a corporate day job — and finally finished it last fall.

Titled Moons of Koda, the story has since been released as an e-book, which Alongi self-published, and she’s hoping it will be as helpful for others in to read as it was for her to write.

“It’s about having hope and believing during the grieving process,” said Alongi. The death of her mother, she noted, has remained a challenge. “I still have urges to call her. It’s very hard.”

Initially, she’d intended her book to be a children’s book, but friends who’ve read it advised her that the content seemed equally — if not more — appropriate for adults. The story revolves around a mysterious, somehow unearthly character called Koda, who Alongi named after the Sioux Indian word for friend.

“She comes into the world in a dark way which makes the (other characters) think she is a threat, but she’s not,” said Alongi. “She’s essentially an angelic figure.”

Moons of Koda is set in the 1950s in a small town in Wyoming. It’s there where the title character encounters a family with three young children whose father has died. Since Koda needs a place to stay, the mother allows her to sleep in their shed.

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