Opinion: Request for study on SBJSA

The following is an open letter to Public Advocate Letitia James from Sung Soo Kim, founder of The Small Business Congress. The letter has been edited for length.   

Honorable Public Advocate James:

Recently, Councilman Ydanis Rodriquez as prime sponsor reintroduced the Small Business Jobs Survival Act. This bill has the same language, word for word, as the one you proudly sponsored and championed at times in 2009, 2010 and 2014 as Public Advocate. It’s the same bill that you touted over the year’s at citywide events as the best solution to stop the closing of our small businesses and end their crisis and address the “Malling of Main Street.”

The new speaker of the Council, Corey Johnson, has pledged a public hearing on the bill, as well as finding a real solution to end the crisis. While small business advocates applaud this commitment, we are cautiously guarded in hoping our city’s small businesses finally, after eight long years, receive evenhanded and just treatment at City Hall.

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SBJSA advocates fear Council will vote to weaken legislation

Mar8 Future Bank of America

Four storefronts on 23rd Street at the corner of Fifth Avenue will soon become a Bank of America. (Photo by Sabina Mollot)

By Sabina Mollot

The Small Business Congress, which has been pushing hard for the Small Business Jobs Survival Act, is on the offensive, preparing for possible mutations of the bill in the City Council that the SBC fears would render it useless.

Steve Barrison, an attorney and the executive vice president of the SBC, is saying despite new Council Speaker Corey Johnson’s assertions that he wants to see the long-blocked legislation get a hearing, the Devil will be in the details of what Barrison expects will become “a REBNY bill.”

In an email earlier this week, the Small Business Congress founder Sung Soo Kim stated that he is seeking exactly 26 volunteers to convince the Council members who do not support the bill to change their minds.

It may not be easy, though, since technically the SBJSA is dead, Barrison said. This is because the prime sponsor had been Annabel Palma of the Bronx who was term-limited on December 31, 2017.

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Opinion: SBJSA would hurt, not help small businesses

In January, Town & Village published an editorial in support of the Small Business Jobs Survival Act (SBJSA). This was a week after publishing an article reporting on the status of two pieces of pending legislation aimed at helping mom-and-pop shops remain in their spaces, one of which was the SBJSA. Later, this newspaper published an op-ed by Sung Soo Kim that also supported the SBJSA.

The following op-ed is in response to that point of view.

By James R. O’Neill

Town & Village published an op-ed on January 18 regarding the most recent version of “Small Business Jobs Survival Act” (‘Unconstitutional’ claims about SBJSA are real estate propaganda,” by Sung Soo Kim, president, Small Business Congress).

As a commercial real estate agent who lives in the neighborhood, it would be remiss of me not to offer my perspective on a bill that claims to save the mom-and-pop shops but would, in fact, ultimately harm the stores it is trying to protect.

New York City is a city defined by change. Its vitality and ability to thrive have always been a direct result of that change, and it is what will ensure that New York continues to stay ahead of the curve. The misleadingly titled “Small Business Jobs Survival Act” (SBJSA), introduced in June, 2014, would greatly hinder the evolution that has allowed our city to prosper while creating a series of issues for not just the landlords, but also new businesses.

There are several issues with this bill that jump out immediately – in addition to its questionable legality. Speaking very broadly, although this bill’s stated intent is to help small businesses, it seeks to accomplish this by employing methods that are unfair, financially unsound and wholly unnecessary.

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