Letters to the Editor, Mar. 23

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Stella rerouted birds into local parks

Most likely because of the snowstorm (in some areas blizzard), migrating American Woodcocks had to make forced landings. Many of them landed in the parks. Central Park had more than 50 or more counted. Many landed in backyards, odd places. I will look in Stuyvesant Town. We have seen them in the past year on migrations.Most likely because of the snowstorm (in some areas blizzard), migrating American Woodcocks had to make forced landings. Many of them landed in the parks. Central Park had more than 50 or more counted. Many landed in backyards, odd places. I will look in Stuyvesant Town. We have seen them in the past year on migrations.

Unfortunately, a number of them died, perhaps window collisions, starvation, hawk predation, exhaustion, etc. The Wild Bird Fund at 558 Columbus Ave received many American Woodcocks for rehabilitation. Some were deceased, and some did not survive.  Many have survived thus far, and they will be released in Long Island where there is less snow. American Woodcocks rely on camouflage to avoid predation. That strategy does not work when there is snow. I saw 10 American Woodcocks and one Wilson’s Snipe in Central Park yesterday.

How do you rescue a Woodcock? Carry a sturdy shopping bag. (A box is better, but not convenient.) Punch a few holes for air in the bag. Put a cloth for perching in the bag. If the bird revives (because it’s just stunned) and starts banging and moving, release away from windows if possible. If it is truly injured, bring it to the above address. Right now the males are migrating. The females will come later. The Central Park hawks were predating some of the American Woodcocks. Also, if the bird is waving its body that is a hunting method, not a sign of injury.

Thanks,

Anne Lazarus, ST

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When Stella came to Stuyvesant Town

A nor’easter that hit New York on Tuesday wasn’t as bad as initially predicted in terms of actual snowfall, but since the storm named Stella had already been declared a weather emergency, this meant no shortage of caution was taken. In Stuyvesant Town as in the rest of the city, the snow melting efforts began before the snow and hail actually began to fall, and shoveling soon after, though Stuy Town management sent out several emails warning black ice was still inevitable due to the below freezing temperature. In one email, management noted that over five inches of snow had come down on the Oval just by 10:20 a.m. on Tuesday. Meanwhile, residents made the best of the near-blizzard conditions and a day off from school and work, hauling out their sleds and snowman making skills.

Photos by Maya Rader

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