PCV porters catch cell phone ‘thief’

Peter Cooper Village

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

An attempt to steal a Peter Cooper Village resident’s cell phone on Wednesday evening was cut short thanks to the quick actions of two porters on the property who ran after the suspect and caught him. The man was then held for Stuyvesant Town’s Public Safety department and later the police.

According to the District Attorney’s office, 19-year-old Joseph Small approached the victim in front of 370 First Avenue around 5:30 p.m. and demanded her iPhone before grabbing it from her hands and running away.

Small was charged with grand larceny and theft and was arrested in front of 375 First Avenue around 6:21 p.m.

The porters who nabbed the suspect are Joel Quezada and Jose Paredes. The Public Safety officer who was also involved is Kerron Safe. The DA’s office said that Safe recovered the victim’s phone from Small’s pocket.

Two cars splashed with paint thinner or acid outside PCV

The corrosive substance peeled the paint down to the metal on Cailin Krogman’s car door. (Photo courtesy of Cailin Krogman)

The corrosive substance peeled the paint down to the metal on Cailin Krogman’s car door. (Photo courtesy of Cailin Krogman)

By Sabina Mollot

While most drivers have experienced the delight of walking outside to find that their car’s tires have been slashed or the doors keyed by a random jerk, two cars owned by residents of Peter Cooper were recently on the receiving end of a splash attack by either paint thinner or some kind of acid.

One of the car owners, Cailin Krogman, said other cars may have been damaged by the substance, too, which caused the paint to peel back down to the metal all along the passenger door.

The perp, she believes, must have done it last Saturday night at some point after she parked her car at 6:45 p.m. near a Peter Cooper Village entrance on East 20th Street. Krogman didn’t discover the damage herself until the following Monday morning when leaving for work, but said a neighbor who’d been out walking her dog on Sunday morning saw the cars damaged at that time. Because of this, Krogman doesn’t believe she was personally targeted by anyone.

Continue reading

Kid on bike hits woman on PCV path

By Sabina Mollot

While normally the sight of speeding bikes in Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper is blamed on deliverymen from nearby restaurants, recently it was an eight-year-old child whose speeding resulted in an accident that left one woman in a cast.

The woman, a resident of Stuyvesant Town, said it was on July 13 at around 6 p.m. when she was walking her dog along a path in Peter Cooper near 541 East 20th Street and was knocked down from behind when a child on a bike crashed directly into her. Instinctively, she put out her arms to protect her head and ended up landing on them, fracturing her left wrist. Then, adding insult to injury, she said, was that the boy’s father berated her for being there. The woman, who asked that her name not be published, added that soon after she was hit, Public Safety officers were at the scene and when she gave her name and address to them, the boy’s father, a resident of PCV, asked what she was doing there.

“He said, in front of me, ‘You don’t belong here; you live in Stuyvesant Town,’” she said. She added that he initially resisted giving his own information to the officer, but ultimately admitted that when the accident occurred he was distracted by something on his phone. Meanwhile, the boy, she noticed was frozen in shock.

Fortunately, another man who lives nearby and saw her was friendlier, helping her into a cab so she could get treatment at NYU Langone Medical Center.

The woman, a longtime resident, said she contacted T&V for a couple of reasons. First, she said, she wants parents to make sure their kids’ bikes have bells or horns, and she also wants to make sure parents whose kids are learning to ride bikes actually do supervise them.

“If I was an older person, or a more frail person, I could have died,” she said. “This is a busy community.”

Fire in PCV injures 5

A firefighter gets ready to enter a fourth floor apartment at 601 East 20th Street. Photo via FDNY)

A firefighter gets ready to enter a fourth floor apartment at 601 East 20th Street. (Photo via FDNY)

By Sabina Mollot

An older resident was taken to the hospital for smoke inhalation after a fire broke out in a Peter Cooper Village apartment on Friday. The blaze, which the Fire Department got the call about at 5:13 p.m. took 29 minutes to get under control, with 20 units and 78 firefighters at the scene.

The resident, James Masterson, has been treated and released and is now fine, according to a woman who works for the couple as a caretaker. She wasn’t working at the apartment that day but said Masterson and his wife Bernadette were both home at the time the fire broke out.

“He inhaled smoke, but he’s fine now; they’re both fine,” she said.

The address where the fire broke out was on the fourth floor at 601 East 20th Street, which is on Avenue C.

The FDNY said that after the fire, four firefighters were taken to different local hospitals with minor injuries and one civilian was also taken to a hospital in serious but stable condition. The FDNY said it couldn’t confirm that it was Masterson or even the age of the patient.

Continue reading

Man down on First Avenue and 16th Street

By Sabina Mollot

Two Town & Village readers alerted us this week that on Monday night, Stuyvesant Town residents who live on East 16th Street and First Avenue got a frightening sight when coming home.

One resident walking by said he saw a man lying on the ground, bleeding. The resident was told by other people at the scene that the man had fallen, but, he added, it seemed like a lot of blood for a fall. He added that an EMS team and cops came, gave him CPR for five minutes before putting him on a stretcher and continuing CPR while putting him in the ambulance.

Another resident said both police officers and Stuy Town’s Public Safety officers were present at the scene.

According to a spokesperson for the FDNY, the department had gotten a call at 5:40 p.m. about a man suffering from a cardiac arrest and respiratory arrest. The man, whose age and name the spokesperson said he didn’t know, was bleeding from the nose and mouth and was unconscious. He said there was no hospital transport on record.

The NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Public Information had no information on the incident, explaining that the DCPI doesn’t always get information on aided cases. A spokesperson for CWCapital declined to comment since it was a medical issue.

Letters to the Editor, Apr. 9

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Thanks, TA for speaking up for neighbors

Re: ST-PCV Tenants Association’s Al Doyle gives testimony at rent regulation extension signing,” T&V, Apr. 2

We are very fortunate to have such well-spoken leaders in our Tenants Association as Alvin Doyle and Susan Steinberg to voice our concerns to our representatives in the City Council and those in Albany.

Having had lived in Stuyvesant Town during my entire married life and now as a widow, I am grateful for the community spirit and have appreciated the warm neighborliness that PCVST has provided. It is all well and good to strive to provide for new affordable housing as this city was built by and maintained by a strong middle class. It would be tragic to lose PCVST, which has served this city so remarkably, while politicians are promising and possibly not delivering new affordable housing. A little common sense should prevail please!

And why should Albany, who takes so much from NYC, have anything to do with our homes! We should have home rule!

I once invited Bruno to tea…no, he did not come but I wanted to have a little sit-down with him! Look where he is now. Why is he not in jail? Why did he have anything to do with trying to get me out of my home? And I’m still here…

I am thankful to the leaders of our Tenants Association, Dan Garodnick, Mark Thompson, (State Senator) Brad Hoylman and his predecessor Tom Duane, (Assembly Member) Brian Kavanagh, District Leader Louise Dankberg and others who have fought for the rights of the middle class! I know I have left many out but you know who you are. All politics are local and we all need to continue to fight for what is right.

Finally I am grateful for Town & Village who has covered our community since day one and helps keep us all informed and provides a mouthpiece for our concerns.

Kay Vota, ST

Note: This letter was first published as a comment on the Town & Village Blog, town-village.com.

Continue reading

Letters to the editor, Mar. 19

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

This one’s a job for PCV/ST Public Safety

Re: “Feeling helpless over neighbor’s noise,” T&V letter, Feb. 26

Mr. Weiner writes, “I didn’t call up security because I heard from other people they don’t do much or were told not to.” Since he has lived here for over 20 years, he should have known to seek help from our wonderful Public Safety department. These hard-working men and women are doing their best to keep everyone happy, not an easy task. We should support them and respect their efforts by trusting that they will do everything that can to keep this place safe and peaceful. They are responsible for enforcing management’s rules for maintaining a high quality of life here in our community, including management’s noise policy.

If your neighbors are not as considerate as they should be, don’t hesitate to call upon Public Safety to come to the rescue. They are here to protect us, not only from thieves, muggers and thugs, but also from each other. They have and they will. Call them.

John Cappelletti, ST

Continue reading

Letters to the Editor, Mar. 12

Upstairs neighbors making my life hell

Re: Recent letters on noise from neighboring apartments due to a lack of carpeting

Dear Editor,

No carpet = hell, pure hell!

To annoy, torture, harass and bully me, my upstairs neighbors have been:

Slamming/throwing heavy furniture against the floors during their wild parties around 1 a.m. or 3 a.m.

Dragging/moving furniture against wooden floors day and night constantly.

Making loud footsteps with shoes with high heels day and night and doing it deliberately and enjoying it, every step.

Dropping, striking, rolling metals and heavy objects against wooden floors constantly.

Tap dancing against the wooden floors early in days and late nights.

Jogging back and forth inside the apartment regardless of the time of the day and night.

Every day after work, I must spend countless hours staying in McDonald’s, Dunkin Donuts or in my church praying and staying in my friends’ houses — just to avoid hearing those unbearable nuisances from my upstairs neighbors.

My doctor had to increase the dosage of my high blood pressure pill. I had to seek professional help/counseling to deal with my anger management because my landlord, security, my local politicians and my neighbors cannot help me and I feel I am about to snap.

I can hardly afford to pay my rent but now I have to pay legal fees to my lawyer to help me.

Whatever happened to the golden rule: “Do not do unto others what you do not want others to do unto you” and the Christian rule, “Love thy neighbors as you love yourself”? It is hard for me to believe — being a tenant in Stuyvesant Town — I am having nightmares and I have to fight for myself to have a decent, good quality of life.

Sincerely,

Jovenal Arboleda, ST

Continue reading

Letters to the Editor, Jan. 8

Jan8 Toon Panda

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Mayor ‘focused’ on affordability how?

Re: “TA not scared off by $4.7B debt figure,” T&V, Jan. 8

To the Editor:

Here we go again! T&V states, “The mayor has so far not taken a position on the TA’s goal of a non-eviction condo conversion, though he’s focused on preserving affordability at the approximately 6,000 apartments in ST/PCV that are still in fact affordable.”

How can Town & Village or any other newspaper or media state this as fact when the evidence is to the contrary? What proof is T&V using to make this statement? Using basic 1+1=2 math any child should be able to understand that raising the rent every year is going to make once-affordable apartments UNaffordable. And this, unfortunately, is the truth. Like his Republican predecessors, our mayor has appointed all nine members of the current landlord-friendly Rent Guidelines Board which has just given tenants another annual rent increase by a vote of 5-4. And unless the mayor changes the composition of his personally-selected Rent Guidelines Board to one  favoring tenants instead of landlords, as it has for the past 24 years, we can look forward to more and more rent increases for as long as de Blasio is in office.

When I moved to Stuy Town I was using 20 percent of my salary to pay rent. Now, as a result of yearly rent increases, I’m paying 50 percent. So would someone explain to me how this supports the statement that the mayor is “focused on preserving affordability at the approximately 6,000 apartments in ST/PCV”?  I will not believe that de Blasio cares one bit about affordable housing in Stuy Town until he appoints five members to his board that will vote in favor of tenants. Anything less is just more political malarkey and newspapers should not assist in its dissemination.

John Cappelletti, ST

Editor’s note: John Cappelletti makes a fair point. The mayor’s talk about preserving affordability in Stuy Town is encouraging, but some action would be nice, too.

Continue reading

Local resident cries foul as tree is axed on East 20th street

A tree near 440 East 20th Street was cut down.

A tree near 440 East 20th Street was cut down.

By Sabina Mollot
Last Tuesday afternoon, a Stuyvesant Town resident walking past 440 and 430 East 20th Street said she noticed that a very tall, mature tree was in the midst of being cut down.
The resident, who asked that her name not be published, told Town & Village she’d asked a nearby Public Safety officer what was going on and was initially told that the tree was just being trimmed for safety reasons.
She was also told it had to do with the tree being in the way of a ramp for disabled residents that was going to
be built alongside the building.
The building already has a ramp but according to the officer, that one wasn’t up to code.

The stump of the tree was later removed as well.

The stump of the tree was later removed as well.

The resident added that after she stuck around a while, it became clear that the tree was actually being cut down, so she headed over to the new management office to make a complaint about what seemed like unnecessary arborcide as well as the lack of notice that a tree would be coming down.
That’s when she said she was told by a property manager that the tree was actually diseased.
She didn’t get a response as to the lack of notice though other than management tends to get overwhelmed due to all the work going on at the property at any given time.
After returning later in the day to the spot where the tree had been, the stump that had been there briefly after it was chopped was also gone.
A spokesperson for CWCapital did not respond to a request for comment on the tree.

Letters to the Editor, Nov. 13

Ice rink is still noisy

What chemicals are in the blue barrels stored in the ice skating rink? Are they hazardous? Fire engines responded to a call at 19 Stuyvesant Oval on Friday evening, October 24 around 8 p.m. (if not then Saturday evening). They were doing a sweep from the top floor on down. Response was perhaps to an odor of gas (not clear on the details of why they came, but I did overhear someone say it was due to the skating rink).

Follow up to the new tented recreational area on a playground that has been a basketball and volley ball court:

Welcome to my world! Those residents who are concerned about the noise level surrounding the new tented recreational area on playground, come to my apartment adjacent to the ice skating rink and you will find out what kind of noise levels that are in store for you! Every afternoon and mornings as well on weekends or holidays you can hear the screams and shouts of unsupervised children as they skate and slam into the boards for hours on end.

Where have you been, Tenants Association and our fave councilman Dan Garodnick regarding the constant disturbing noise level due to construction and deconstruction of the rink each year for months at a time and the daily noise level of the Zamboni cleaning the ice surface? There should be staff members on the ice at all times providing supervision and monitoring the children’s activities and keeping down the noise level. And please don’t scream out “Off the ice!” when a session is completed.

Why don’t they make a bubble or tent over the rink and keep the sound level enclosed as they are now providing at the tented recreational playground? Are we any less worthy of consideration in our neck of the woods?

And how about instead of being charged ridiculous MCIs in perpetuity, how about a rent reduction for the decreased quality of living due to the greed of making money on previously free playground space? Thanks for your consideration.

Richard Axel, ST

Continue reading

Letters to the Editor, Nov. 6

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Common sense lost during Sandy?

To the editor:

As a resident of Peter Cooper Village for more than 20 years, I have frequently driven onto Peter Cooper Road to drop off packages or pick up passengers. Until recently, the guard at the gatehouse copied the four digits from the resident sticker on my windshield and waved me in.

That began to change about three months ago, when one guard asked me where I was going. I pointed to the sticker and said that was all he needed.
“We don’t use them anymore,” said my interrogator, standing just across from the sign that says “Admittance by sticker only.” He went on to explain that the “book” containing the resident information linked to the stickers was “lost in Hurricane Sandy.”

Really? And it only took our Public Safety department two years to have discovered this. That really inspires confidence.

If the “book” were destroyed, it could be replaced. (Hint to Public Safety: This is the 21st century. You can store information electronically.) PCV residents who own cars can be asked to reapply for stickers. Or PCV could go really high tech and adopt the barcode readers that are already used in the complex’s garages to record exactly when cars enter and exit.

I have since been told by Public Safety guards that asking me where I’m going is for my own protection. If I overstay my allotted time on Peter Cooper Road, they will have my address and apartment number so that they can warn me before I get towed.

Am I to understand that Public Safety assumes that everyone is always honest? Why else would they prefer taking a driver’s word to actually knowing the name, address, apartment number, phone number and vehicle identification information of residents entering the complex by car? You see, all that information is linked to the four-digit number on my windshield sticker.

The reasons given for the new policy are absurd. I can only conclude that this is yet another way for management to harass long-time residents. They must believe that if they impose enough meaningless rules, we’ll all move out and PCV/ST will be completely market rate.

Joe Lisanti, PCV

Continue reading

Editorial: A little information goes a long way, Say yes to debating, not mud-slinging

A little information goes a long way

Last week, an attempted rape of a woman in a Stuyvesant Town elevator sent shockwaves through the community, which despite the occasional assault or robbery, has a reputation for being safer than most neighborhoods.

Far less shocking, but still disturbing was the fact that there was no attempt by the owner of the complex to reach out to residents. Town & Village reported on the crime on our blog shortly after the police released information about the attack, as did other local news outlets, and the Tenants Association sent out an e-mail blast to warn neighbors.

There was a time when, if there was a crime in the community, fliers would be posted in prominent spaces in lobbies, but sadly that hasn’t been the case in years.

In a recent high profile sex crime incident, in which, the “Stuy Town groper” victimized two women in the complex, fliers were distributed, but they came from local State Senator Brad Hoylman and his aides, not property management.

CWCapital didn’t respond to a request from this newspaper on Friday to speak with the chief of Public Safety or anyone else who could provide more details about the attack, other than to say (on Monday after the arrest) that security had been beefed up over the weekend and that a comment would be forthcoming. We’re still waiting.

The point here as long as management prefers to let tenants hear about crime in their apartment complex from the media and the TA, it’s going to appear that they care more about not scaring away potential renters than protecting those who’ve already signed on the dotted line.

CW already knows how to communicate with tenants when management wants to, sending emailed newsletters and Facebook posts to promote events and the soon to open ice rink. It would take no more effort to keep tenants in the loop about criminal activity.

Say yes to debating, not mud-slinging

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, who’s held her position in Washington for 22 years, is currently running against Nicholas Di iorio, a former seminary student and former Pfizer employee whose party (Republican) automatically makes him a longshot. Di iorio has spent the past several weeks calling Maloney out for not accepting invitations to publicly debate him.

When asked why she wasn’t debating him, a rep for Maloney said she has agreed to a debate (scheduled for October 28 in an event held by the 17th Precinct Community Council).

Still, Di iorio this week issued press releases accusing Maloney of not debating him, but rather only agreeing to “show up” at the event, a candidates forum, then “speak for 20 minutes and take questions from the audience for 10 minutes.”

Maloney spokesperson Kathy Lynn responded to say the event, which she described as a debate, would have the format of candidates each getting a five-minute opening statement, followed by each candidate getting a short rebuttal.

Following that, the audience asks questions that are facilitated by a moderator,” Lynn said. “This is the format proposed by the 17th Precinct and both campaigns agreed to this when they accepted the invitation to participate.”

When asked for clarification on what the event was, an officer at the 17th Precinct told a T&V reporter it’s “not really a debate,” because there would be no formatted questions, but candidates from local races would have the opportunity to speak and take some questions.

So okay, it’s not technically a debate, but she’s also not shying away from questions.

Now this event aside, as to whether or not we think Maloney (or any candidate) should agree to participate in a debate event if invited and if their schedule permits, the answer is of course.

In Maloney’s case, the fact there hasn’t been a Republican elected in Manhattan since Roy Goodman left the State Senate may make expending the energy on a debate seem like a waste. Maybe, for her, it is.

Still, we think it’s still important for longtime candidates to continue to prove themselves to voters and also to show that they have nothing to hide.

That said, we also think Di iorio might have a better shot at being taken seriously if he’d tone down the near weekly ripping of Maloney via press releases.

As the election looms closer, the candidate has begun sending out statements bashing Maloney on everything from her trip to China to get a panda for New York (while Di iorio went to Israel) to authoring lots of bills that haven’t passed the house to not doing enough about Ebola.

These are fair game topics, but after a while, constant mud-slinging can begin to look like a too-desperate attempt to get attention and voters tune it out.

It’s also worth noting that the past two elections Maloney has run in, most recently with Republican Chris Wight and prior to that with Democrat Reshma Saujani during the primary, were pretty contentious. The attacks on Maloney in both races were nonstop and still Saujani and Wight were easily clobbered by Maloney.

It’s hard to say whether or not the negative campaigning had anything to do with it, since a well-known incumbent is always going to have an extreme advantage over a political newcomer. But it obviously didn’t help.

ID theft is common type of larceny in 13th Precinct

Deputy Inspector David Ehrenberg gives the latest local crime stats at Tuesday’s 13th Precinct Community Council meeting. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

Deputy Inspector David Ehrenberg gives the latest local crime stats at Tuesday’s 13th Precinct Community Council meeting. (Photo by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

In the first 13th precinct community council meeting after the summer break, the precinct’s commanding officer, Deputy Inspector David Ehrenberg reported that after a mostly uneventful season, crime is up 5.2 percent this month. However, he added that crime is down for the year overall.

Grand larcenies, traditionally a problem for this area, were up this month but are also down 7 percent for the year and decreased during the summer, Ehrenberg said.

Identity theft is the most common type of grand larceny and the deputy inspector noted that the precinct is still having problems with thieves stealing debit card information with card scanners taped over ATMs.

When a resident at the meeting inquired about the bank’s awareness of the problem in their own ATMs, Ehrenberg added that they weren’t necessarily at fault for missing it.

“The skimmers are only on the ATM for a very short period of time, for about an hour,” he said. “They’re usually put on later in the evening after the bank was closed already so they wouldn’t always notice.”

Ehrenberg emphasized that residents should call 911 when they encounter one of these skimmers, which are easily recognizable because they are flimsy and attached with double-sided tape.

Felony assaults have also been a problem this summer but Ehrenberg noted that in most cases, the fights involved people that knew each other. The increases are also due to assaults of EMTs at Bellevue and the shelters in the area. Grand larceny auto is also up, with nine cars being stolen within the precinct this month, compared to six that had been stolen by the same point last year. Ehrenberg noted that there seems to be a trend there and that it’s mostly rental cars that are getting swiped.

“There’s a way they can overcome the security system that Zipcar uses,” he said. “There’s another way they can use the device to get in and steal the cars. It’s a popular system and it’s going to take them a while to change it, so we’re seeing an increase in that in the command.”

He added that residents don’t have to worry so much about a car they have rented being stolen because most of these incidents have occurred in the locations where the cars are picked up.

As in the past, grand larceny of unattended property continues to be a problem for the precinct.

“There are still a lot of laptops being left in restaurants and coffee shops. You’re not going to leave $2,000 in cash just sitting there, so don’t leave your laptop,” Ehrenberg warned.

Residents at the meeting were curious about the impact of the mayor’s Vision Zero plan, which was introduced over the summer. Captain Steven Hellman noted that since Mayor de Blasio has been in office, the precinct has seen decreases in collisions this summer. There is currently an arterial slow zone on Seventh Avenue and Sixth Avenue will be a slow zone this December.

As in most community council meetings in the past, residents also expressed their frustrations about cyclists who don’t follow the rules of the road, often riding on sidewalks and without lights at night.

One Stuyvesant Town resident said that he’s been seeing delivery people riding their bikes recklessly near his building at 21 Stuyvesant Oval.

“You’re going to find a body in 20 different pieces due to these bicyclists,” the resident said. “They’re like kamikazes coming around the curve behind 21 Oval. Someone is going to get killed on the bottom of the hill. Pedestrians are getting less safe.“

Police Officer John Sedita said that the NYPD has a good relationship with Stuyvesant Town’s Public Safety officers and would talk to them about the issue. Another resident, though, had a suggestion for those two-wheeled officers as well.

“Remind Stuy Town security that they need lights on their bikes, too,” the resident, who didn’t want to be identified, said at the meeting.

Letters to the editor, Sept. 18

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

Does noisy work have to be done at 7 a.m.?

To the Editor:

The other day around 9:30 a.m. I passed a group of PCV/ST workers sitting on a bench taking a coffee break. Their leaf blowers were resting quietly on the ground along with a large pile of leaves. It was quiet, but it was very noisy earlier when these leaf blowers were operating their loud machines, probably around 7 a.m.

I say 7 because on another occasion at 7, I called Public Safety to complain about these early morning noises which make it impossible for many residents like me to get adequate sleep. Public Safety identified that morning’s noise as a street sweeper and referred me to Resident Services. The woman at Resident Services told me that this noise was necessary because management “has to maintain the property.”

When I informed her of NYC’s law prohibiting loud machine noises before 8 a.m., she referred me to the property manager. But when I called the property manager, she wasn’t answering her phone so I left a message to call me back regarding the noisy machines. She still hasn’t returned my call and I’m betting she never will. After all, what could she say?

On pcvstliving.com, management states, “We are dedicated to providing the most comfortable and convenient experience for our residents.” Also, management’s “noise policy” urges residents to “Be mindful and considerate of neighbors during traditionally quiet hours (late night and early morning).”

Furthermore, “it is expected that you will do everything possible to diminish the transmission of sound and noise.”

Huh? Is this the same management that doesn’t return residents’ calls about excessive noise? The same management that has street sweepers, lawn mowers, leaf blowers and other loud machines destroying the peace and quiet of those “traditionally quiet hours (late night and early morning)?” The same management that expects residents to “do everything possible to diminish the transmission of sound and noise”?

Noise is definitely a quality of life issue and both management and residents should be expected “to do everything possible” to maintain at least a reasonable, if not high, quality of life for humans on the property, not just the physical property itself.

After all, what’s more important, humans or property maintenance? So would it be possible for our dedicated, mindful and considerate management to schedule the operation of all those loud noisy machines at the same time when the PCVST workers were having their coffee break at 9:30 a.m.? It’s very simple really. All the quiet work and coffee breaks could be scheduled in the early morning while the loud and noisy work would be performed after 9:30.

It would be nice to be awakened in “those traditionally quiet hours” of early morning with the comfortable experience of bird song instead of Armageddon.

John Cappelletti, ST

Continue reading