Police Watch: Man choked woman on bus, Teen busted for stolen credit cards

MAN CHOKED WOMAN ON BUS, SPIT ON COPS
Police arrested a 30-year-old John Doe for alleged obstruction of breath in front of 489 Second Avenue on Saturday, December 1 at 1:19 p.m. The victim told police that the man approached her while she was on a bus and took his thumbs, pressing them to her neck while pressing her face against the window. The man was also charged with harassment. The man was also charged with resisting arrest and harassment for allegedly spitting on two officers who were attempting to arrest him.

ACS TEEN BUSTED FOR STOLEN CREDIT CARDS
Police arrested a teenager for possession of stolen property inside the ACS facility at 492 First Avenue on Saturday, December 1 at 1:37 p.m. Police said that the teen was in possession of six credit cards that didn’t belong to him.

MAN ARRESTED IN UNION SQUARE FOR ALLEGED MIDTOWN ROBBERY
Police arrested 30-year-old Dejuan Gore at the corner of Union Square East and East 14th on Monday, November 26 for an alleged robbery that took place in Midtown in October. Police said that Gore and another person allegedly robbed the victim inside the subway station at 59th Street and Lexington Avenue on October 17 at 8:45 a.m. The other suspect allegedly punched the victim in the face, causing pain and swelling, while Gore reportedly took cell phones from the victim.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Seniors warned: Don’t ignore summonses

Fidel Del Valle, commissioner of the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, speaks at the event held at the Sirovich Center, pictured with Council Member Carlina Rivera (Photos by Maria Rocha-Buschel)

By Maria Rocha-Buschel

Ignoring that $100 ticket could end up costing more than $12,000.

The high price tag of ignoring a summons was a major impetus for the workshop held by Councilmember Carlina Rivera at the Sirovich Senior Center on East 12th Street last Friday.

Representatives from the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, which handles most of the summonses issued in the city, wanted to educate seniors on the new ways in which the city is helping residents deal with summonses without even leaving their homes, which can be especially useful for seniors who have mobility challenges.

Assistant Commissioner Marisa Senigo said that there isn’t specific data about how many summonses seniors as a group receive because the agency doesn’t record demographic information, but summonses issued to seniors would often fall under the “personal behavior” category, such as public consumption of alcohol, public urination or being in a park after dark.

Continue reading