Letters to the Editor, Apr. 20

Cartoon by Jim Meadows

It’s only another local business

After 40 years serving high-quality food at reasonable prices, our neighborhood vegetarian restaurant, Angelica’s, is closing its doors.

Reportedly, the main reason for this sad event is the increase in rent to $26,000 a month. In order to meet this landlord-imposed hefty price tag, symbolic of the Trump Administration’s values or lack thereof, the owner, Leslie McEachern, would have to pay her employees the equivalent of the Chinese child-worker rate, probably a bowl of rice.

In addition, in lieu of serving fresh organic produce and helping local farmers support their families, Leslie would have to serve to her patrons the cheapest food available, food no doubt lacking in the nutritional value of organics. Although many business men are guided by the principles encapsulated by the phrase “It’s only business,” Leslie would never serve meals under these conditions.

Following in the bootsteps of the Trump administration, which intends to throw such humanitarian programs as Meals on Wheels under the bus, Angelica’s landlord has returned our earth Angel-ica to heaven much sooner than her patrons would like and if this landlord were asked, “Where is Angelica’s?” he’d no doubt reply, “She sleeps with the fishes.” I guess we are in the tyrannical age of “It’s only business.”

John Cappelletti, ST

Continue reading

How volunteers are helping New Yorkers manage their debt

A volunteer helps a client at an FCC center.

A volunteer helps a client at an FCC center.

By Sabina Mollot

In 2007, when low-income New Yorkers began turning to sub-prime lenders and check-cashing services as well as other high-risk practices due to a lack of traditional available bank services, a local nonprofit organization responded by launching a program aimed at getting those people out of the financial holes they inevitably ended up in.

The program, called Financial Coaching Corps (FCC), was launched by Community Service Society of New York, an organization that’s headquartered at 105 East 22nd Street near Park Avenue South. Community Service Society (CSS), for its endeavors aimed at fighting poverty, uses a team of volunteers who are 55 years old or older.

Its volunteer recruitment program is called RSVP (Retired and Senior Volunteer Program) and those volunteers, following a rigorous training program, become financial coaches who then offer free assistance to clients who have credit or debt issues.

Reyes Irizarry, project director of Financial Coaching Corps of Community Service Society of New York, recently spoke with Town & Village about the program and how it helps New Yorkers in financial crisis situations.

Continue reading